Louisville Rotary Meetings 2017     
2nd Quarter
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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 5, 2017

At its April 5 business meeting the Louisville Rotary voted unanimously to fund all seven-community applications for grant money. A total of $5,000 was given. The money is a portion of the funds from the club’s Flag Leasing Program. Over 1,500 local residents contracted with the club at a charge of $30 for the installation of American flags for the six national holidays from Memorial Day through Veteran’s Day. It should be noted that all the grant applicants were approved. Grant recipients will be asked to attend a future program and discuss the progress of their project. The following grants were given for the 2017 year:

Louisville YMCA   $1,000

Town & Country Garden Club  $500

Louisville Public Library  $1,000

Friends of the Library  $1,000

Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society  $500

Kidwatch  $500

Junior Achievement  $500

President Mark Sigler opened the meeting and a prayer was given by Paradise Pastor David Anderson. Members recited the Rotary 4-way Test and pledged Allegiance to the flag. With Mark’s leading the way waving his old baseball bat, the club sang Take Me Out to the Ballgame. There were 16 members in attendance.

Happy Dollars

* Special congratulations were given to Pastor Anderson who was notified the same day that he had successfully completed his doctorial exams and is now a Ph.D in Theology. He has been a graduate student at Liberty University in Virginia.

* Jason Buydos is happy because the community came up with the $16,500 necessary to put the ballot issue for a new library on the August Special Election ballot. The library will not use any of their resources for the special election. Members of the community came forward and offered their help and their offer was accepted.

* Dave Yeagley reported the on again-off again Bowman Alley project has been approved by the city. Councilman Rick Guiley has pushed for the project. The alley will be vacated and improvements will be made that will allow for pedestrian use only and the space will be available as a venue for downtown activities. Among the changes will be umbrellas crossing the alley opening. The burned portion of the old Penney Alley building is to be torn down and that area can be used for parking or other things.

* Bill Wood is happy a new host family was found for our exchange student from Mexico, but a new home for the young man from France is still needed.

* Bob Hallier gave the 7-page financial report. The club’s ending balance for the month of March is $17,491.68. A number of club members have not paid their dues yet and statements for the flag program are going out this week, so Bob expects the balance to increase. The club has not given the $5,000 to the library project for 2016 and the same amount is in the 2017 budget. It was discussed and decided to prepare a check for $10,000 and present it to a library official during a photo op. It was approved.

The Business meeting

The following items were discussed/acted upon:

·         Jim Edwards shared the story of a previous flag family who disagreed with the Rotary International’s decision to not support any activity that advocates or protests private ownership of firearms. He also emphasized that the club should not endorse anything political nor give funds to individuals unless that money would go for the common good of many.

·         The Budget Committee will look at a request for a donation to the War Memorial Restoration Project.

·         Heard that this year’s Farmer’s Market would be the 2nd. Saturday of each month beginning in June.

·         Heard that Bill Wood and Dave Yeagley would be representing Louisville at the District Conference coming up the end of April.

·         Eva Roshong will serve as the chair for this year’s Taste of Louisville. The dates and location at still up in the air. One idea is to hold it in the downtown district in the renovated alleyway next to the old Penney Alley building. Dave Yeagley, who is on the committee to develop the alleyway, said the project is scheduled to be completed and ready to use by mid-July. Decisions will be made over the next few weeks.

Upcoming Events

April 12 — Louisville Police Chief Andy Turowski. His topic will be about guns.

 

The meeting adjourned a 1:00

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 12, 2017

With just 13 members in attendance,            THIRTEEN ! President Mark Sigler presided over the meeting. He led the members in singing Rockin’ Round the Christmas Tree in honor of trees, the subject for today’s program. I was pushing for Tie a Yellow Ribbon ‘Round the Old Oak Tree. Oh, well. Maybe next week. The members stood for a prayer and the Pledges, both to our country and the one for Rotary.

Happy Dollars

* Glenn Heiller was expressive, telling of his wife’s recent surgery. She’s home and doing fine.

* Eva announced that the Alliance Rotary Club was participating in Business After Hours program April 26 at the Robertson Heating & Bath building. We are invited.

