Louisville Rotary Meetings 2018     
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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 3, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 3. first-of-the-month business meeting held in the Fellowship Hall at Paradise United Church of Christ. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance then the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Fifteen members attended the meeting.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood asked for a home for exchange student Marco. It is critical. A home without               children would be fine. A home for just a month would be a help.

* Jim Edwards pitched in a dollar to tell us about Isaish Thomas’ first game as a    Cleveland Cavalier.

*  Eva thanked the new group of cooks for our meals.

* Al Gress discussed the programming for the next three months.

Business

Ø  A list of candidates for next year is in progress. A candidate for President-Elect is needed.

Ø  Rotary District 6650 distributed nearly $50,000 to local clubs for community projects. A few of the projects included: a skate park, doctor visits for homeless veterans, holiday food baskets, community welcome signs, warm coats for students, scholarships, handicap ramp, free little library and a courthouse square fountain. The Louisville Club used their $350 grant for sponsoring a RYLA student. Last year, the club sponsored four high school juniors for the weekend seminar. We have budgeted for four more this year.

Ø  The Taste of Louisville project was briefly discussed with Eva Roshong taking charge again. The first challenge is obtaining a location. Jen Anderson will discuss a location with the Chamber of Commerce.

Ø  Al Gress discussed the work session for Houston, TX. set for April 22-28 sponsored by Paradise Church. Pastor David Anderson will speak about the trip next meeting. Mark Sigler has already planned to participate.

Ø  Jim Edwards gave a flag report. He announced that Glenn Heiller would be constructing a listing of the dates for flag posting and retrieval for all the volunteers.

      >   We received $1,394 for the Pancake Breakfast on the day of the event and have     spent $469.60 for a net of $924.40.  Funds we anticipate receiving from Biery               Cheese have not received.

                                                                  Coming events

Jan. — 10 Jeff Mann, a Red Cross worker who worked the fire lines during the recent                                California fires.

Jan. — 17 A Vietnam War vet will speak of his experiences. He went, he fought, he                                               survived.

Jan. 24 — Fire Chief Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Department.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 10, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 10 meeting held in the Fellowship Hall at Paradise United Church of Christ. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance then the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Like an ancient phoenix, Mark Sigler rose from his seat and led the Rotarians in a rousing rendition of God Bless America. Seventeen members attended the meeting; there were four guests.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood announced that he found a home for exchange student Marco, but a home               without cats is needed for Ermma, one of our female exchange students.

 

Business

Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson discussed a planned mission trip to Upper Galveston, Texas set for April 21-28. The plan is to work in conjunction with The Fuller Center of Housing who is one of the coordinators for rebuilding homes from the damage of Hurricane Harvey. Most of the houses have already been gutted, according to Anderson. Now the work will involve dry walling, painting, electrical and finish. Volunteers will take two days to travel there and two days back. There are four churches in the Houston Area that will provide housing. Local volunteers will prepare the evening meals except for Wednesday when volunteers may go out into the community to experience local cuisine. Volunteers are expected to support the volunteer cooks. There will be two large dorms, one for males and one for females. Volunteers will sleep on cots, so volunteers should bring sleeping bags or linens. Pillows will be provided, but bring your own towels. Showers and bathrooms are nearby. There are hotels nearby if you’re more comfortable with that. Volunteers are to arrive on Sunday, and the afternoon will be devoted to an orientation. They will leave the following Saturday. There will be evening ecumenical devotions at three of the local churches. Most of the worksites are within 10 miles of the churches. There is a $100 fee to cover expenses. Volunteers must provide their own transportation. Bring what tools you can.

This is a non-denominational mission and all persons are welcome to participate, but the group is limited to forty participants. For questions and registration, call the church at 330-875-2677.

