Louisville Rotary Meetings 2017     
1st Quarter
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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 4, 2017

President Mark Sigler called the January 4 business meeting to order with 19 members and three guests present. President Mark led the club members in prayer, members pledged allegiance to the flag, recited the Rotary Four Way Test and sang All Together Now. President/Songmaster Sigler is bound and determined the group will get that song right — sooner or later. The new Paradise Church Pastor, David Anderson, was a guest. Also attending were past Louisville outbound student Marcie Blandford and her friend Seychell. The two girls met in France, but Seychell (No last name) is now living in Mexico. Marcie is currently a third-year student at Capital University where she is studying creative writing and French.

Happy Dollars & Club Business

* Mark introduced the new church cooking staff and the ladies were given a round of appreciative applause.

* Club Treasurer Bob Hallier presented and reviewed 4-page financial report, which was approved as presented. His hard work and diligence to detail was acknowledged. (Copies are available to any member not in attendance at the meeting. See Bob or Mark.)

* Cynthia Kerchner is happy, as she is busy closing her uptown Hallmark store after 37 years. She thanked everybody and spread some Heggy’s chocolates on each table. Also, she announced that Metzger’s Hardware will soon carry Heggy’s chocolates and nuts for their Louisville customers. She also volunteered to chair next year’s Farmer’s Markets.

* Dave Yeagley unabashedly apologized for missing Tuesday’s Rotary Board meeting.

“After agitating for the change of times for the meeting from 7 to 8 am,” he confessed. “I over-slept.”

* Bill Wood told of his system shock as he returned to Ohio from vacationing in Florida where he wore beach attire. Now it is freezing!

* Mark said the Board was working on a list of candidates for next year’s officers and would have them ready by the next business meeting. Also, a list of grant applications will be ready at the Feb. 1 meeting.

* Ken Smith announced that 200 new flags are ordered and will be sent in the next week or so. Ken also said the club is short volunteers for four flag routes.

* Bob Hallier said that 140 of the 150 warm coats ordered were given to thankful children and the 10 left over will be given to the YMCA for their use as needed.

* Denny Valentine designed and printed Rotary thank-you notes and are available to any Rotarian who needs to say “thanks” to someone.

* Bill Wood raised the question as to whether our club would be sponsoring a foreign exchange student for the next school year. The question for a vote and the club members in attendance voted unanimously to sponsor one student next year.

* For Rotary’s 100th year celebration, it was decided to have an evening dinner at a restaurant. It was agreed that this dinner should be an effort to publicize Rotary activities and encourage new members. Each member is to bring a prospective member as a guest. Mark is going to check on Water’s Edge for the event. Exact details will be forthcoming.

* Chairpersons are needed for both the Taste of Louisville and the Pancake Day. There are workable plans available from successful past activities, so there is no need to reinvent the wheel.

* There was a brief discussion about the use of money from the Happy Dollars Fund. It was decided to leave that money in the account for use for club social causes. Secretary’s note: We need a Club Enhancement Fund for such things as new babies, member weddings, member funerals (yes, we have had several over the years) and other social activities that enhance the sociability of the club. We used to pass the hat, so to speak or ask members to dig in their wallets or purses. So a workable fund is much easier to access. Besides, we average only about five Happy Dollars a meeting which translates to $20-$25 bucks a month.)

The meeting was adjourned at 1:03.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 11, 2017

President Mark Sigler called the January 11 meeting to order with 19 members and four guests present. Paradise Pastor David Anderson led the club members in prayer, members pledged allegiance to the flag, recited the Rotary Four Way Test and sang  Goodbuy, Mary Lou, a Ricky Nelson favorite that was popular in 1961. (There were a few quizzical looks from younger members who asked — Who is this Ricky Nelson?) The four guests included Rick Guiley, a Louisville councilman, Judge Kurt Werren, and two representatives from the Louisville OTC plant.

Happy Dollars & Club Business

* It needs to be noted that Rotary Club President Mark Sigler, who is also president of the Paradise Church Consistory, was also elected to be president of the Louisville Board of Education for 2017. Congratulations Mark for your community spirit and, in regards to the School Board position, your courage is respected.