* Greg Anderson announced the spring trail clean up for Saturday morning, April 22. Meet at his home in Park Village. He will have donuts and legal beverages. Bring children, spouses or significant others.

The Program

Pat Smith, who also doubles as the gourmet cook for Rotary lunches, spoke about the Louisville Tree Commission. Pat is the Chairperson of the six-member board. Members found out that the Tree Board is appointed by council. They are not paid. The city has been designed as a Tree City for the past 35 years. To be a designated Tree City, the city must have a Tree Board, they must have a budget of $2 per thousand residents and they must hold an Arbor Day celebration. For Louisville, the money is $18,000, but up until three years ago, the money, somehow, never was spent or was absorbed into the General Fund. The Tree Board’s purpose, Pat said. “Is to make a better place for residents to live and work.” She went on to say that “We live in an urban forest and we are commissioned to care for that urban forest.”

The Tree Board meets every month. So far, they have established a set of rules for planting tress in the city, have approved an “approved tree” small, and medium and large tree list for the community and established a tree removal policy with a risk management test. Other goals include to get the Service Department employees who work the parks to attend the Tree Commission Academy in partnership with Canton and inventory and map all the city’s trees with a GPS system. That’s not mentioning the removal and planting of trees.

Part of the city’s history of tree problems is the lack of watering newly planted trees. One of the reasons is the city does not have a water truck.

Proud Tree Board accomplishments include removal of 12 trees and planting of trees of eight new trees at Constitution Park. “It’s getting the budget we need,” Smith said. “But the city has been good for us, but not much has been done (with the city’s trees) for the last 16 years.”

The goals of the Tree Board simply stated: Keeping leaves in the air. But more down to earth, the goals are to 1. Maintain the health and vigor of all trees in Louisville’s urban forest and, 2, to plant the largest suitable tree for the site selected, and 3. To achieve a fully stocked urban forest. Pat said she would love to see trees canopying across city streets.

Smith presented slides of new technology available including a tree barrier system that protects sidewalks from the roots of big trees. The system is, unfortunately, very expensive.

Members of the Louisville Tree Board include: Donna Borkowski, Polly Stieber and Dr. Michael Thomas. There are spots for two additional members, but Smith cautions that the Tree Board is a working commission.

“People who live around trees live better,” she concluded.

It should be noted that Pat Smith carries a Master Gardener certificate, and has been president of the Canton Garden Club and is currently the president of the Town & Country Garden Club that meets in Louisville.

In thanking her, Mark Sigler said, Pat Smith’s work will show no leaf unturned, no questions will stump her, no question will stress her and when replacing trees Smith will get to the root of the problem.
Upcoming Events

April 19 — Maranda (There is only one Maranda) will tell of her trip to India.
The meeting adjourned a 1:00
Respectfully submitted, 
Allen Gress, Secretary




Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 19, 2017

President Mark Sigler presided over the meeting with 19 members in attendance and welcomed Maranda Saling, who was here to present the program, and Cynthia Kerchner, back from a winter’s stay in Florida. The membership sang America, the Beautiful with voices that gave new meaning to the word beautiful.

Happy Dollars

* Justin Kuhn was thankful tax season was over.

* Bob Hallier told of how an old non-functioning oil well on his farms suddenly started producing again.

* Cynthia K. said she was glad to return to Louisville.

The Club’s Business

·         Greg Anderson announced the spring trail clean up for Saturday morning 9 a.m., April 22. Meet at his home in Park Village. He will have donuts and legal beverages. Bring children, spouses or significant others. The clean up should just take an hour or so. Eating donuts may take longer.

·         Cynthia pitched our support for the summer’s Farmer’s Market the SECOND Saturdays of the following months: June 10, July 8, August 12, September 9 and October 14. Tables are free with set up beginning at 7:30.

The Program

With her effervesent personality in high gear, Maranda shared her six-week adventure in India using power point photos to emphasize her topics. Her excitement was catchy. She began with the admonition for the Rotarians — “Don’t send your wife/daughter/grand-daughter to India alone!” she said. “In Mumbai, men outnumber women 10 to 1.” Maranda, a certified people person, did go by herself, but as her photos showed she seemed to find friends and companions where ever she went. Maranda also characterized India as “an assault on your senses — both good and bad.” The bad was illustrated by a picture of an Indian bathroom where the toilets are in the floor, basically a concrete hole with a water tank. There are called squatty-potties. Free roaming cows are everywhere. Peacocks, the national bird, lives in the wild and in the cities.