The Program

            Local resident Jeff Mann shared with the Rotarians his experiences as a Red Cross volunteer working the California wild fires several weeks ago. Jeff used a narrated 7-minute film to give watches an eye witness account of the devastation. Jeff, a retired YMCA executive, was flown to Sacramento for a 14-day tour of duty providing basic Red Cross services. Upon arriving, he said he hit the Red Cross trifecta — “new friends, volunteering and helping people in need.” His unit of about 100 persons was bunked at the CalX racetrack where they slept on cots. Later, they slept in the gymnasium of Dominican University in San Rafael, north of San Francisco, with 175 other volunteers. “I was always amazed at the number of people who thanked us for helping,” he said. “That was truly humbling.” The first day out his unit was stopped due to a large hillside fire, which turned them back. They arrived in Sonoma to give out food kits, shovels and more. The next day they were headed into the St. Helena mountain area where there were 128 fire crews working. The photos of smoking foundations were scary. One day they hiked up to Montcama Road and in less than 45 minutes they helped 15 families with fire kits that included shovels, rakes, gloves, plastic tarps & bags, cleaning supplies and lots of water and Gatorade. The next day they worked at the Hanna Boys Center, a FEMA center that was set up as a one-stop disaster stop — all state and local support agencies were set up to help the residents.

“Their stories were heart rendering,” he said. “People wander around who had lost everything. There was a young mom with two small children poking among the burned rubble looking for their lost cat.” Jeff explained. “In some places the fire was so hot it melted automobiles. We got a chance to talk to the local people and I must admit I got caught up in what’s going on. I couldn’t believe that I had now gone 12 days without watching TV or reading a newspaper.”

“I would do it again,” he reiterated. “Yes, I definitely would go again.”

Coming events

Jan. — 17 A Vietnam War vet will speak of his experiences. He went, he fought, he                                               survived.

Jan. 24 — Fire Chief Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Department.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary



Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 17, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 17 meeting held in the Fellowship Hall at Paradise United Church of Christ. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance then the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Mark Sigler led the Rotarians in a singing of It’s a Grand Old Flag. That song was chosen because of the service veterans present for today’s program. Eighteen members attended the meeting along with were three guests. The guests included Jack Pollan from the Malvern Rotary Club, and Mr. and Mrs. Gary Carper, guests of Bill Wood. Gary is an Army veteran who fought in Vietnam.

Happy Dollars

·         Betty Derry gave an update of the renovation progress in the downtown building now owned by the Historical Society. Progress is slow, but sure.

·         Glenn Heiller is happy because Ken Smith is present and is making progress in his recovery.

·         Bob Hallier gave the report that he now has his Christmas gift — an Echo — up and working. (I’m assuming everyone knows what an Echo is).

The Program

Jim Edwards introduced the speaker, Charles Lee Gross, and told about his book titled Superstes Gradus that Jim has read. Jim, an Air Force veteran, was impressed with his story and invited him to present his message for a Rotary program.

The book’s title, Superstes Gratus, means grateful survivor, and is a compilation of nearly 30 years of memories of an important time in Gross’s life. The message of the story is the one year, nine months, sixteen days and 12 hours, or so, of his tour as an Army soldier in Vietnam. The WHY he wrote the book is summed up in his words on page 3 . . . “Unless you have been there . . . unless you have actually felt the sting of combat . . . experienced the fear and terror . . . it is impossible to imagine what it is like or to describe it accurately.” He writes that the purpose for writing his book and telling his story is twofold; first, to enlighten the people what was like to change an ordinary American youth into a combat soldier fighting for his country half way around the world. His second purpose is to give credit and honor the brave soldiers, buddies of his, who did not make it home. The book is filled with pictures, maps plus official and personal letters. Some of the information in this report is taken from Charles’s message to the Rotarians, and some from his book.

Charles graduated from Alliance High School, Class of 1963. He bounced around attending college at Malone and later the Canton Business College from which he received a degree in June of 1968. The draft letter came before he could return to Malone. He was ordered to report for induction on June 26, 1969.