* More good news. Catherine (Cat) Catlett has returned and will retain her membership in our club.

* Eternal optimist Jim Edwards blew a buck to tell us he was excited about the possibility of the Cleveland Browns draft choices. (The draft will be held the last week of April.)

* The January 18 program will be presented by Canton Rotarian Rick Tucker who is the Development Manager for Junior Achievement of East Central Ohio.

                                                                        The Program

Bob Ganser, the CEO of the Louisville Division of the SGB–SMIT Group, and Bill Woost, the Director of Sales and Marketing, presented the program about their company. The SGB-SMIT Group, located on Constitution Street north of Metzger’s Hardware, had previously been known as OTC or Ohio Transformer Company. The SGB-SMIT Group is one of the leading transformer manufacturers worldwide with nine locations around the world and employs 2,400 persons.

The Louisville operation, with experience from the 1970s, is committed to the remanufacture and repair of electrical transformers. There are currently 89 employees here which includes office staff, sales and production personnel. The staff has been working two shifts a day, but Ganser said they are planning a third shift soon. “Our quality craftsmanship is a result of our culture,” according to the company’s website. “We have a veteran team of skilled specialists who know the product and take pride in their workmanship.”

Since the SGB-SMIT Group bought the company in 2012, they have poured $4.2 million in improvements and new equipment into the Louisville plant. The Louisville plant is unique due to an experienced work force, an apprentice program, a 100-ton crane and direct rail facilities that extend directly into the plant. There is now a mobile repair rig than is available for on-sight work.

In 2007, the company did $1.5 million in sales, but sales reached $12 million in 2012 and jumped to $42 million through 2015. Ganser’s goal for the year 2021 is to hit the $70 million mark.

The company has between six and eight units in production at any one time. It takes between 18 & 30 weeks to repair a failed transformer. 2016 was a slow year for the company and Ganser thinks it was because of the presidential election. “Businesses want to see what is going to happen during the next administration,” he said.

The SGB-SMITGroup headquarters is located in Regensburg, Germany and has five plants in Germany, The Netherlands, Malaysia, and two in the U.S.A. The product range includes large transformers, medium-power transformers, small power transformers, oil distribution transformers, cast-resin transformers, controllable shunt reactors, phase shifters and compact sub-stations. It distributes products in 42 countries and has customers in more than 50 countries.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:05.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary


18th ja

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 25, 2017

President Mark Sigler called the January 25 meeting to order with 21 members and two guests present. Paradise Pastor David Anderson led the club members in prayer, then Club members pledged allegiance to the flag, recited the Rotary Four Way Test and sang Happy Birthday to Maranda Saling who is back in town preparing for her next travel adventure.

Happy Dollars

* Bill Wood gave a “happy” report about the district youth exchange. The 19 inbound students and all are doing well with no known problems. There are 13 outbound students and they, too, are doing just fine.

* Maranda was welcomed back and said she was happy to be HOME.

The Business

February meeting program

Feb. 1 — a business meeting

Feb. 8 — Mr. Chris Kaboth, Vice-President for Operations, the Whitacre-Greer Brick Company. (This Alliance Company is one of the country’s largest manufacturers of paving and decorative bricks.)

Feb. 15 — Mr. Jeff Mathews, Director of the Stark County Board of Elections. (Election fraud possible in the November presidential election?)

Feb. 22 — Capital University Professor of Theatre will talk about the evolution of movie theatres during the 20th and early 21st Centuries. (The professor’s name will be kept secret until the meeting, but he has a direct connection to our club)

The Program

Mr. Ron Ponder, the morning talk radio host on WHBC Canton, presented the program. Mr. Ponder, an African-American, is no stranger to Louisville as he has worked with the Board of Education and Andy Turowski, Louisville’s Chief of Police. Ron began by thanking the club for inviting him. He shared his early childhood, living on his grandfather’s Georgia farm until he was two. But he returned summers until he was 18. He recalled the difference between southern and northern societies. He told of his first real case of discrimination when a 4th grade classmate called him the N. word. His teacher came to help him and that influenced him as he matured. That teacher’s message was “Don’t judge based on one person.”