A picture of a Sikh temple fascinated her where the Sikhs feed 10,000 homeless people each day with volunteers doing the work. (Sikhism, a monotheistic religion, is the 5th largest religion in the world with over 30 million believers. They are the Indians where the men wear turbans.)

Indian weddings are taken very seriously, she said. Some weddings go on for five days. The bride wears red. Maranda attended a wedding in a village of about 2,000 residents all of whom got to eat at a wedding celebration. She mentioned that Indians pick up with their fingers.

Maranda got to ride an elephant, only experienced food sickness once, and was attacked by a group of free-ranging monkeys. The monkeys are everywhere in India and are not contained. Maranda had a bag of potato chips in the large bag she was carrying and the monkeys wanted the chips. She escaped harm by throwing her bag at them. She visited the Taj Mahal and discovered that all four sides are the same. (Maybe you didn’t know the Taj Mahal is perfectly symmetrical in every way except two tombs of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz inside the structure that are not equal because the male tomb had to be larger than the female.)

Maranda visited the Ganges River that is a water source for 20 million people. (The Ganges River is the 3rd largest river in the world by discharge and is ranked the 5th most polluted river in the world.) She said she did not go in the water. Maranda visited an outdoor crematorium where bodies are burned, a custom there that goes back over 3,000 years.

Unfortunately, time ran out and the members didn’t hear all of Maranda’s remaining Indian adventures. 

The meeting adjourned a 1:05
Respectfully submitted,
Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 26, 2017

Louisville Mayor, the Honorable Pat Fallot, presented the program for the Rotary Club’s last meeting for the month of April. Mayor Pat began by promoting the summer series of activities sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce while urging the members to join the charter bus trip to the Made in America store in Elma, New York set for Saturday, May 20. The $50 fee includes a BBQ lunch and departs from the Constitution Center on W. Main Street at 7 a.m. and will return by 8 p.m.

Mayor Pat said there is a whole schedule of activities beginning Friday, May 26 with a Festival with a car cruise-in, kid’s activities on the Library’ downtown Green Space, a Memorial service at the Doughboy Statue and an uptown Beer Garden with live entertainment featuring Country & Western singer Ricky Lee.

There are other summer events planned for June 7, June 17, July 5, August 2, August 26, and Sept. 11.

Club President Mark Sigler opened the meeting with 21 members and three guests present. Mark led the group singing — in two rounds — his favorite All together Now. Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer.

Happy Dollars

·         Betty Derry reminded everyone about the annual Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society dinner May 9 with a speaker telling the story of Elliot Ness. The $30 tickets are going fast. Call for reservations at 330-875-2829.

·         Arden Lingenhoel, current president of the Chamber of Commerce, reminded Rotarians of the Chamber-sponsored golf outing June 17 at Pleasant View Golf Course.

·         Cynthia Kershner asked for helpers with the Farmers Market. She said there are activities for children; arts & crafts planned, and a lot of new vendors will be there.

The Club’s Business

Rotary grant recipients from the YMCA, the Louisville Library and the Town & Country Garden Club were given checks for their projects.

The Program

The Mayor gave thanks to the club for cleaning the walking trail and for the flag program. “There are just a lot of positive things going on in Louisville,” she emphasized. Louisville is once again a Tree City now for the 32nd year. She and Pat Smith traveled last week to Loudonville for the Tree City award presentation. Mayor Pat talked of how Constitution Park was nearly Canadian Geese free and how beautiful the park looked with the dead tree removals and the new trees planted. A fishing rodeo is planned for the summer. She said it took two years, but the city is now moving on sidewalk replacement and repair. The city will repair/replace sidewalks along properties it owns  to kick-off the project. Homeowners will have until 2018 to fix theirs. According to Mayor Pat, the city now has a pavement plan for the city’s streets. And there’s a new look for the city’s water and sewer bills plus additional payment plans. There are changes in next year’s income tax payments due to the State of Ohio handling the income tax. Those who owe over $200 a year will have to make quarterly payments.