His Rotary presentation was enhanced with 163 color slides that began with his basic training at Ft. Campbell Kentucky. The Army decided that he would make a good tank driver, and so it was. In Nam, he was assigned to the 11th Armored Calvary Regiment, also known as the Blackhorse Regiment. The unit’s battle motto was “Find the bastards then pile on.” His unit was moved to the front lines of the war.

The story, told in a chronological order, begins with Charles’s early life, his family, and the day he was drafted. Then we move to Fort Campbell, on to Ft. Knox for advanced training, and 24-hour flight to Vietnam. The story concludes with his return home and moving back into society. Just a few of the poignant stories in the book include:

* The importance of getting mail and chocolate-chip cookies from his girlfriend, Catherine Ann Holland. (He married her and they are still together after 46 years).

* He still remembers vividly the first casualty of his unit. That death was his unit’s sergeant while they were on patrol getting ready to cross a creek. There were nine fatalities in unit while he was in Nam.

* He tells of the first time he was shot at. “The bullets sounded like bees as they passed close by his head,” he said.

* His first tank was named Easy Rider, after the movie of that time.

* His favorite weapon was the 50-caliber machine gun.

* When he went to Nam his weight was 196; when he came home his weight was 156.

* His first impression of Vietnam was that it was hot and it smelled.

* He met George Patton III, the outgoing Regimental Commander.

* The last three months of his tour he drove the commander’s Jeep.

The book concludes with a section about visiting the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial in Washington. “Vets just call it The Wall,” he wrote. The following is a Biblical passage that Charles found dear. It is printed near the last page of the book.

Thru many dangers, toils, and snares

I have already come:

Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,

And grace will lead me home.

                                    John 9:25

Coming events

Jan. 24 — Fire Chief Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Department.

Jan. 31 — Assistant Superintendent of the Louisville Schools Ann Minor

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 24, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson was absent for the Jan. 17 meeting so President-Elect Wendy Harlen stepped in. Rotarians recited the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Thirteen members attended the meeting.  

Happy Dollars

·         Betty Derry gave a pitch for the Historical Society’s annual banquet mentioning that tickets were printed and now available. She also thanked the library for the use of the Old Post Office Building for the past five years.

·         Denny Valentine reported that the brochure was still in the working stages.

·         Bob Hallier reported what the library is planning now that the levy was defeated. The question is How can we best handle library services? He said the report should be ready for the community in two to three months.

·         Bill Wood said there was still a need for a home for Emma.

The Program

Allen Gress introduced the program speaker, Rich Peterson, the Nimishillen Township Fire Chief who recently returned from the Texas Gulf Coast. Chief Peterson is also an adjunct professor of Fire Science at Stark State College.

“Training first responders has been a marathon this year,” he began. “This year we have had mega snow storms, hurricanes, floods, shootings and mud slides.” Chief wanted the group to suppose what the amount of resources were needed this past year? “But what does that have to do with Louisville, Ohio?” he asked. “Well, we have to be prepared for any disaster . . . who would have thought that we’d have a structure collapse in downtown Louisville? Would the Las Vegas emergency forces think there would be one of the worst mass shootings ever in their jurisdiction?”

The truth is — we have to have a plan, he stressed. That is one of the reasons the NTFD has a swift water rescue team that gets called several times a year.“ In 1993-94, we had our first 100-year flood,” he continued. “Now we’ve accepted that floods are a fact of life in our area; we weren’t prepared then. We have to get in the game or get out of it.”

Peterson said his department now has a trench rescue team that trains with units from Canton City and Plain Township departments. “And we’re all facing the drug OD crisis.” NTFD has on average three OD calls a week. “Our resources are being tapped.” One of the problems with the drug calls is how to protect the EMS guys from accidental contact with the drug. “We keep five doses of Narcan on each vehicle, two for the victim and three for the responders.”

Peterson said he is working with Louisville Police Chief Andy Turowski and Stark County Sheriff George Maier to with state legislatures for a better defined Active Shooter policy. “We’re trying to develop a curriculum for these incidents.”