“Despite all our problems, this is the best country in the world,” Ponder said. “Nobody is perfect and don’t paint every person with the same brush.”

Ron has three adult children, two sons and a daughter. He said he is up each day at 5:30 to prepare for the day’s broadcast. “I have two TVs on with different news programs, I get to the station about 8:30 and compare notes with the staff. The day’s agenda is set by 9:45 and by 10 the calls begin coming in.

The only current political statement he made was: “Leaders must be truthful and if the president does not tell the truth, it’s our (reporters and newscasters) duty to call it out.”

Ponder said he is a registered Republican, but he believes in the two party system. “Don’t put all of your eggs in the same basket,” is his advice. “We are all individuals, yet we’re in the same boat.”

Ron said it may seem like the whole world is going crazy, but it is not.

Other comments included:

(In politics) “I like to see what is best for our country.”

“Minorities cannot go into some place and think everyone is against them.”

“Don’t discount religion. Keep in mind, in the end, we are all going to the same place — heaven.”

 

The program was over a little after one and members gave Ponder two rounds of applause. On the way out, many members were thinking about the day’s message.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:07.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 1, 2017

President Mark Sigler is on a well-earned vacation, so president-elect Jennifer Anderson took over the gavel for the Feb. 1 business meeting with 15 members in attendance. Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer, all gave the Pledge of Allegiance and the Rotary 4-Way Test was recited.

Happy Dollars

* Denny Valentine noted for all the world that today was the exact day he purchased the car of his dreams — A Trimph TR-6 just 45 years ago. And he still has it.

The Business meeting

* Treasurer Bob Hallier gave a brief finance report. We have money. He reminded all that 1st half dues would be forth coming. Also, the Warm Coats program received a gift of $1,500.

* There was nothing to report regarding the flag program.

* The Taste of Louisville. Until this meeting, no one has stepped forward to take charge. There were five members who said they would help, but no one really said he would take charge. The issue will be on the next meeting agenda for discussion. Al Gress said last year’s beverage policy caused the loss of revenue without water for sale. “I could have sold 50-75 bottles of water,” he said. “Also, let’s not get a keg of beer; instead each member should donate a 12-pack of brew and a 12-pack of water or pop.

* Bob Hallier asked about action on community grants. The paper work is sitting on Mark’s desk and Jennifer said she would call him to see if we could get the paperwork by the next meeting.

* Bill Wood asked about a list of officers for next year and said the list was a month late. “It was due in the national office early in January,” he said. Jennifer said she would talk to Mark about it (by phone).

* Al Gress brought up the subject of entertainment for the June banquet. He pointed out that the Rotary used to have a community musical that was an annual standard and was well accepted by the community. With that in mind, why not have members – a select few — do karaoke? Five, six or seven numbers would provide ample laughter and merriment for all. He pointed out the definition of karaoke — a Japanese word that means “the process of making a fool of yourself.” We all have a lot of talent and he urged all to think about it.

Upcoming events

Feb. 8 — Mr. Chris Kaboth, Vice-President for Operations, the Whitacre-Greer Brick Company. (This Alliance Company is one of the country’s largest manufacturers of paving and decorative bricks.)

Feb. 15 — Mr. Jeff Mathews, Director of the Stark County Board of Elections. (Election fraud possible in the November presidential election?)

Feb. 22 — Capital University Professor of Theatre will talk about the evolution of movie theatres during the 20th and early 21st Centuries. (The professor’s name will be kept secret until the meeting, but he has a direct connection to our club)

There will be no Rotary Report about this meeting as nothing here needs to be in the newspaper.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:55

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 8, 2017

President-elect Jennifer Anderson took over the gavel for the Feb. 8 meeting as President Mark Sigler is still on a well-earned vacation. Ken Willett gave the prayer, the members gave the Pledge of Allegiance and the 20 members present recited the Rotary 4-Way Test in attendance. There were three guests including Paradise Pastor David Anderson and Leah and Riley Sue Roshong.

Happy Dollars

* Jim Edwards retold the excitement of this week in sports with the Patriot’s comeback victory in the SuperBowl and the last second shot by LeBron James that enabled the Cavaliers to win their game.