 

Now is the season for resident complaints about unmowed grass and cars parked in front yards. Grass must be over 9 inches in height for the city to deal with it. Cars, RVs and boats must have a current license and must be parked on the side or rear of properties.
Mayor Pat is excited about the old Metzger’s Building and the work Steve Coon’s company is doing there. The NAPA Company is set to move into the story sometime in May. The owner of the old Penny Alley building is required by law to tear down the rear part of the building that was heavily damaged by fire years ago. She said the city has $250,000 for street paving, but that won’t do all the streets that need work. “I think we need at least about $500,000 to get caught up,” she said. She said Louisville is to get a new BBQ restaurant in the vacant storefront at the corner of Reno and North Chapel. She reminded everyone the city’s annual Garage Sale is Friday-Saturday May 12-13 and the city’s clean-up is the next weekend, May 20-21.
She took a few questions from the group before wrapping up by one o’clock.
1.      What about the clean up of the debris beside the West Main Street railroad crossing? Pat said it is the railroad’s responsibility, but they have been uncooperative. She said she suggested the city load it on their trucks, drive over to the NorforkSouthern roundhouse in Canton, and dump the load on their property. The Rotarians cheered her idea.
2.      What about the pile of bricks and debris for the property located on the northwest corner of Depot and West Main? There have been unanswered complaints about the stuff.
3.      What’s going on with the idea of widening the intersection of Nickel Plate and East Main? “We have to buy another property for the work,” she said. “ODOT has scheduled repaving E. Main for 2020.”
The meeting adjourned a 1:05
Respectfully submitted,
Allen Gress, Secretary



Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 3, 2017

Club President Mark Sigler opened the business meeting with 16 members and one guest present. Tammy Kuemerle, the new Marketing Director for Green Meadows Care Center, was a visitor and is interested in joining. Paradise Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Mark led the group singing The Grand Old Flag.

Happy Dollars

·         Bill Wood, who just returned from a 3-week vacation in Arizona, said he was happy to be back in the Buckeye State.

·         Ken Smith said he was glad that Tammy Kuemerle said she would do a flag route. That means all the routes are now manned.

·         Cynthia Kershner asked for helpers with the Farmers Market. She said there are activities for children; arts & crafts planned, and a lot of new vendors will be there.

·         Eva Roshong said she was thankful that her youngest daughter was graduating from high school and another daughter was graduating from Walsh University.

·         Justin Kuhn is thankful he can fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming a T-ball coach.

The Club’s Business

n  Our club is one of four applications for a District Rotary Grant with thanks given to Bill Wood for doing the paperwork.
n  Reminder: our installation dinner is set for  June 21 at Skyland Pines. Our flag volunteers, exchange students and their hosts are invited as our guests. There will be no meeting on July 5.
n  Treasurer Bob Hallier reported that our grants have been paid.
n  With the help of members’ hands, flag invoices were folded, sealed and processed.
n  The 100th anniversary of Rotary will be celebrated on August 30.

Dates to remember

May 10 — Ana Belem Munoz will speak about her year in Louisville.
May 17 — Police Chief Andrew Turowski will speak about police matters.
May 24 — City Councilman Rick Guiley will speak about a new project for downtown.
May 30 — Theo Crusson will speak about his year in Louisville.
The meeting adjourned a 1:00
Respectfully submitted,
Allen Gress, Secretary

 Louisville Mayor, the Honorable Pat Fallot, presented the program for the Rotary Club’s last meeting for the month of April. Mayor Pat began by promoting the summer series of activities sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce while urging the members to join the charter bus trip to the Made in America store in Elma, New York set for Saturday, May 20. The $50 fee includes a BBQ lunch and departs from the Constitution Center on W. Main Street at 7 a.m. and will return by 8 p.m.

Mayor Pat said there is a whole schedule of activities beginning Friday, May 26 with a Festival with a car cruise-in, kid’s activities on the Library’ downtown Green Space, a Memorial service at the Doughboy Statue and an uptown Beer Garden with live entertainment featuring Country & Western singer Ricky Lee.

There are other summer events planned for June 7, June 17, July 5, August 2, August 26, and Sept. 11.

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 10, 2017

Club President Mark Sigler opened the business meeting with 17 members and four guest present. Mark led the group singing Happy Birthday for Ana. Vivian Wood was one guest, Louisville Councilperson Jonnie Aljancic and the two exchange students were also guests.

Happy Dollars

·         Ken Smith said there is a work session for flag assembly Monday, 10 a.m. at the barn.

·         Jim Edwards thanked everyone for stuffing, sealing and stamping envelopes for the flag invoices.

Program

Our 2016-2017 foreign exchange student Ana Belem Munoz from Mexico presented the program. Theo Crusson, our other foreign exchange student, worked as technical director for Ana’s power point display of colorful and informative pictures. Ana began by discussing her father’s Rotary Club in District 4100 who sponsored her. Moving on, Ana explained the tri-color of Mexico’s flag — red, green & white. Next came a discussion of the climate in Mexico, and a recounting of Mexico’s population, which is 120,000,000. September 6th is celebrated as their Independence Day similar to our July 4th celebrations. Nov. 2 is The Day of the Dead and is a family celebration. Mexicans also celebrate the Day of the Virgin de Guadalupe.

Ana lives in the city of Hermosa located in the State of Sonora in northwestern Mexico. It is about an hour east of the Sea of Cortez. The Tower of Hermosillo is a landmark and there is a large baseball stadium there and their season runs from October to January. We saw pictures of great vacation locations including Cancun, Rivera Maya, Capos and other coastal spas.

She showed delicious photos of Mexican food. Salsa and guacamole are served with almost every meal. Fajitas, Tostadas, and Enchiladas are favorite meals back home. Steak is a usual Sunday meal. Her favorite American food is pizza and boneless wings.

Ana showed pride in the pictures of her parents and two siblings — a brother and an older sister. Dancing is her passion and she works out daily to keep in shape. (With her petite frame she can power lift 250 pounds and there are pictures to prove it). Some of her photos show her in a dancing form that rivals Peter Pan. She attends a private school that is owned by her father. All students wear uniforms to school. She would like to join the staff there some day, but she is also interested in studying to be a lawyer.

Ana thanked the club for sponsoring her.

Dates to remember

            May 17 — Police Chief Andrew Turowski will speak about police matters.

            May 24 — City Councilman Rick Guiley will speak about a new project for downtown.

                    May 30 — Theo Crusson will speak about his year in Louisville.

 The meeting adjourned a 1:00

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
ana




Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 17, 2017

Club President Mark Sigler opened the business meeting with 18 members and one guest present. Mark led the group whistling the Theme for the Andy Griffith Show. Louisville Councilperson Joannie Aljancic was our guest.

Happy Dollars

·         Eva Roshong was thankful for the hot weather.

·         Jim Edwards announced that the flags would be ready to go Thursday morning the 25th.                                                                                                 

Program

Louisville Police Chief Andrew Turowski presented the program with a discussion of the state’s Concealed Carry Law (CCW) including the corrections or changes passed by the state legislature March 21 of this year. “This is a fluid law with frequent changes,” he said. In general, there is not a set state curriculum in the eight-hour required program; instead the state issued guidelines includes six hours of classroom work, two hours on the practice range. The class subjects include such basics as safe gun handling and attitude. Retired police officers with over 10 years experience do not have to have a CCW to carry a gun. Interested residents can apply at the Stark County Sheriff’s Office. People who have been convicted of most felonies’ cannot carry a gun and those with a Protection Order against them cannot carry a weapon. There are some places where one cannot carry a gun including places of worship, places where alcohol is sold, schools and government facilities. Residents can transport a loaded weapon in a car in a car with some restrictions. If stopped by a police officer, the driver or passenger carrying a gun must inform the police officer immediately. Persons with a CCW have that information on their driver’s licenses so the officer may know someone in the car has a gun and if the officer checked the license before moving to the vehicle’s window. All states surrounding Ohio except Michigan will accept Ohio’s carrying permit. If you are planning a trip to Florida, South Carolina does not accept Ohio’s gun permits. In Ohio, you must be 18 to carry a loaded rifle and 21 to carry a handgun. Ohio is not a “Stand your ground” state. If you shoot someone, for a self-defense plea you must have been in imminent danger and you must not be the one to initiate the conflict.

Following his message, Turowski took questions from the audience.

Dates to remember

May 24 — City Councilman Rick Guiley will speak about a new project for downtown

 May 30 — Foreign exchange student Theo Crusson will speak about his year here.

 The meeting adjourned a 1:00. Respectfully submitted,

 Allen Gress, Secretary


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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

June 14, 2017

Club President Mark Sigler opened the meeting with 17 members in attendance. Ted Burwell gave thanks to God and the members pledged allegiance to the flag before digging into a baked chicken lunch.

Happy Dollars

There were no happy dollars today.

Business

n President Sigler read a thank-you note from KidWatch’s Director Janet Hopkins for the Rotary grant given their organization.

n  Jim Edwards recalled the many letters and notes of thank-you he received for the club’s flag program.

n  Treasurer Bob Hallier passed out copies of the 2017 - ’18 budget and reviewed several line item changes. He made a motion to accept the revised budget, which was seconded by Al Gress. The motion passed unanimously.

n  Jim Edwards raised the issue of the giving $10,000 to the Library Board as part of the club’s $50,000 pledge toward a new facility. Jim thinks the club should retain possession of the funds until the building is under construction instead of presenting the cash now. Jim expressed dislike for special elections. There was also discussion about the presentation of the check near the time of the special election. Jim made a motion for the club to keep its promise to the library but to maintain possession of the funds until the library began construction. Al Gress said he would write an article and take a picture of the club’s gift for an article for publication close to the election. The news article would not say the funds were given; rather the $10,000 was a part of the club’s $50,000 pledge. Period. No date to be given for the transfer for money. Jim’s motion for that was approved by a vote of 13 yeas, 1 nay and 1 abstention.

n  Flag pick-up is set for June 15, 16 and 17.

Program

Ron and Betty Derry were asked to discuss the Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society — it’s past, present and future. The Historical Society was a Rotary Grant recipient and recipients are requested to meet with the club to discuss their grant.

The Derrys community involvement began, according to Betty, with the proposed sale of Molly Stark Hospital in 2009. The Derrys organized meetings and got people involved with the idea of having a county park there. The idea grew and they were successful. Nimishillen Township now has its first and only park.

Next was the 200th anniversary of the township and Betty inquired what plans the township had to celebrate. There were none, so Ron & Betty took it on themselves to organize and work a celebration. It, too, was successful and by now the Derrys were hooked with doing community services. During the Molly Stark campaign, the Derrys planned three fundraiser dinners with the profits going to StarkParks for asbestos abatement. They also put together a time capsule and began attending historical meetings in surrounding townships and towns. Along the way, they hooked up with Mike Carden and the idea of the Historical Society was hatched. Meanwhile. The Derrys also were involved in planning the Constitution Week for several years.

In meeting other leaders, Ron and Betty found out to be successful, any organization to be successful had to be a community catalyst. “We decided we needed to involve the community,” said Betty, and the Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society was born. “We had 60 paid members the first year,” said Betty. “And we have a meeting every month except July and December.”

“Well, we began to grow and we were running out of space,” explained Ron. “The Library Board rented us space in the old post office building on East Main Street. The Society had floats in the Constitution Parade and that gave the organization more community attention. “Then people began giving us things; some were valuable,” Ron added. “And our membership kept growing.”

A 15-member volunteer board one of which is a high school student governs the organization.

As time went on, the Society got involved with ArtsinStark’s 20/20 Vision Project for Louisville. “That led us to getting the Ahh Art Gallery building downtown,” said Ron. Last December 28, the Derrys took ownership of the previous Nees Pharmacy Building and are now in the process of remodeling the inside. When completed, some of the items from the old post office museum may be moved downtown. It will be a permanent home for the Historical Society.

It was commented by a member that if and when there is a project such as drywalling, painting or laying the flooring, to ask the club for help because the club needs a work project and would be interested in devoting time and energy for the building’s renovation. Ron thanked the membership and promised he would follow through.

So the Historical Society’s success story has been told. It will continue to be a vibrant component of Louisville and Nimishillen Township’s society.

Dates to remember

June 21 — The annual installation banquet at Skyland Pines. Dinner at 6. Reservations are being taken by Dave Yeagley.         

The meeting adjourned a 1:15

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
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