Professor Peterson said there are fewer persons studying fire science than in the past. “We used to have full classes at Stark State,” he said. “Now we have 10 or 12 in a class. Plain Township Fire used to have a long list of applicants; now they are down to 10. There’s now a shortage of trained personnel.

“The generation coming into the fire fighting business want time off, paid vacations, health care insurance — nobody wants to volunteer,” he lamented.

Cencom, Nimishillen Fire’s dispatch center, is dispatching for 25 agencies. “We started years ago with 11.” Peterson said they are getting ready to upgrade all their equipment. In answer to the question, Peterson said he advertises job openings by using social media. “There’s a lot of word of mouth, too,” he said. “The teaching young fire fighters social skills are important.”

Will there ever be consolidation? he was asked. “Sooner or later it’s coming,” he responded. “Regionalization.”

 

Coming events

Jan. 31 — Assistant Superintendent of the Louisville Schools Ann Minor

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary



Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 31, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Jan. 31 meeting and led the Rotarians in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Mark Sigler gave the prayer. Songmeister Sigler also led the singing, with exceptional flair; Rocky Top that is one of 10 Tennessee designated state songs. Twenty-one members attended the meeting.  

Happy Dollars

·         Greg Anderson shamelessly promoted the sale of Girl Scout cookies, which he swears is for his daughter.

·         Greg Parrish requested judges for the Rotary Speech Contest, which is coming up soon. Several brave members volunteered.

·         Mark Sigler thanked today’s program speaker, Anna Minor and said “Anna, we’re very proud to have you.” Mark said he was pretty sure he presented her high school diploma to her while he was president of the Board of Education.

·         Tami Kumerle reported that St. Joseph’s Care Center is 100% filled and is making it through the Flu crisis O.K.

The Program

President Anderson introduced the program speaker, Anna Minor, the Assistant Superintendent of the Louisville Schools. Ms. Minor’s power point message was complimented with a five-page color handout filled with impressive facts about the schools. For example, high school students can choose from 103 different courses including a newly formed class in broadcasting. They can earn college credit in high school, and last year LHS students earned 1,100 college credits. There are seven AP classes offered for college credit currently taken by 124 students. LHS student ACT scores are above state average and RG Drage is now partnering with Akron University so next year those students can graduate from high school with an Associate Degree. There are 56 senior and 55 junior level students attending RG Drage studying in 12 vocational areas. “Student options are really blossoming,” she said. Over ninety-six percent of LHS students graduate in four years.

Though the school’s primary concern is academics, building character is also stressed and is important. The high school has 15 sports teams with 592 kids participating. There are 23 clubs with 908 students involved. This past year the students donated over 5,000 pounds of food to the Community Cupboard. The school has a community outreach with many organizations giving students an opportunity to learn citizenship and responsible caring.

“Schools look very different than they once were,” she added. “In today’s schools, it isn’t unusual to have a variety of medical, social, emotional, of academic needs. The specialized training that is required can be intense in nature.”

The Louisville District employs one full time nurse and one LPN to care for student medical needs. There is a CARE Team composed of teachers, administrators, staff from community agencies to help with social and emotional needs. “We foster school and community collaboration to address every student’s needs so they have the support to be successful,” said Minor.

Coming events

Feb. 6 — Rotary Board meeting. 8:00 a.m.

Feb. 7 — First of the month business meeting

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

Speaker Anna Minor:
No Meeting Feb 7th SNOW!

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 14, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Feb. 14 meeting and led the Rotarians in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Songmeister Sigler was absent, so there was no song. Twenty-two members and six guests, including our three exchange students attended the meeting.  

Happy Dollars

·         Betty Derry thanked Denny Valentine for his help moving items from the Ahh Gallery to their new building.

·         Bill Wood announced he has found a new host home for Emma.