* Cynthia Izotic announced that she was a volunteer at the MAPS war museum and could get us a speaker for a future program.

* Eva Roshong introduced her daughter Leah visiting with new and first granddaughter Riley Sue.

The Business meeting

* Bill Wood offered the slate of officers for 2017-2018 that included: Jen Anderson, President; Wendy Harlen, President-elect; Allen Gress, Secretary; Dave Yeagley, Sergeant-at-Arms; and Treasurer Justin Kuhn. The slate was approved as presented by acclamation. In addition, Bill Wood and Eva Roshong will serve on the Club Board of Directors.

* Al Gress discussed a request by Stark County Commission Richard Regula to present a program regarding the May ballot request for the renewal of the Criminal Justice Sales Tax. It was decided that Rotary laws forbid politicians or those promoting political issues to speak at the Rotary meetings.

* Secretary Gress passed out copies of membership roster and asked members to correct any mistakes.

The Program

Mr. Christopher Kaboth, Vice-President in Charge of Production for the Whitacre Greer Brick Company, presented the program. Kaboth, a Jackson High School and Otterbein University graduate, has been with the 5th generation family-owned company for the past 10 years. The Alliance company manufactures fired-clay brick permeable pavers and firebrick utilizing the dry-pressed manufacturing process, mostly for the commercial and governmental markets. Established in 1916, by J.J. Whitacre, today the company is owned and managed by the 4th and 5th generations of the Whitacre family.  The company uses the dry-pressed manufacturing process to form all products, pavers and firebrick, and fires them in natural gas-burning kilns. The company obtains its raw materials usually within 50 miles of its Alliance plant. Many colors, shapes and sizes of fired-clay paving brick are available. Available colors range from traditional reds and browns to contemporary gray and buffs. Common sizes range from standard 4×8 pavers to the signature Boardwalk paver measuring 2-1/4 or 3-inches wide by 9-inches long by 2-1/4 or 3-inches deep. Whitacre Greer, exclusively, offers a 6-inch by 12-inch paver and a hexagon. Custom sizes, shapes and colors may be available upon request. Whitacre Greer is also a leading producer of low-duty firebrick used in the construction of residential fireplaces and in light industrial applications. Firebrick and split firebrick are available in buff and red colors and in a variety of sizes to meet specific applications. All company fired-clay paving brick and firebrick comply with applicable industry safety standards. Independent retailers throughout North America distribute Whitacre Greer pavers and firebrick, but residents can purchase second pavers directly from the factory.

 

Upcoming events

Feb. 15 — Mr. Jeff Mathews, Director of the Stark County Board of Elections. (Election fraud possible in the November presidential election?)

Feb. 22 — Capital University Professor of Theatre will talk about the evolution of movie theatres during the 20th and early 21st Centuries. (The professor’s name will be kept secret until the meeting, but he has a direct connection to our club)

The meeting was adjourned at 12:55

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
Picture of Chris Kaboth

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 15, 2017

Due to President Mark Sigler’s vacation, President-elect Jennifer Anderson was still at the helm for the Feb. 15 meeting with 19 members and one guest in attendance. Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer; all recited the Pledge of Allegiance and the Rotary 4-Way Test.

Happy Dollars

* Cindy Izotic reported that Reed Kimbell, representing the MAPS Air Museum, would     be the speaker for the March 15 meeting.

* Eva Roshong shared with the membership the news of an exciting program sponsored by the Alliance Historical Society for Feb. 27.

* Bill Wood expressed his excitement that all 19 inbound foreign exchange students and the 13 out bound students were in place and doing well.

The Business meeting

* Greg Anderson led the membership induction of Cindy Izotic and Justin Kuhn. Each was given a Rotary lapel pin and were reminded that Rotary is the world’s largest service organization.

* There was no discussion or action taken regarding leadership for The Taste of Louisville.

* There has been a formal request from the Constitution Committee for a commitment from Rotary to handle the parade as we have done for the last two years. This should be on the agenda for the Feb. 22 meeting.

Program

Mr. Jeff Mathews, Director of the Stark County Board of Elections, presented the program. Mathews began with background information reminding us that the Chief Elections Officer for Ohio is the Secretary of State. Locally, a four-person Board made up of two Republicans and two Democrats administers each county’s elections. The county board of elections (BOE) hires a director and an assistant. The Stark BOE employs 12 persons to service the election needs of about 385,000 residents who call Stark County home. Of those residents, about 250,000 are registered to vote. In the November 2016 election, 71% of Stark registered voters voted, much better than the national average, which is 62%. “We prepare for a 100% turnout,” Mathews explained. “One reason some people don’t register is that they don’t want to be called for jury duty.” In Ohio, the voting period is now 29 days and “if you listen to the press, we’re disenfranchising poor people.” According to Mathews, many states have less time for voting and some states require only one day to vote.

Stark County has 284 precincts with 145 voting locations. There are 1,440 voting machines — that were new in 2005 — with 1,400 people hired to man the voting polls. “We’re always in need of poll workers,” he said.

Mathews discussed so-called voter intimidation — the request for voter ID such as a driver’s license or a utility bill. Most counties throughout the world require a photo ID to vote. “The ID requirement gets a lot of media attention,” Mathews said. “There’s no reason we shouldn’t join the rest of the world.” To check for voter fraud, the BOE runs 10 tests for every election in front of representatives from both parties. “There are safe guards in place,” he assured us. The hacking into the system is not possible because each voting machine is a stand-alone system; it is not on the Internet. Each has its own memory card that tabulates the vote. Each machine’s memory card is only accessible with a password that is given to one Democrat and one Republican.

For the next election, the Stark BOE is purchasing electronic poll tablets where voters will swipe their driver’s license. The state is picking up 85% of the cost with the county paying15%. Don’t look for Internet voting in the future due to the possibility of hacking, he said.

Upcoming events

Feb. 22 — Capital University Professor of Theatre will talk about the evolution of movie theatres during the 20th and early 21st Centuries. (The professor’s name will be kept secret until the meeting, but he has a direct connection to our club)

March 1 — Business meeting

The meeting was adjourned at 1:05

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 15, 2017

President Mark Sigler is still basking in the sun some place so President-elect Jennifer Anderson was captain of the Rotary ship. There were 19 members and one guest in attendance. Gail Gress was the guest. Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer; all recited the Pledge of Allegiance and the Rotary 4-Way Test. It seems strange that there has been no group sing lately.

Happy Dollars

* Greg Parrish announced that the Rotary Speech contest was set for later this week and            there were five LHS students participating.

* Justin Kuhn announced the Big Brothers-Big Sisters activity for April 28. The club could sponsor a 4-person golf team to compete. The cost is $300.

* Bill Wood gave a pitch for the District 6650 conference and golf outing set for April 7    & 8 at the Avalon Inn and Resort in Warren, Ohio.

The Business meeting

* There had been a formal request from Joyce Hudnell, the President of the Constitution Committee for a commitment from Rotary to handle the parade as we have done for the last three years. The question of sponsoring the parade was raised as last year we donated $2,000 for the right to sponsor the parade.

It was moved, seconded and voted to again sponsor the parade, organize the parking and donate $2,000 to the parade. The vote was unanimous.

Program

Professor Jeffrey Gress, who teaches in the Communication’s Department at Capital University, presented the program. Professor Gress is the son of Rotarian Allen Gress. The professor discussed how Canton’s Palace Theatre reflects the history of theaters, arenas and public venues dating back to 300 B.C. during the Golden Age of Greece. Fast-forward, during the late 1880s and 90s in America, it was common to for communities to build a church first, then a fire station and third an opera house. Other inventions were changing life about the same time including the availability of commercial electricity and the film projector.

On Monday, November 22, 1926 that evening in downtown Canton, with nine other local movie theatres, a standing-room-only crowd awaited the opening of industrialist Harry Harper Ink's just completed million-dollar vaudeville and movie house. The Palace Theatre was a gift to the community from Ink, a local entrepreneur who owned the Canton-based Tonsiline Company, which manufactured a cough syrup sold in unique giraffe-shaped bottles. The two giraffe plaques located in the theatre are reminders of Ink’s product.

 

Architect John Eberson of Chicago designed the theatre. He achieved fame and fortune in the 1920s with his creation of “atmospheric” theatres in cities across the United States. Akron’s Civic Theatre is one of his works. The Palace seeks to re-create a Spanish courtyard on a mid-summer’s night with the ceiling appearing as a starry night complete with wisps of clouds that create a dream effect. The Palace still has the original cloud machine that makes clouds march continuously across the sky.

The Palace has undergone a number of renovations since the 1980s and is currently in the midst of several projects. It is regarded by Cantonians as the Crown Jewel of downtown Canton.

With time running out, Jeff’s father told how Jeff began this theatre career by working as a projectionist in a small town theatre where they lived. He was just 14 at the time. Jeff’s mother and father debated whether to allow this because of the R rated films, but in the end, Jeff’s enthusiasm carried the day.

 

Upcoming Events

March 1 — Business meeting

March 8 — Louisville Schools Athletic Director John Twinen

March 15 — MAPS program by Reed Kimbill

 

The meeting adjourned a 1:05

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary


Speech competitors for the Louisville Rotary Four way test competition.
Standing: Advisor, Chris Kamp, speech competitors; Alexis Springer, Katlyn Bennett, Dylan Hoover, Hailey Rinier, and Robert Duncan.
Seated Judges from Louisville Rotary; Greg Parrish (chairman), Eva Roshong, Ted Burwell, Ken Smith.

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 8, 2017

Of the things we think, say or do — Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned? This Four Way test has been a faith cornerstone for Rotarians and it was recited to begin our March 8 meeting. President-elect Jennifer Anderson led the Rotary meeting standing in for President Mark Sigler. There were 16 members and two guests in attendance. Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. Is the Rotary group-sing a thing of the past? Sigler, where is our Songmeister?

Happy Dollars

* Denny Valentine reminded Rotarians of the Cultural Fair at the high school, Thursday March 9. Our club, thanks to Denny, will have a booth at the fair.

* Speaking of fair booths, Eva Roshong said she will represent her business — Brad’s Carpet Cleaning — at a booth for the Stark County Home & Garden Show set for Friday, Saturday and Sunday this weekend at the county fair grounds building.

* Bob Hallier let off steam with the announcement that he had just completed his income tax forms and now feels civilized again.

 

The Business meeting

There were no new items of business discussed.

The Program

John Twinem, the Athletic Director for the Louisville Schools, presented the program. This was the 3rd time he has spoken to the club and said he enjoyed the opportunity. He decided to put discussion of the league later and began with the topic of facilities upgrade. “We’re looking long term,” he said. “What are the needs and what will we need to do to compete with higher level athletic programs?” There is discussion about a new concession area with additional bathroom facilities to be located on the northeast corner of the football stadium. But any additional buildings at the stadium must follow the same architecture as the current ones. Twinem asked our opinion of the changes for the concession area during the last football season and everyone liked the changes. The need for an auxiliary gym was cited. “We’re beginning a strategic plan for the Athletic Department,” he said. “When and if we choose a league, we want to be all in, so we need to get our ducks in a row.”

Next, the AD shared the successes of winter sports including the boys Division I cross country team that was 5th in the state meet. The boys competed without their coach. The competitive cheerleaders competed and took 5th place in Division I in state competition. The LHS wrestling team has currently three state qualifiers including the school’s first freshman qualifier. Spring sports start practicing outside this weekend.

Twinem told a special story about an evening he shared with Josh McDaniels, a former player that Twinem coached. McDaniels, a Canton McKinley graduate, is an assistant coach for the New England Patriots and the two men have remained friends. “Josh has four Super Bowl rings,” he said. “And sitting, talking to him for me is surreal.”

Now the league matter. As every Leopard fan knows, next year is the last year our school will participate in the NBC conference. So the question is — Who will we be playing beginning the fall of 2018? Louisville will go independent for the year and see how the scheduling goes, according to Twinem. Other leagues have been looked at, but at this time there are no applications out. Louisville officials looked at the All-American League, a Youngstown Area group, but felt the drive time was not reasonable. One of the schools Louisville would have to play was Ashtabula, which is a 110-mile trip one way.

The Summit County Suburban League was approached, but some of those schools felt Louisville would be too far to travel. Two schools have contacted Twinem for a football game, one Columbus Bishop Hartley and the other Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary. “Some schools do not want to play us,” he said, “and some schools we do not want to play. Most schools are already in a league and the 6, 7, & 8 spots are filled with league games.” It is possible that Louisville will look to schedule either Akron City or Cleveland City schools. Twinem said the middle school program will really get hurt. “Those games are played after school and to put kids on a bus for an hour, two hour ride one way and then back . . . how far are you willing to send them?” he said. Also, Jackson, GlenOak and other schools have multiple middle school teams so they don’t need to schedule more.

During the question and answer session, Twinem was asked if we would schedule Washington D.C. or Canadian Schools. “Only as a last resort,” he said.

 The 2018 football schedule has 7 games scheduled, but weeks 6, 7, & 8 are not filled. The Leopards will open with Canfield followed by North Canton Hoover, Green, Lake, Perry, open, open, open, Massillon and close with Central Catholic.

Upcoming Events

March 15 — MAPS speaker Reed Kimbill
March 21 (Tuesday) — Meet at Green Meadows during the 5 to 8 program. No meeting                          on Wednesday the 22nd.
March 29 — The LHS RYLA students will present a program.
The meeting adjourned a 1:07
Respectfully submitted,
Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 15, 2017

President Mark Sigler is back in the saddle and led the group in singing America the Beautiful. The Four Way test is a faith cornerstone for Rotarians was recited; a club ritual. Paradise Church Pastor David Anderson gave the prayer. There were 16 members and two guests in attendance including Cathy Daniels from H-P Products.

Happy Dollars

* Mark opened the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting with “It’s good to be back!” Also, he told how his son returned safely from a mission to Guatemala close to where the fire killed over 30 children last week.

* Ken Willet agreed. He said he was happy to be back, too.

* Al Gress informed the membership that WHBC’s Ron Ponder, who spoke to the club just two weeks ago, was fired from his job. Gress said to watch for a pushback from the community. (Three letters to the editor in today’s Repository).

The Business meeting

There was no business discussed during the meeting, but following the meeting Mark talked of holding our June banquet at the MAPS Museum. More discussion on that later.

The Program

Rotarian Cindy Izotic, herself a MAPS volunteer, introduced the program’s speaker Reed Kimbill. Kimbill is a retired Army Colonel, and a retired school principal. He is currently the Director of Education for the MAPS Museum. In his introduction, he said as a boy he always wanted to fly, but had bad vision. Instead, he went into the Army and was inducted as a Second Lieutenant. “My job,” he explained, “Was shooting down airplanes.”

The museum has only two paid employees, but there are over 1,700 volunteers, many former military men and women. There are 50 airplanes on display and special events bring in visits of famous aircraft. Education is a central part of MAPS mission and they do hands-on experiences for younger visitors. Besides the planes, there are displays and memorabilia.

Kimbill began by telling stories of several planes including the very first glider build in Canton by a farmer named Martin. His farm was where Skyland Pines Golf course now sits and older residents will remember Martin Field, an airport that was located across the road from the golf course. It is now a sand and gravel quarry. In 1908, five years after the Wright Brothers, Martin built the first mono-wing plane. It did not have a motor, but flew as a glider. The plane did not have wheels, but had skis and was pulled by a horse to gain speed for take off. Later, Martin obtained a tractor to pull the plane. His wife Alma was the world’s first female pilot. Over time, the Wright Brothers, Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone came to Canton to meet with Martin. The museum has Martin’s original plane, patched up, restored and hanging in the main hanger.

There is a Sopwith Triplane. A local man bought the plans for the plane in England and built the one in the museum in his garage. He completed his plane when he was 78 years old and flew it.

There is the venerable C-47 SkyTrain, the primary cargo plane of WWII. The C-47s were designed in 1930 and there are still some flying today. There is a B-26 Marauder, one of only six left in the world. “It was designed and built for warfare,” Kimbill explained. The plan, in parts and pieces, were donated to the museum in 1984 and it took volunteers 24 years to restore it, although it is still not totally completed.

Then there is the OQ-2A Radio Plane — the world’s first drone. It was made of balsa wood and cloth and was used for gunnery practice in WWII. The story goes that Life Magazine sent a photographer to the factory in California where the plane was built. There was a cute woman working on the assembly line and the photographer took her picture. This was 1944. The woman, with a later name change, was Marilyn Monroe.

There is a F-86 Sabre Jet recovered from a swamp northeast of Akron. This plane won the national air race held in Cleveland in 1949. The F-100 Super Sabre is there along with an A-4 SkyHawk, an attack aircraft used in Vietnam. It later was flown as part of the Blue Angels team and the pilot was a Firestone High School graduate from Akron. There is a F-14 Tomcat and a F-16 Falcon. Various National Guard units are still using that model. One of Kimbill’s favorites is a restored B-24 Liberator.

The MAPS Museum is located at 2260 International Parkway west of the Akron-Canton Airport. It is open Tuesday through Sundays. Some planes are inside a hanger, and others are sitting on the tarmac. While there, visit the gift shop. There is an admission fee to the museum. “History is not made by airplanes,” as written in the MAPS brochure titled Aviation Up Close. “but by the men and women who designed, built and flew them.” Viewing the Gallery of Heroes while there is a must.

For those Rotarians who did not attend the meeting. I have been a Rotarian for 16 years and this was, possibly, one of the best programs we’ve ever had. Sorry you missed it.

Upcoming Events

March 21 (Tuesday) — Meet at Green Meadows during the 5 to 8 program. No meeting                          on Wednesday the 22nd.

March 29 — The LHS RYLA students will present a program.

The meeting adjourned a 1:10

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Reed Kimbill
 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 29, 2017

President Mark Sigler opened the meeting with a prayer and the members recited the Rotary 4-way Test and Pledged Allegiance to the flag. There were 16 members and six guests in attendance; the guests were students from Louisville High School. With respect for a funeral dinner in the Fellowship Hall, the club did not sing.

Happy Dollars

* Catherine Catlett thanked the club members for their support and attendance at the Green Meadows open house last week. She said the event was a big success with nearly 300 people attending.

* Bob Hallier brought the club members up to date with the library’s plans which may include — to be decided at an April 6 library board meeting — an election for a new library bond levy. A community grassroots organization has been formed to raise the $16,500 cost of a special election. Usually special elections are held in August.

* Al Gress thanked Denny Valentine and Bill Wood for their work in promoting Rotary at the Diversity Fair held at the high school two weeks ago. Denny worked making the signs and Bill rounded up the foreign exchange students to attend. Gress said the Rotary booth was the best one there.

The Business meeting

There was no business discussed during the meeting, but President Mark reminded the Board members of the monthly meeting Tuesday, April 4 at 8 a.m. Our April 5th meeting will be a business session.

The Program

Three LHS students who attended the Rotary-sponsored RYLA conference a couple of weeks ago spoke about their experiences. RYLA is a 3-day, 2-night program that teaches leadership skills for high school juniors. Dillon English, Michelle Damron and Hailie Murphy shared stories punctuated with laughter and enthusiasm. They all agreed it was a worthwhile experience and would return if the chance were available. Some of the highlights included: going without their cell phones, pads or computers for the weekend. All agreed that going into a new situation where they did not know anyone else in the 100 or so participants was daunting for them — at first. They were broken into groups and given a personality test, which they said was fairly accurate in defining their personalities. Hailie said that although she was a shy person, she learned to speak up. The best thing they brought home was the understanding that different people from different backgrounds can work together. There were no clocks in the rooms and they were kept engaged all the time. The comment was made that “there was no one there to judge you . . . it was a very cool experience!

Luke Shepherd, an LHS senior, spoke about his plans for next year as an exchange student to Belgium. For expenses, he is selling photos he took that will be on display in Uptown Joe’s. He also sold his car to help with expenses. He will leave in August for a year abroad.

The two foreign exchange students currently attending the high school, Ana Belem Munoz from Mexico, and Theo Crusson from France, spoke briefly about their end of the year preparations.

Upcoming Events

April 5 — Business meeting

The meeting adjourned a 1:00

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary