Louisville Rotary Meetings 2017     
3rd Quarter
PAGE DOWN - to get to the NEWER minutes!

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

July 12, 2017

At her first meeting as the club’s 2017-’18 President Jennifer Anderson was warmly welcomed as she opened the meeting with 17 members and four guests in attendance. Guests included LHS graduate Luke Shephard, his parents Dwayne & Amy, and Eva Roshong’s daughter Sarah. Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer, the Pledge was offered and Happy Birthday was song for Ken Smith’s 80th marker. And many more . . .

Happy Dollars

* Bob Hallier was happy to be passing on the treasurer’s job to Justin Kuhn, but did admit sometimes “It was fun!”

* Betty Derry reminded everyone the August Historical meeting is Tuesday, August 8 at the Beech Mennonite Church. For a 2nd buck she said the Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society’s new old building had its new sewer line connected this week.

* Cynthia Kerchner said the July Farmer’s Market had more vendors than ever. She said the contents of her business are being auctioned off in an on-line auction held by Kiko Auctions. “Please bid,” she reminded everyone, “so I don’t have to move everything home.”

* Jen Anderson announced there was an open house at the YMCA for retiring John Ianigro, Thursday, July 29 from 1 to 3.

Business

n Bob Hallier passed out his last 8-page financial report that showed $57,669+ income and $39,588+ expenditures. All the 2016-’17 transactions are on a thumb drive he passed on to Justin Kuhn.

n  Citizen of the Year. Al Gress and Wendy Harlen volunteered to serve on the committee that may or may not include Greg Anderson. Al will check with Greg to see if he is interested in serving. Al will send a press release to the Herald requesting applications for the Citizen of the Year honor.

n  Eva Roshong announced there would be no Taste of Louisville this year, but the idea would be revisited in the spring of 2018. There is no appropriate venue for the event available at this late date.

n   Al Gress raised the idea to suspend the annual grant program of giving five $1,000 or fewer grants to local organizations and find one larger program where $5,000 would make a significant difference. He suggested the Historical Society’s new old building that is in the process of being remodeled. The Society has begun preparing the building by stripping the inside and having blueprint plans prepared. A new sewer line has been installed. One of the needs is for a new furnace. Someone has donated a useable furnace, but the Society needs to provide its installation.

The installation involves removing and disposal of the old unit, attaching the new furnace to existing the gas line and electric service plus replacing venting to a chimney. There is no ductwork in the building. (The old furnace was attached to one large floor register) so there will have to be new ducts and registers laid throughout the building. The project will include 2 thermostats.

After a 15-minute Q & A session, a vote was taken to accept this as the club’s 2017 community project up to $5,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:05.
Submitted by,
Allen Gress, Secretary
Dwayne, Luke and Amy Shepard

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

July 19, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson had to attend a meeting for her job so Past President Mark Sigler and President-Elect Wendy Harlin took over. Of course, with Mark at the podium, singing was a requirement so the song dejour was On the Road Again. There were 16 Rotarians attending along with 3 guests. Club minutes readers will note that the number of Rotarians attending weekly meetings has dropped over the summer. Guests were foreign exchange students Ana and Theo for their last meeting before returning to their homes next week.

Happy Dollars

* A near speechless Betty Derry thanked the members for their support demonstrated last meeting for the heating system for the Historical Society building project. “Please come see what we’re doing,” she said. “You are always welcome.”

* Mark Sigler told the story of how his granddaughter Lexie is currently in Venezuela visiting with our last year’s exchange student Sophie. The two had become close friends during Sophie’s stay her. The trip was a graduation present to Lexie from his grandparents.

* Justin Kuhn reminded Rotarians of an opportunity to rapel top to bottom from a downtown Canton building for just $25. This is a fundraiser for the Big Brothers-Big Sisters Foundation.

The Program

Denny Valentine introduced the program speaker Jeff Zucal who is the owner of Sky Sweeping located in the previous Chrysler-Jeep building on West Main Street. Jeff, a graduate of Mount Union University, purchased the building a year or so ago and is currently doing extensive remodeling both inside and out. Within the next few weeks the company will undergo a name change to Sweeping Corporation of America. Jeff works in partnership with his brother John who retired from the Navy with marine engineering experience. John keeps the vehicles tuned and repaired.

Jeff began his business career as a stockbroker for Merrill Lynch. He purchased Bud’s Corner in 2002 and kept it for 10 years while expanding his street sweeping business. Jeff tells how he was at Belden Village at three in the morning and he watched a sweeping truck cleaning their parking lot. He began researching the commercial sweeping field and found only four companies in northeast Ohio. He developed a 5-year plan that he completed in one year. Getting the contract to do Wal Mart’s Stark County stores was important for his rapid growth as was a contract with Timken. His company also does the sweeping work for the Akron school system and the Perry Schools. He recently purchased a sweeping company in Circleville, south of Columbus, and has satellite operations in Pittsburg, Columbus and Indianapolis. With their 32 trucks they do 4,000 parking lots a week. The company, which does most of their contract work at night, has three mechanics and over 20 staff members. “We’re 24/7,” he explained.

In 2013, Jeff hooked-up with a New York private equity firm and combined his company with another, but is still manager of the company’s northeast Ohio operations. The new company will keep many of its operations in Louisville and Jeff, in the future, sees the showroom full of staff personnel. Sweeping Corporation of America was doing $20 million a year in business not long ago but last April we were up to $60 million. He hopes the company will be doing $100 million by April of 2018.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by,

Allen Gress, Secretary
Jeff Zucal, our speaker:

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

July 26, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson opened the meeting with the Pledge and the Rotary 4-Way Test. Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. There was no singing in the air this week. Fourteen members and a guest attended the meeting.

Happy Dollars

* Ken Smith noted that Glen Hellier has a birthday, but no one knows which year it is. Rumor has it he has now passed age 40.

* Bill Wood said it was definite the club would have a exchange boy from Argentina and MAYBE another boy — depends on what transpires with the Alliance Rotary Club who is having difficulty finding a host home. Bill announced that he had already voted for the library issue.

* President Anderson urged all Rotarians to get out and vote for the library issue at the special election Aug. 8.

* Dave Yeagley discussed the progress with the downtown alley project. Local developer Steve Coon has purchased the old P&G Dime building located on the west side of the alley. Coon’s plans for the building are not known, but it will easier for the alley project to continue after he takes possession of the property. The city wants to replace the storm sewer line that runs down the middle of the roadway before paving is done, so who knows when that will happen.

Other Business

There was discussion of passing on used Rotary magazines to the high school and the Y. Eva Roshong volunteered to be the go-to person for your magazines.

The Program

Denny Valentine introduced the program speaker Ms. Kaitlyn Cook, a senior accountant discussed fraud prevention and other white-collar crime. Cook is a CPA, a certified Forensic Fraud Investigator and is a member of the Alliance Rotary Club. The Alliance firm HBK located on E. State Street currently employs her.

She began her discussion with the various types of fraud that range from sophistic bookkeeping schemes, accepting kickbacks, bribery, economic extortion, false billing, inventory manipulation, net worth fraud, concealing liabilities and outright stealing. Ms. Cook said that financial fraud amounts to $6.3 billion each year. Most people who commit financial fraud are first time offenders and see themselves as good people. Tipsters report over 40% of financial fraud, 16% is found from internal audits, 3% by external audits and 6% by accident. To prevent financial fraud take these steps: Segregate duties that involve handling money; have management review; mandate employee vacations; require dual signatures, but the best advise is “trust but verify.”

Traditional auditing will decrease over the next years, but forensic audits will increase.

 

Coming events
Aug. 1 — Rotary Board meeting, 8 a.m. at Mike’s Milann’s Restaurant
Aug. 2 — Regular Business Meeting
Aug. 16 — First Rotary Social get-together at Bud’s Corner 5 to 7:30. Order from their menu.
The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.
Submitted by,
Allen Gress, Secretary

Speaker, Kaitlyn Cook

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

August 2, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson opened the meeting with the Pledge and the Rotary 4-Way Test. Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Songmeister Mark Sigler led us with the hope of building a fire under the Indians — the Cleveland Tribe — with the song Take Me Out to the Ballgame. Fourteen members and a guest attended the meeting. In town from the Minerva Club, Reggie Stolzfus was a guest.

Happy Dollars

* Betty Derry kept the dollar pot growing with thanks to Jim Edwards who, with two helpers, removed the furnace from the Derry Building, the future downtown home of the Historical Society. Jim gave gentle encouragement to the dismantling process with a sledgehammer to the side of the steel boiler. For another buck, Betty reminded the membership of the photo contest coming this fall.

* Mark Sigler reassured members that his granddaughter returned safely for a week in Argentina.

* Cynthia Kerchner reminded everyone to get out and support the Farmer’s Market this Saturday morning.

* In answer to Jim Edward’s question, Dave Yeagley discussed the progress with the downtown alley project. Local developer Steve Coon has purchased the old P&G Dime building located on the west side of the alley. Coon’s plans for the building are not known, but it will easier for the alley project to continue after he takes possession of the property. The city wants to replace the storm sewer line that runs down the middle of the roadway before paving is done, so who knows when that will happen.

Other Business

President Anderson said the Chamber of Commerce and the library have asked the club to grill hot dogs for the Friday, August 25 First football game. Getting workers isn’t the problem; getting 2 grills is. The subject will be back on next week’s agenda.

Denny Valentine said he is preparing new signs for the Constitution Day parade.

Ken Smith reminded Rotarians to bring the monthly Rotary magazines so they could be distributed to waiting rooms in the community.

Coming events

Aug. 9 — Rotary District Governor will present the program. Members are reminded to bring a guest and wear the blue Rotary shirts

Aug. 16 — First Rotary Social get-together at Bud’s Corner 5 to 7:30. Order from their menu.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

August 9, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson opened the meeting, noting our special guest Rotary District 6650 Governor Mike Raulin. Jennifer led the Pledge and the Rotary 4-Way Test while Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Songmeister Mark Sigler put a little extra gusto into leading the group in singing It’s a Grand Old Flag in honor of the Rotary Flag Program. District Lieutenant Governor Theresa Linder was also present. She is from Minerva. There were 25 persons present including four guests.

Happy Dollars

* Betty Derry reminded everyone the Farmer’s Market is this Saturday and the Historical Museum and the AHH Gallery will be open so stop in a say “hi”.

* Theresa from Minerva thanked the club for the get well card we sent her a year ago following a bad traffic accident.

* Cynthia Kerchner reminded everyone to get out and support the Farmer’s Market this coming Saturday morning and thanked everyone for voting for the library levy. Remember, she said, “The Farmers Market needs more shoppers.” Unfortunately, the library levy needed more support, too.

* Arden Lingenhoel reminded Rotarians there would be a celebration for Miss Ohio — Louisville’s own — Sarah Clapper a week from Friday at the Eagles Hall. We are all welcome.

* Dave Yeagley informed the group that the Veteran’s Equestrian project on Meese Road was nearing completion.

Other Business

President Anderson said the Chamber of Commerce and the library have asked the club to grill hot dogs for the Friday, August 25 First football game. Getting workers isn’t the problem; getting 2 grills is. The subject will be back on next week’s agenda.

Denny Valentine said he is preparing new signs for the Constitution Day parade.

There is a sign-up sheet for volunteering to work the parade.

The Program

President Anderson introduced Mike, a Rotarian in the Canfield Club. He thanked Jennifer for the tour of Louisville to see some of Rotary’s projects over the past years. “What I saw is making the world a better place,” he said.

Why did he first join Rotary? “I liked the people I met there,” he said. “And I was asked to join.” He suggested that members to really understand Rotary, they should get beyond the local level. “And go to the District activities,” he added.

Raulin was especially excited about the Rotary International conventions. “Attending changed my life,” he said with all sincerity. He talked of visiting many of the 400 local booths of various clubs from around the world. “We’re doing amazing things starting with your local community.”

Raulin encouraged our club to do three things: explore Rotary, share Rotary and enjoy Rotary. One of his stories was Rotary’s involvement in the Katrina clean up in New Orleans. “Four years later most other agencies were done and gone, but RI was still there. Our goal was to get all the libraries up and running and we did.” He talked about drilling water wells in Africa, teaching the residents to fix pumps and teaching them to save money to buy worn out parts as needed. “Within one year of well water, children deaths were cut in half,” he said, then telling how the animals fouled the water so the residents had to be taught to take water to the animals, not allow the animals to come to the water.

“Thirty years ago, we decided to do something about the disease of polio, he continued, and we have inoculated some two and a half billion children. So far in 2017, there have been only 8 cases of polio. We can be proud of this.”

According to Raulin, an organization called Charity Navigator evaluates charities worldwide. That organization gives Rotary International a top rating every year. “That’s because Rotarians are pretty good at arm twisting and getting volunteers,” he said. “Rotary International gets the most bang for the buck.”

His last suggestion: Have 3 or 4 guests for every meeting . . . Rotary will sell itself.

Coming events

Aug. 16 — First Rotary Social get-together at Bud’s Corner 5 to 7:30. Order from the menu.

Aug. 23 — Noon meeting.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00.

Submitted by Allen Gress, Secretary
Mike Raulin, Theresa Linder and Jennifer Anderson




Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

August 30, 2017

President Jennifer Anderson opened the meeting with the Pledge and the Rotary 4-Way Test. Song Meister Mark Sigler turned Prayer Meister and gave the prayer. Eighteen members and a guest attended the meeting. Barb DeJacimo was our guest.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood said it was definite the club would have an exchange boy from Argentina and a girl, Emma, from Germany.

* Jim Edwards, who has a daughter living in Houston, informed the members that she missed getting flooded because her house sits on a hill.

Business

It was discussed and a decision was made to have a fund raising drive Friday night at the football game with the funds going for Houston flood victims. We are planning to partner with a Rotary Club in Houston, a club that former Louisville resident Tom Jackson belongs to. (Tom is the uncle of Wendy Harlen and the brother of former Louisville Rotarian Jerry Jackson) Rotarians will bring buckets to the game, stand outside the stadium near each entrance, and collect donations. It is suggested each Rotarian wear his blue Rotary shirt and meet at 6 pm in front of the main gate. Denny Valentine will make 12 signs for the event. The slogan will be Help bail out Houston.

The Program

Denny Valentine introduced the program speaker Jim Cassler, the CEO of the Lincoln Highway Association. Jim said he was called on the spur of the moment and put the program together in two hours. (Turns out it was a great program).

The 2-lane Lincoln Highway, referred to the Main Street of the Nation, is the first transcendental road and runs from Times Square in New York City to San Francisco. It’s also hosts the biggest garage sale in the nation.

It all began in 1913 when a group of industrialists envisioned a continuous improved highway running from the Atlantic to the Pacific, open to traffic of all description, without toll charges and to be a memorial to Abraham Lincoln. Akron’s John Seiberling, founder of the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, had a major role in the planning. The Highway would be completed by 1915 so persons could drive to the 1915 Worlds Fair held in San Francisco. The route, in some places used existing stretches of roadway, would run 3,389 miles. In the 1920s, the government took over the roads and gave them numbers. The Lincoln Highway became US 30 through Ohio, but in some states it has other numbers. In those early years, the federal government had no interest in constructing roads because the country had a good railroad system. However, during World War I, the government became aware of the value of an interstate highway. One of the early Army personnel who championed the road was a Lieutenant Dwight Eisenhower.  Later, as President in the 1950s, he was the one who pushed for and got approved the Interstate Highway Act that build today’s interstate highway system. Today, I-80 pretty much follows the Lincoln Highway.

Between 1913 and 1928, several changes were made to the route. Workers used materials close to the area under construction and in our area; the roadway was paved with bricks manufactured in northeast Ohio. The longest stretch of brick roadway, Baywood Street in Paris Township, just south of East Canton is still in use today. (It’s over 100 years old). It should be noted that the entire cost of the Lincoln Highway was born by private companies and no tax dollars were used.

In 1928 the Lincoln Highway was marked with 3,000 concrete posts set by Boy Scouts across America and set on the same day. Today there are just a few of those original markers left; two are in the East Canton area.

In 1996 a national headquarters was established in Franklin Grove, Illinois to promote and protect the Lincoln Highway. The Lincoln Highway Association’s (LHA) goal is to identify, preserve, and interpret the history of the Lincoln Highway and to prevent further deterioration, destruction or alteration of the remaining sections of the highway.

Coming events

Sept. 5 — Rotary Board meeting, 8 a.m. at Mike’s Milann’s Restaurant

Sept. 6 — Regular Business Meeting

The meeting was adjourned at 1:05.

Submitted by,

Allen Gress, Secretary




Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

September 6, 2017
President Jennifer Anderson opened the meeting with the Pledge and the Rotary 4-Way Test. We opted for relaxing lunch music instead of singing a song - although it is still unknown if our fearless song meister noticed the Beatles tribute.

 

There were three happy dollars: 

1) Glenn Heiller just returned from a fantastic 5,000 mile trip where he saw the total eclipse, Yellowstone NP, and Montana. 

2) Cynthia Kerchner reminded everyone of the Farmer's Market this Saturday morning. We are expecting a great vendor turnout, so let's fill the streets with citizens. 

3) Arden Lingenhoel informed us that the Chamber will have a memorial procession starting at 3pm (line up) at Metzger's Park on September 11th.  The route ends at the Constitution Center, where a dinner will be held at 6pm - free for veterans.   

The club then discussed the following issues:
Hurricane Response: Bill Wood motioned to send $1000 now through Rotary International. Mark Sigler seconded.  All approved. We may seek additional funds or projects based on the path of Irma, and/or Rotary partnership projects. One idea was to take donations at the Pancake Breakfast (or send a portion of the proceeds, beyond our donation to Polio Plus) and/or find a more active way to help. 

Community Banquet: The Citizen of the Year has been decided.  Please let Wendy Harlan know if you are attending for our Rotary tables. 

Parade:  The planning committee will email out if a brief parade planning meeting is needed next week at noon.  Otherwise, plan on attending the Community Banquet. Denny Valentine will make signs to better direct drivers and floats behind the high school.  Greg Anderson suggested that we request street barriers from the police to block traffic from Miday.  Last year, the human chain barrier had limited success.  We will meet on Saturday, September 16th at 5pm to put out space markers for the floats. Please attend. 

Flags: Jim Edwards sternly reminded us to call Ken Smith if we cannot have flags out on the scheduled post days.  We received several calls from residents this past Friday complaining that they did not have flags posted. 

Candidate Night: It was suggested - and appeared to have majority support - that if the Rotary Club hosts a candidate night, it needs to include all local candidates, and not just specific races to be beneficial to the community.  Dave Yeagley is getting more information about possibly partnering with another organization.  We are also going to contact our District Governor to see if it is okay to host, since Rotary by-laws ban political election speeches. This furthered the view that all races should be included for this to be acceptable.  Jim Edwards motioned that each candidate would receive 3 minutes on the floor.  No one seconded.  More information will be had in the next few meetings.  

FUN: In a pleasant turn of events, Cynthia Kerchner is planning a Family Night for Rotarians.  She has rented the covered pavilion at Metzger's Park and will provide hamburgers and hot dogs. This will take place at 5:30pm on September 27th (instead of a noon meeting).  Please bring a covered dish - first part the alphabet sides, and second part of the alphabet desserts.  Bring children, spouses, or your favorite corn hole ringer.  Mark Sigler motioned, Jason Buydos seconded.  

Finally, the date of our Christmas Party will be December 6th.  Ho, ho, ho. 
Wendy Harlan
Pricing Manager
Safety Coordinator
H-P Products, Inc
2000 West Main St.
Louisville, OH 44641

The Constitution Banquet was attended by most of the Rotarians (3 tables)
Mark Sigler was named Louisville Rotary Citizen of the Year!
Congradulations to Mark!

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

September 20, 2017

President-Elect Wendy Harlan chaired the meeting due to Jennifer Anderson’s absence. Wendy opened the meeting with the Pledge and the Rotary 4-Way Test. Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Seventeen members and a guest attended the meeting. Barb DeJacimo was our guest.

Wendy thanked Glenn Heiller for taking charge of the parking/line-up crew for the Constitution Parade last Sunday. Every thing went smoothly, she said. She also congratulated Mark Sigler for his selection as Louisville Citizen of the Year.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood said the parade went well and he was happy he didn’t end up in an ambulance like last year.

* Mark Sigler thanked the members for their support and fellowship for his Citizen of the Year selection.

* Jim Edwards, being the proud grandfather, told of how his granddaughter who is a student-athlete at Malvern High School had 30 “kills” in last week’s volleyball game which he thinks is a school record.

* Barb Delacimo said her daughter was on one of the Caribbean islands and survived the hurricane.

Business

n The Plain Rotary Club is sponsoring a horse show at the new Military Center farm on Meese Road this Saturday. Could our club provide 6 24-can/bottle cases of pop and water along with several bags of ice? Also, they had a need for volunteers to work from 10 till 1. Jim Edwards made the motion to provide the beverages; seconded by Ken Smith and the membership voted unanimously to pitch-in. Eva Roshong volunteered to help.

n Wendy reminded everyone there would be NO luncheon meeting next Wednesday (September 27). Instead, there is a family picnic planned for 6:00 at Metzger Park, Pavilion 1. Bring a side dish or a dessert. We got the meats! There will be games, good food and good fellowship.

n Ken Smith reminded the flag team that flags are due back in the barn by tonight. There would be a pickup of the 50 flags in the downtown green space after the meeting and Rotarian magazines should be placed in local doctors’ and dentists’ office waiting rooms.

The Program

Denny Valentine introduced the program speaker Roland Hatchett from the Summit, Stark, Medina County Big Brothers-Big Sisters Program. Speaking from his heart, he said the Big Brothers/Big Sisters Program is a mentoring program for kids ages 6 to 18 facing adversity. The interaction is one to one with the goal to change lives. The “Bigs” attempt to build self-confidence in the child, teach how to avoid drugs and alcohol, and to teach the child how to handle emotions. It is expected the Bigs will meet with their child at least four times a month. Most relationships formed in the program run for two to three years. You must have transportation to participate.

To become a Big, one must undergo an extensive background check with references. Currently there are over 100 actively matched pairs with another 140 kids on a waiting list.

Their office is located at 50 S. Main St. in Akron and has been in the child service business since 1972 and has included Stark County since 2013. Their phone number is 330-376-6503. Hatchett said that the younger generation of adults has not taken a hold of the need and older adults and those involved in churches or community organizations still have the values the organization is looking for.

The organization also has a site-based after school program to help youth with their schoolwork. Hatchett said the difference in this program from other youth programs is the depth of background checks for the Bigs. “Our biggest concern is the safety of the child.”

The success rate for the programs? There has been a 60% improvement over a year in a child’s school grades, 47% in truancy rates and a 37% improvement in parental trust.

Coming events

Oct.3  — Rotary Board meeting, 8 a.m. at Mike’s Milann’s Restaurant

Oct. 4 — Regular Business Meeting

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00

Submitted by,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Sept 27 was a Rotary Social at Metzger Park Pavilion
Great showing for the presentation of Paul Harris Fellowships to:
Bill Wood and Mary Edwards
Eva Roshong gratiously bought the wine the Club auctioned off.