·         Jim Edwards told of attending a Minerva basketball game and noticing a picture of Mike Yeagley (one of our guests) in the school’s Outstanding Achievement board. Also, his granddaughter Kelsey broke the all-time girls basketball scoring record for Malvern High School with 1660 career points.

                                                                  Business Program

Greg Anderson, the club’s Foundation Chair, presented long time Rotarian Mike Yeagley a certificate of achievement for becoming the club’s latest Paul Harris Fellowship recipient. Mike had been an active Rotarian for over 30 years. Paul Harris was the founder of the Rotary Club in 1905 and In 1957, an award in his name was begun to honor those members who have donated over $1,000 to the foundation. “I’ve always believed in the role and mission of Rotary,” Mike said. “I’m honored to be a part of this.” Mike wife Cynthia and their daughter Jennifer were in attendance. Mike is Greg’s father-in-law.

The Program

President Jennifer Anderson introduced the program speaker, Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot. Her Honor presented the 2018 State of the City message, outlining the current status and plans of the city’s various departments. “I just want you to know what is going on,” she said.

Among the many activities of the city administration is to bring all city ordinances into the 21st Century. Speaking of the downtown empty storerooms, she said “We need to get the property owners to get somebody in them; we have to make the property owners take responsibility for the conditions of their buildings.” Fallot discussed the CRA (Community Reinvestment program) designed to provide loans and tax credits for remodeling, an incentive program open to everyone. The CIC (Community Investment Corporation) has been given some city foreclosed, unused or abandoned properties to sell and one has already been sold.

For 2018, the city has an over $14 million operating budget with 75% of the General Fund for day-to-day expenses and 25% going to the water and sewer departments. The Fire Department is busy working to obtain funding for new radios so Louisville can be on the all-county communication system by 2019. Individual phones cost $4,000 each, she said, because they must be able to withstand the intense heat of a fire. Louisville EMS runs have almost doubled from last year, she said. “We’re having difficulty keeping our squad members because our staff is not full time and without benefits. Louisville crime rate is down excepting for assaults that have gone from 15 in 2016 to 27 this past year. The city has 55 miles of paved roads and there are 9 or 10 men to keep the streets in order. So far this year, the city has used 1,100 tons of road salt. The water treatment plant will undergo some renovation and will then have the capacity for expansion. “The city received a grant for our next water treatment project,” she said. East Main Street is a state road therefore is the responsibility of ODOT. Main Street is on the state’s paving list for 2019. “We have called ODOT and asked for them to reassess the need.” She agreed that both railroad crossings need attention. “We need to go through Congressman Gibbs office for action,” Fallot said. The sidewalk repair program that requires the homeowner to repair sidewalks will continue this summer. Fallot said the downtown alley umbrella project is still a go and she hopes it will come together this summer. Current City Manager Tom Ault will be leaving in July and council is currently accepting applications for a new city manager. There is a March 16th deadline for applications. The new apartment complex on Broadway and 62 is nearly filled and there is discussion to begin the next phase.

Mayor Fallot concluded her message with a plea for all local groups, churches and organizations to work together for the common good of our community.

Coming events

Feb. 21 — Dr. Jerry Jackson will tell of his latest adventure.

Feb. 28 — Jackie Clapper, current president of the Louisville Chamber of Commerce, will discuss their agenda for 2018.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 21, 2018

President-Elect Wendy Harlen chaired the Feb. 21 meeting and led the Rotarians in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Songmeister Sigler was still absent, so there was no song. Seventeen members and three guests.  Guests were Mike Yeagley, Roger Bur and Jerry Jackson.

Happy Dollars

·         Wendy Harlen reminded the group to bring in children’s books for the District children’s book drive. “Would someone check with the Friends of the Library.”

·         Jim Edwards paid homage to Rev. Billy Graham who passed away last night at age 99.

·         Ken Smith, back in rare form, urged fellow Rotarians to bring in their Rotarian magazines for distribution.

                                                                  Business Program

There was no business to conduct.

The Program

Dr. Jerry Jackson, a Louisville Rotarian alumnus and retired dentist, spoke about his experience cross-country skiing and participating in the 43rd annual Slumberland American Birkebeiner Cross County Ski Race held in northern Wisconsin. Begun in 1973 with 35 skiers, the event has grown and now provides year around events for thousands of adventurer spirits of all ages. About 40,000 persons will show for the four-day, 16-day Birkebeiner event including over 200 racers over the age of 70. There are three aid stations along the route manned by volunteers with food and drink to keep skiers on track. The Birkebeiner Race is the largest and one of the longest cross-country ski races in North America.

Jerry, who has been cross-country skiing since the 1980s, completed the 34-mile course that runs between the villages of Cable, pop. 825, and Haywood, pop. 2,300. (That’s about the distance from Louisville to Wooster). The course runs about 2/3 uphill and 1/3 down. The cross-country program is governed by a 501C3 non-profit organization. There are courses and events for non-racing skiers, too. When skiing locally, Jerry prefers Quail Hollow Park now part of the StarkParks District.

Jerry completed the race in a little less than eight hours and he wears a special trophy tee shirt to prove it. “The race puts you to the test,” he explained. “A moment of truth for you . . . a clash between self-doubt and desire. It’s a mental transition and somewhere you begin negotiating with God. The day Jerry skied race the temperature was 34 degees with a light rain. “The rain made the course slippery so that sometimes you would slide backwards.” The trail is 60 feet wide at the beginning, but reduces to about 20 feet later on. “in the end, it comes down to two things,” he continued. “You want to win — complete the race — and you want to be safe.

       “Left arm, right leg; left arm, right leg  . . . remember, you tell yourself, you’re having fun!“

Following the race, one can enjoy a meal at the Great Hall or imbibe at the Brew-ski. Jerry brought his skis and ski boots to the meeting for the Rotarians to view.

Coming events

Feb. 28 — Jackie Clapper, current president of the Louisville Chamber of Commerce, will discuss the Chamber’s 2018 agenda.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 28, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the Feb. 28 meeting and led the Rotarians in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Songmeister Sigler led the Rotary Singers in a rousing round of the song All Together Now. Nineteen members and four guests enjoyed a meat loaf luncheon prepared by the Paradise Church women. Club members welcomed the visiting former member Catherine “Cat” Catlett.

Happy Dollars

·         Glenn Heiller announced that his grandson was accepted for admission to the University of Wisconsin.

·         Betty Derry announced that today was her husband Ron’s last day before retirement.

·         Guest Jackie Clapper said that her daughter Sarah, the current Miss Ohio, was recently on a Cruise for Cancer that raised three million dollars for the Cancer Fund.

                                                                    The Program

Jackie Clapper, the 2018 President of the Louisville Area Chamber of Commerce, was the speaker at the request of the club. The club membership had not settled on joining the Chamber this year due to a number of concerns, so the Chamber President was invited to speak. Some of the concerns included the Chamber’s lack of support for the Library bond issue; lack of support for the downtown Umbrella Alley project; moving all summer Chamber activities out of the uptown area to the previous Nimishillen Grange property; questionable cooperation and communication with local clubs and organizations such as the Town & Country Garden Club; lack of support for the local ArtsinStark plans past and future and meddling in local politics by the organization.

Clapper, after reading the Chamber’s Mission Statement, responded most eloquently with the Chamber’s reasoning.

The Chamber could not support the Library Levy because their policy is not to endorse any candidate for public office or any ballet issue. The teacher strike/board of education conflict was cited as an example of the Chamber’s neutrality. Their thinking is that each member should think for himself.

The Chamber, according to Clapper, did and currently does support the Umbrella Alley Project, but did raise the question of using tax dollars for the project.

In terms of the moving of activities to the old Grange property, Clapper said they wanted to expand with open-air markets and there was not enough space downtown. Besides, the city would only allow them 15 minutes of street closing prior to their official opening for business, and many vendors could not get set up and running in 15 minutes. That would not be a problem at the Grange property. There had been complaining about Chamber activities keeping customers away from a store downtown. Parking is a problem downtown and would not be on the Grange property. Getting electricity to the vendors is a problem downtown and will not be a problem at the Grange. According to Clapper, there are 20 vendors agreed to work the Chamber activities this summer. The Chamber members think that the township location will attract people from surrounding towns such as North Canton, Alliance and East Canton. Also, according to the President, there are only six related businesses downtown and just two would remain open in the evening. The Saturday Farmers Market is a Rotary project and will not be affected by the Chambers move. Light up Louisville will still be downtown and businesses do not have to be a member to participate in Light Up Louisville. But, according to Clapper, the annual Scarecrows On Parade project may be cancelled because the new operators of Giant Eagle will not permit it on their property. The Chamber will take charge of the Constitution Festival this year and it may be held on the former Grange grounds.

With ArtsinStark, the Chamber felt that promises made were not kept and the $2,500 they provided the first year has ended.

Regarding communication issues, Clapper said the Chamber uses email to its members and interested citizens. They also have, she called, a popular FaceBook account and they also place information fliers around the community. And don’t forget the Louisville Herald, your community newspaper. The President said the Chamber loves to communicate and if there is a breakdown in communication, to call the Chamber office.

Coming events

March 6 — Rotary Board meeting at Mike Milann’s Restaurant —8 a.m.

March 7 — Noon meeting with a business session on tap.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 7, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the March 7th business meeting and led the Rotarians in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Nineteen members and one guest attended.

Happy Dollars

·         Mark Sigler announced that Wendy Harlin would be attending the District PETS meeting and would share her experiences with the club next week. He also reminded the membership that today is Wendy’s birthday and led the members in a Happy Birthday Wendy. Her age is kept a secret.

·         Betty Derry announced that the Historical Society met their goal of $40,000 to fix the War Memorial on the corner of E. Gorgas and Mill Streets.

·         Bob Hallier said he was looking for a new, medium-sized dog for he and his wife.

                                                                    The Program

n  President Anderson said the club’s financial report through February is available on line.

n  The Grant Program for 2018 established Jason Buydos as committee Chair. The club will give either a larger grant or several smaller grants, depending on the merits of the applications. The club earmarked $5,000 for the program. Applications will be accepted starting in July.

n  The Rotary Board of Directors voted to not join the Louisville Chamber of Commerce for this year, but will review the Chamber’s programming over the year and make a decision at that time regarding membership for 2019.

n  Eva Roshong discussed the need for a recruitment program for new members. This year, she said, Rotary worldwide had more clubs, but less members. “We need a strategy for recruitment,” she said.

n  A work session for the Flag program will be held sometime, to be determined, in late April or early May. Jerry Dunbar will step up for the job Ken Smith has done since the program was initiated nearly 10 years ago. Ken, now in his eighth decade, has retired.

n  A discussion of possible long-term community projects was held with more discussion coming later.

Coming events

March 14 — Wendy Harlin will share her experience at the PETS conference. Update on a possible long-term project.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 14, 2018

President Jennifer Anderson chaired the March 14h meeting and led the Rotarians in the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Songmeister Mark Sigler led the singing of a 4-part round of Row, Row, Rotary. Nineteen members and four guests attended. Guests included two of the four RYLA students, Kati Schlessel and Daniel Rich. Representing First Commonwealth Bank were Darla Walters and Jessica Capo.

Happy Dollars

·         Ken Smith asked for volunteers to place Rotarian magazines in local doctor’s offices waiting rooms.

·         Betty Derry announced that the Historical Society’s new building project had a positive inspection of its electric service and can now move forward with dry walling. She also updated the members with information about a regional meeting of historical societies that met in Louisville. Things are going to happen downtown, she said.

·         Eva Roshong is happy there will be two new grandchildren in her family this year.

Business

n Greg Parrish chaired the Rotary 4-Way Contest for the LHS students. He announced the winners. There were five contestants with the winner Dylan Hoover. The judges were Wendy Harlan, Eva Roshong, Bill Wood, Ted Burwell and Denny Valentine. The contest has been an annual project of the club for at least the last 20 years; no one knows for sure when it began.

n Al Gress and Mark Sigler discussed the progress for a long term community project along with tales, some humorous, of previous community projects. When President Anderson closed the meeting, she referred to the meeting as “A day of big dreams.”

n Eva Roshong discussed how local club contributions to Rotary International can gain us grants for local projects. This year’s grants were used to fund the four RYLA students.

The Program

Both Kati and Daniel talked about their experiences at the RYLA conference held at the Avalon Conference Center in Warren. The theme of the three-day conference was developing leadership skills. “There were a variety of people there,” Kati said. “Liiving living with strangers first made me skeptical, but it turned out to be a great experience.” About 90 students came from all over the district to attend the meeting, the schools extending from Youngstown to Wooster. “The experience definitely opened my eyes,” said Daniel. One of the activities was sitting in a group and talking about the problems of society, according to Kati. “But we really did not get political.”

Kati plans to attend Ohio State University after graduation and study to become a physician. Daniel also prefers Ohio State but is still looking at options for his career.

Coming Events

March 21 — One of the exchange students will share his/her experiences. (Bill Wood is out of town and I’m not sure which student he has planned for the program.)

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary


Meeting March 21 canceled for snow

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 28, 2018

Filling-in for other club officers who were away over Easter Vacation, Allen Gress led the March 28 meeting. The 17 Rotarians in attendance recited the Pledge of Allegiance, the Rotary 4-Way Test and Mark Sigler gave the prayer. Jack Pollen, a guest from the Carrolton Rotary Club, led the singing of God Bless America. Foreign exchange students Prachi Patel and Marco Paulovich attended the meeting.

                                                                  Business Program

n Bill Wood shared his experience at the National Rotary conference for leaders of exchange students held in Omaha, Nebraska several weeks ago. He said he enjoyed meeting other Rotarians who attended, many from around the world.

n  A thank-you letter from RYLA participant Daniel Rich was read.

n  There was a brief update on the club’s possible long-term project.

The Program

Foreign exchange student Marco Paulovich presented a program illustrated by a short film of Argentina, his native country. The film highlighted the many beautiful aspects of South America’s second largest country. Marco began his message with a geography lesson followed by discussing the Argentine culture and economy. Farming is a major contributor to the country’s economy. Beef cattle, sheep, alpacas along with apples, pears, corn, rice, tea, tobacco, soybeans, wine and yerba mate are major items grown or raised for home or for export around the world.

Marco’s home is located in the city of Cinco Saltos, with a population of about 23,000, and located in central Argentina. The beautiful Pellegrini Lake is nearby and hosts active commercial fishing and tourist industries. There is a large-scale mining industry in the country.

The nation’s capitol is Buenos Aires, a bustling city of over two million persons. The city boasts of exquisite Spanish-European architecture. Argentina’s government is a democracy.

Marco’s mother, a former exchange student to America, is an accountant; his father Carlos is an agronomic engineer. Marco has two sisters ages 11 and 5. At the private Christian school he attends he studies physics, chemistry, psychology, Spanish and English. After school hours he enjoys his guitar and playing volleyball. His sponsor is the Cinco Saltos Rotary Club.

Marco will be here until late June then will travel to California with a Rotary group before returning home.

Coming events

 

April 4 — Business meeting

April 11 — one of the other two exchange students

April 18 — The third exchange student

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by, Allen Gress, Secretary



Picture of Marco Paulovich, exchange student from Argentina

Picture of the 4 Way Test contest. Judges and contestants