Louisville Rotary Meetings 2018     
1st Quarter
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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 3, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 3. first-of-the-month business meeting held in the Fellowship Hall at Paradise United Church of Christ. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance then the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Fifteen members attended the meeting.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood asked for a home for exchange student Marco. It is critical. A home without               children would be fine. A home for just a month would be a help.

* Jim Edwards pitched in a dollar to tell us about Isaish Thomas’ first game as a    Cleveland Cavalier.

*  Eva thanked the new group of cooks for our meals.

* Al Gress discussed the programming for the next three months.

Business

Ø  A list of candidates for next year is in progress. A candidate for President-Elect is needed.

Ø  Rotary District 6650 distributed nearly $50,000 to local clubs for community projects. A few of the projects included: a skate park, doctor visits for homeless veterans, holiday food baskets, community welcome signs, warm coats for students, scholarships, handicap ramp, free little library and a courthouse square fountain. The Louisville Club used their $350 grant for sponsoring a RYLA student. Last year, the club sponsored four high school juniors for the weekend seminar. We have budgeted for four more this year.

Ø  The Taste of Louisville project was briefly discussed with Eva Roshong taking charge again. The first challenge is obtaining a location. Jen Anderson will discuss a location with the Chamber of Commerce.

Ø  Al Gress discussed the work session for Houston, TX. set for April 22-28 sponsored by Paradise Church. Pastor David Anderson will speak about the trip next meeting. Mark Sigler has already planned to participate.

Ø  Jim Edwards gave a flag report. He announced that Glenn Heiller would be constructing a listing of the dates for flag posting and retrieval for all the volunteers.

      >   We received $1,394 for the Pancake Breakfast on the day of the event and have     spent $469.60 for a net of $924.40.  Funds we anticipate receiving from Biery               Cheese have not received.

                                                                  Coming events

Jan. — 10 Jeff Mann, a Red Cross worker who worked the fire lines during the recent                                California fires.

Jan. — 17 A Vietnam War vet will speak of his experiences. He went, he fought, he                                               survived.

Jan. 24 — Fire Chief Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Department.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 10, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 10 meeting held in the Fellowship Hall at Paradise United Church of Christ. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance then the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Like an ancient phoenix, Mark Sigler rose from his seat and led the Rotarians in a rousing rendition of God Bless America. Seventeen members attended the meeting; there were four guests.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood announced that he found a home for exchange student Marco, but a home               without cats is needed for Ermma, one of our female exchange students.

 

Business

Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson discussed a planned mission trip to Upper Galveston, Texas set for April 21-28. The plan is to work in conjunction with The Fuller Center of Housing who is one of the coordinators for rebuilding homes from the damage of Hurricane Harvey. Most of the houses have already been gutted, according to Anderson. Now the work will involve dry walling, painting, electrical and finish. Volunteers will take two days to travel there and two days back. There are four churches in the Houston Area that will provide housing. Local volunteers will prepare the evening meals except for Wednesday when volunteers may go out into the community to experience local cuisine. Volunteers are expected to support the volunteer cooks. There will be two large dorms, one for males and one for females. Volunteers will sleep on cots, so volunteers should bring sleeping bags or linens. Pillows will be provided, but bring your own towels. Showers and bathrooms are nearby. There are hotels nearby if you’re more comfortable with that. Volunteers are to arrive on Sunday, and the afternoon will be devoted to an orientation. They will leave the following Saturday. There will be evening ecumenical devotions at three of the local churches. Most of the worksites are within 10 miles of the churches. There is a $100 fee to cover expenses. Volunteers must provide their own transportation. Bring what tools you can.

This is a non-denominational mission and all persons are welcome to participate, but the group is limited to forty participants. For questions and registration, call the church at 330-875-2677.

The Program

            Local resident Jeff Mann shared with the Rotarians his experiences as a Red Cross volunteer working the California wild fires several weeks ago. Jeff used a narrated 7-minute film to give watches an eye witness account of the devastation. Jeff, a retired YMCA executive, was flown to Sacramento for a 14-day tour of duty providing basic Red Cross services. Upon arriving, he said he hit the Red Cross trifecta — “new friends, volunteering and helping people in need.” His unit of about 100 persons was bunked at the CalX racetrack where they slept on cots. Later, they slept in the gymnasium of Dominican University in San Rafael, north of San Francisco, with 175 other volunteers. “I was always amazed at the number of people who thanked us for helping,” he said. “That was truly humbling.” The first day out his unit was stopped due to a large hillside fire, which turned them back. They arrived in Sonoma to give out food kits, shovels and more. The next day they were headed into the St. Helena mountain area where there were 128 fire crews working. The photos of smoking foundations were scary. One day they hiked up to Montcama Road and in less than 45 minutes they helped 15 families with fire kits that included shovels, rakes, gloves, plastic tarps & bags, cleaning supplies and lots of water and Gatorade. The next day they worked at the Hanna Boys Center, a FEMA center that was set up as a one-stop disaster stop — all state and local support agencies were set up to help the residents.

“Their stories were heart rendering,” he said. “People wander around who had lost everything. There was a young mom with two small children poking among the burned rubble looking for their lost cat.” Jeff explained. “In some places the fire was so hot it melted automobiles. We got a chance to talk to the local people and I must admit I got caught up in what’s going on. I couldn’t believe that I had now gone 12 days without watching TV or reading a newspaper.”

“I would do it again,” he reiterated. “Yes, I definitely would go again.”

Coming events

Jan. — 17 A Vietnam War vet will speak of his experiences. He went, he fought, he                                               survived.

Jan. 24 — Fire Chief Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Department.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary



Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 17, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 17 meeting held in the Fellowship Hall at Paradise United Church of Christ. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance then the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Mark Sigler led the Rotarians in a singing of It’s a Grand Old Flag. That song was chosen because of the service veterans present for today’s program. Eighteen members attended the meeting along with were three guests. The guests included Jack Pollan from the Malvern Rotary Club, and Mr. and Mrs. Gary Carper, guests of Bill Wood. Gary is an Army veteran who fought in Vietnam.

Happy Dollars

·         Betty Derry gave an update of the renovation progress in the downtown building now owned by the Historical Society. Progress is slow, but sure.

·         Glenn Heiller is happy because Ken Smith is present and is making progress in his recovery.

·         Bob Hallier gave the report that he now has his Christmas gift — an Echo — up and working. (I’m assuming everyone knows what an Echo is).

The Program

Jim Edwards introduced the speaker, Charles Lee Gross, and told about his book titled Superstes Gradus that Jim has read. Jim, an Air Force veteran, was impressed with his story and invited him to present his message for a Rotary program.

The book’s title, Superstes Gratus, means grateful survivor, and is a compilation of nearly 30 years of memories of an important time in Gross’s life. The message of the story is the one year, nine months, sixteen days and 12 hours, or so, of his tour as an Army soldier in Vietnam. The WHY he wrote the book is summed up in his words on page 3 . . . “Unless you have been there . . . unless you have actually felt the sting of combat . . . experienced the fear and terror . . . it is impossible to imagine what it is like or to describe it accurately.” He writes that the purpose for writing his book and telling his story is twofold; first, to enlighten the people what was like to change an ordinary American youth into a combat soldier fighting for his country half way around the world. His second purpose is to give credit and honor the brave soldiers, buddies of his, who did not make it home. The book is filled with pictures, maps plus official and personal letters. Some of the information in this report is taken from Charles’s message to the Rotarians, and some from his book.

Charles graduated from Alliance High School, Class of 1963. He bounced around attending college at Malone and later the Canton Business College from which he received a degree in June of 1968. The draft letter came before he could return to Malone. He was ordered to report for induction on June 26, 1969.

His Rotary presentation was enhanced with 163 color slides that began with his basic training at Ft. Campbell Kentucky. The Army decided that he would make a good tank driver, and so it was. In Nam, he was assigned to the 11th Armored Calvary Regiment, also known as the Blackhorse Regiment. The unit’s battle motto was “Find the bastards then pile on.” His unit was moved to the front lines of the war.

The story, told in a chronological order, begins with Charles’s early life, his family, and the day he was drafted. Then we move to Fort Campbell, on to Ft. Knox for advanced training, and 24-hour flight to Vietnam. The story concludes with his return home and moving back into society. Just a few of the poignant stories in the book include:

* The importance of getting mail and chocolate-chip cookies from his girlfriend, Catherine Ann Holland. (He married her and they are still together after 46 years).

* He still remembers vividly the first casualty of his unit. That death was his unit’s sergeant while they were on patrol getting ready to cross a creek. There were nine fatalities in unit while he was in Nam.

* He tells of the first time he was shot at. “The bullets sounded like bees as they passed close by his head,” he said.

* His first tank was named Easy Rider, after the movie of that time.

* His favorite weapon was the 50-caliber machine gun.

* When he went to Nam his weight was 196; when he came home his weight was 156.

* His first impression of Vietnam was that it was hot and it smelled.

* He met George Patton III, the outgoing Regimental Commander.

* The last three months of his tour he drove the commander’s Jeep.

The book concludes with a section about visiting the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial in Washington. “Vets just call it The Wall,” he wrote. The following is a Biblical passage that Charles found dear. It is printed near the last page of the book.

Thru many dangers, toils, and snares

I have already come:

Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,

And grace will lead me home.

                                    John 9:25

Coming events

Jan. 24 — Fire Chief Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Department.

Jan. 31 — Assistant Superintendent of the Louisville Schools Ann Minor

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 24, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson was absent for the Jan. 17 meeting so President-Elect Wendy Harlen stepped in. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Thirteen members attended the meeting.  

Happy Dollars

·         Betty Derry gave a pitch for the Historical Society’s annual banquet mentioning that tickets were printed and now available. She also thanked the library for the use of the Old Post Office Building for the past five years.

·         Denny Valentine reported that the brochure was still in the working stages.

·         Bob Hallier reported what the library is planning now that the levy was defeated. The question is How can we best handle library services? He said the report should be ready for the community in two to three months.

·         Bill Wood said there was still a need for a home for Emma.

The Program

Allen Gress introduced the program speaker, Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Chief who recently returned from the Texas Gulf Coast. Chief Peterson is also an adjunct professor of Fire Science at Stark State College.

“Training first responders has been a marathon this year,” he began. “This year we have had mega snow storms, hurricanes, floods, shootings and mud slides.” Chief wanted the group to suppose what the amount of resources were needed this past year? “But what does that have to do with Louisville, Ohio?” he asked. “Well, we have to be prepared for any disaster . . . who would have thought that we’d have a structure collapse in downtown Louisville? Would the Las Vegas emergency forces think there would be one of the worst mass shootings ever in their jurisdiction?”

The truth is — we have to have a plan, he stressed. That is one of the reasons the NTFD has a swift water rescue team that gets called several times a year.“ In 1993-94, we had our first 100-year flood,” he continued. “Now we’ve accepted that floods are a fact of life in our area; we weren’t prepared then. We have to get in the game or get out of it.”

Peterson said his department now has a trench rescue team that trains with units from Canton City and Plain Township departments. “And we’re all facing the drug OD crisis.” NTFD has on average three OD calls a week. “Our resources are being tapped.” One of the problems with the drug calls is how to protect the EMS guys from accidental contact with the drug. “We keep five doses of Narcan on each vehicle, two for the victim and three for the responders.”

Peterson said he is working with Louisville Police Chief Andy Turowski and Stark County Sheriff George Maier to with state legislatures for a better defined Active Shooter policy. “We’re trying to develop a curriculum for these incidents.”

Professor Peterson said there are fewer persons studying fire science than in the past. “We used to have full classes at Stark State,” he said. “Now we have 10 or 12 in a class. Plain Township Fire used to have a long list of applicants; now they are down to 10. There’s now a shortage of trained personnel.

“The generation coming into the fire fighting business want time off, paid vacations, health care insurance — nobody wants to volunteer,” he lamented.

Cencom, Nimishillen Fire’s dispatch center, is dispatching for 25 agencies. “We started years ago with 11.” Peterson said they are getting ready to upgrade all their equipment. In answer to the question, Peterson said he advertises job openings by using social media. “There’s a lot of word of mouth, too,” he said. “The teaching young fire fighters social skills are important.”

Will there ever be consolidation? he was asked. “Sooner or later it’s coming,” he responded. “Regionalization.”

 

Coming events

Jan. 31 — Assistant Superintendent of the Louisville Schools Ann Minor

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary