Louisville Rotary Meetings 2016     
4th Quarter
PAGE DOWN - to get to the NEWER minutes!

Louisville Rotary Club

Oct. 5, 2016 Meeting minutes

Eighteen Rotarians met for lunch and a business meeting in the Fellowship Hall of Paradise United Church of Christ. The song of the day was Happy Birthday for Mike Snyder and Jason Bydos. The following items were discussed. Some of the subjects had a resolution and some were informational.

Items included:

Denny Valentine — the Oct. 12 program will be a presentation by Judge DeWine.

Betty Derry — Next Historical Society meeting is Tuesday, Oct. 11 in the Ahh Gallery. A reenactment of the life of Victoria Woodhull will be presented. Woodhull was the first woman to run for president (of the United States). Betty also informed everyone of the photography contest currently going on with 82 entries on display

Betty Derry — Mark calendars for December 7th program at Paradise Church commemorating the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Tom McAlister will be the speaker.

Mike Snyder — Bring wrapped candy to donate for the YMCA Halloween party planned for Oct. 22.

Mike Snyder — Plan to help decorate the old Post Office for Christmas & the Ahh Gallery. Saturday, Nov. 19 beginning at 9 in the morning.

Jim Edwards — Reminded Rotarians to attend the YMCA Snowflake Auction set for Dec. 3 at the Greek Orthodox Church next to Malone University. Discussion was held for a Rotary table for the evening.

Bill Wood — Discussed the need for winter host families for both foreign exchange students. One is needed by Thanksgiving.

Cynthia Kerchner — Thanked the club for supporting the Farmers Market program and said next year the market would be the second Saturday of each month beginning June 10.

Bob Hallier — Said the Warm Coats program is set thanks due to monetary donations from H-P Products and The Eagles Club. Last year, the club provided 159 coats accompanied with mittens/gloves and hats. The project should be completed by Oct. 11. Bob also presented a financial report.

Ken Smith — There is a flag assembly session set for Friday, Oct. 7 at the Edwards Barn.

Jim Edwards — We have an extra $4,000 unbudgeted. What to do with the funds? Allen Gress suggested we establish an emergency fund for local and world disasters. No action was taken.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Oct. 12, 2016 Meeting minutes

Twenty-three Rotarians met for lunch and a meeting in the Fellowship Hall of Paradise United Church of Christ October 12 with President Mark Sigler at the helm. The song of the day was a four-round singing of Row, Row, Rotary.

After the program, there was one item of business. The Hurricane Matthew’s swath through Haiti was briefly discussed and a motion was made to send a $1,000 Shelter Box through the Rotary International Haiti Relief Drive. The motion passed unaminously.

Happy Dollars

* Bob Hallier is thankful the township blacktopped Nickel Plate. He said he has lived in his home over 30 years and this is the first time it has ever been blacktopped.

* Ken Willett said he, his brother and sister visited Cedarville University recently.

* Betty Derry reminded the Rotarians of the Oct 20 and the 25th guided and informative walk through Union Cemetery. This is the Historical Society’s first such event and it begins at 6 in the evening. Bring your own flashlight and learn some facts about our local cemetery.

* Bob Cameron reminded everyone about the annual reverse raffle for St. Joseph’s Senior Living Center. The dinner raffle will be held at Skyland Pines, Nov. 12. For more information about tickets, call 330-875-5562.

* Mike Snyder thanked everyone for the candy for the library and the YMCA’s Halloween parties. “We could still use some next week,” he added.

The Program

The program was a talk by The Honorable Judge Pat DeWine, who is currently an appellate judge for the Ohio First District Court of Appeals that sits in Hamilton County. He is also running for election to the Ohio Supreme Court in the November election.

Judge DeWine discussed the appellate process in the Ohio court system after wondering how many people really understand it? The judge’s talk was a civics lesson. “We need to educate the people as to what we do,” he said. “Nearly every aspect of our lives is touched by judges and the judicial process.”

Ohio citizens elect their judges whereas many other states use an appointment process. There are 12 three-judge appellate districts in Ohio. Stark County is in the 5th District. The final resort for persons in the legal system dealing with state statutes is the Ohio Supreme Court. It should be remembered that the appellate courts only deal with questions of law; they do not have a jury and rarely override a jury’s decision.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary



Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

October 19, 2016

Next year’s President Jennifer Anderson took the podium for Mark Sigler who was out of town. Liz Hand gave the prayer, the Pledge was recited, as was the Rotary 4-Way Test. There were 19 members present with no guests.

Happy Dollars

* Bob Hallier announced there were 111 requests for warm coats, less than last year.

* Betty Derry reminded the Rotarians of the Oct 20 and the 25th guided and informative walk through Union Cemetery. This is the Historical Society’s first such event and it begins at 6 in the evening. Bring your own flashlight and learn some facts about our local cemetery. Also, a reminder of the Downtown Festival Saturday and a new exhibit coming to The Ahh Gallery.

* Greg Anderson announced the Walking Path clean up this Saturday, 9 a.m. starting at Greg’s house.

* Tickets for the Pancake Breakfast are available. Ken Smith has already sold 28.

* Mike Snyder thanked everyone for the candy for the library and the YMCA’s Halloween parties.

The Program

Denny Valentine introduced Melissa Loomis, the day’s guest speaker. Denny knows Melissa from meetings he attends at the Regency Care Center in Canton. Melissa works as a waitress in the Regency cafeteria and others say that she works harder, faster and is more efficient than other waitresses who might have three arms. The significance of the comparison is that Melissa has only one complete arm and the other is a stump.

The story

The missing arm story began early last summer when a raccoon and her dogs were fighting. She went to the dogs rescue and the raccoon bit her on the lower arm. Off to the hospital, then to stat care — back and forth for three weeks. The wound did not heal. After 29 days in the hospital with a temperature of 103, the orthopedic specialist Dr. Ajay Seth was called in on her case. Surgery, he said, was needed and maybe it would take an hour and a half. Turned out she was on the operating table for 16 hours. Dr. Seth said it was the worse case of septic infection he had ever seen. The result was an amputation of her lower arm; otherwise her condition could have been fatal. But Dr. Seth was not finished. He did further surgery to connect nerves in her arm so she could feel, surgery that had never been attempted in the United States. The result is now Mellissa does have feeling, but her first prosthetic arm has not worked yet and a second one is being made for her. “I have feeling like I had a hand; I still reach out to grip things,” she said. “I also have phantom pain for the hand I don’t have.”

The surgery has given Melissa a great deal of publicity that resulted in a major story in the Canton Repository and she has been written about in People Magazine. She also has been to the Cleveland Clinic, Johns Hopkins and other hospitals for study.

The hardest adaption? “Just doing the everyday necessities like brushing my hair”, she replied.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
Melissa Loomis

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

October 26, 2016

After a week’s respite, Mark Sigler was back at the helm leading the Wednesday Rotary meeting held at Paradise United Church of Christ. There were 19 members present with no guests. The usual Pledge of Allegiance was given along with a prayer by Rev. Locke. The Rotary 4-Way test was recited. Mark, in his favorite role as songmiester, presented for the group’s inspiration his well-used high school baseball bat and glove, all in the spirit of the day’s song — Take Me Out to the Ballgame in honor of the baseball World’s Series. Mark also reminded members of the untimely passing of the 50s rock star Bobby Vie. Younger members looked on with the questioned expression — Who the heck is Bobby Vie?

Happy Dollars

* Bob Hallier reminded Rotarians that the Louisville club was founded in 1925, 91 years ago.

* Greg Anderson thanked the eight persons who show up Saturday for the Walking Trail clean up.

* Tickets for the Pancake Breakfast are available.

The Program

Denny Valentine introduced Stephanie Werren the day’s guest speaker. Stephanie lives in North Canton and is a member of the North Canton Rotary Club. She is also the director of the Leadership Stark County Program, which was her topic for the club. Stephanie is also a councilperson for North Canton.

The Leadership Program has been turning out a corps of leaders for 30 years. Stephanie has been with the program for 12 years, director for the last three. “We train people to be better leaders,” she explained. “There is not one non-profit organization that can say they are the same as they were 10 years ago.” Ms. Werren said they have four programs ranging from programs for experienced and emerging leaders, one for young professionals ages 24-34, a program for those new to Stark County and custom training for individuals or small groups of employees. The program has turned out over 1,000 graduates.

“We try to get through all Stark communities,” she said. “We teach that innovation and technology requires us to think differently, but it’s all about serving the community.”

The 6-week course is $424 and meets two hours every other week. Applications are taken in July and December.

Warren gave the group a quick test of their knowledge of Stark County and the City of Louisville. The test begins with a premise of If Stark County were a village of 100 people, how many . . . . (The test is based on a Stark County population of 375,400 from the 2010 census and 2013 estimates. Ohio has a population or 11,600,000 and the U.S. has a population of 315 million).

So, here we go. If Stark County were a village of 100 people, how many . . .

                                      Stark              U.S.

Would be Caucasian                    89%           63%

Would be African-American                  8%            13%

Would be Hispanic/Latino                   2%            17%

Would be Asian                        1%            5%

Would be under age 18                      22%           23%

Would be over age 65                       17%           14%

Would be high school graduates & over age 25    89%                86%

Would be college graduates & over age 25        21%           29%

Would speak a language other than English at home

                                      4%            21% 

Would own homes                            70%           66%

Would be foreign-born                      2%            13%

Would be living in poverty                 15%           15%

Would be unemployed in July of 2014             5.7%          6.2%

In Stark County, one of every 5.5 persons receive Medicare or Medicaid

 

Food for thought.

Submitted by Allen Gress, Secretary


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

November 2, 2016

President Mark Sigler called the meeting to order with 18 members and one guest present. President Sigler led the club members in prayer and asked for blessings for all those assembled and called for a healing in the community and a timely settlement to the current school impasse. All said “Amen.” Club members pledged allegiance to the flag and recited the Rotary Four Way Test. Members welcomed guest Terry Lingenhoel, the brother of Arden Lingenhoel. Terry has lived in Hungary for a number of years and brought greetings from former Rotary Exchange Student, Kriztian Toth!

Club Secretary Allen Gress is attending a funeral this day and Mike Snyder graciously took notes. (Mike, I owe you one!)

Business notes

* Pancake Day coordinator Mike Snyder distributed a sign-up sheet for the event and thanked Cat Catlett for securing corporate sponsorship of Green Meadows Health & Wellness Center for the breakfast. Denny Valentine will handle the poster from Green Meadows that will be displayed on the Pancake Day. Mike asked for a volunteer to assist in delivering the pancakes to Biery Cheese because David Yeagley will be out of town on family business. Snyder thanked Scooter Israel for securing sponsors for the placemats. Despite the teachers’ strike, the LHS Band Boosters are expecting a record number of vendors for the craft show and everything should be good to go November 12 for our pancake breakfast.

* Flag Czar Ken Smith called for volunteers to report to the Edwards Barn on Monday, November 7 to assist with some flag maintenance duties.

* Jim Edwards stated that he and Ken are conversing with Steve Metzger regarding the possibility of converting to cloth flags. More about this matter in the coming weeks.

* Bill Wood reported a host family is needed for Theo, our exchange student from France. He is allergic to both cats and dogs and is an extremely nice young man! $120.00 is available for each of the two exchange students for various smaller costs.

* Cat Catlett asked about the level of support for this year’s RYLA program, specifically, how many students will be able to attend the annual conference in Pittsburgh. We have $1,400 set aside to send four students to Pittsburgh, with about $525.00 coming from the Rotary Foundation.

* Bob Hallier reported that 150 coats for 114 pre-registered kids have been ordered at a cost is $2,700.00. We are thankful for a generous donation of $500.00 from H-P Products. The Eagles Club has pledged an amount of money, but it has not yet been received.

* Treasurer Bob Hallier will be submitting IRS form number 990 by November 15. Treasurer Hallier gave a thorough financial report of the club’s finances as of October. A brief summary of follows:

$24,818.48    Consumers National Bank Account Balance

$22,000.00    KeyBank Account Balance

$46,818.48    Total 

INCOME (major line items as of October 31)

$2,377.00 Membership Dues. Budgeted is $5,500.00. Two members have yet to pay!

$1,010.00 Flag Project funds collected. Budgeted is $28,000.00.

$5,977.00 Taste of Louisville revenues.  Budgeted is $5,000.00.

$13,817.50    Total Income. Budgeted is $41,300.00.

EXPENDITURES (major line items as of October 31)

$2,204.00 Dues to Rotary International. Budgeted is $5,500.00.

$211.15 Community/Economic Development Committee (Cynthia Kerchner). Budgeted is $500.00.

$2,027.00 Constitution Festival & Queen. Budgeted for $2,120.00.

$1,000.00 Rotary Projects. Budgeted is $1,500.00.

$740.00   Foreign Exchange (Inbound). Budgeted is $3,500.00.

$233.16   Flag Project. Budgeted for is $3,000.00.

$1,725.84 Taste of Louisville. Budgeted is $2,500.00.

$9,887.96 Total Expenses. Budgeted is $39,405.00.

NET INCOME as of October 31, 2016 is $3,929.54. Budgeted is $1,895.00.

In addition, $3,000.00 has been promised from the Canton Rotary Club to assist with our current Rotary Exchange Students.

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

November 9, 2016

President Mark Sigler called the meeting to order with 21 members and three guests present. Rev. Ken Locker led the club members in prayer giving a special blessing for our newly elected president Donald Trump. He also called for healing in the community and a timely settlement to the current schoolteachers’ strike. Club members pledged allegiance to the flag and recited the Rotary Four Way Test. Members welcomed guest Stark County Auditor Alan Harold (a LHS graduate) and two members of the ATF Cleveland Office.

Happy Dollars

* Mark gave congratulations to Greg Anderson for his work organizing the walking trail clean up and Saturday’s Pancake Breakfast.

* Pancake Day coordinator Mike Snyder distributed a sign-up sheet for the event and said everything should be good to go November 12 for our pancake breakfast.

* Somebody (I don’t catch who it was) complimented Bob Hallier on his 4-page financial report he passed out at the last meeting.

* Bill Wood reported a host family is needed for Theo, our exchange student from France. He is allergic to both cats and dogs and is an extremely nice young man!

* Bob Hallier reported that 150 coats for 114 pre-registered kids are being delivered today (Wednesday) and they will be distributed next week. Committee members are to meet at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 15 in the library and distribution will be from 3 to 4 in the afternoon.

* Mark Sigler reminded everyone that the flag retirement was next week.

* Alan Harold thanked those who participated in Tuesday’s election.

* 80 participants in the special events day held at Green Meadows raised over $1,000, Cat Catallet said.

* Cyntihia Kerchner suggested we all bring canned or bagged food next week so we could send a food basket to the Community Cupboard. All agreed to do so.

The Program

Bill Hall, the Cleveland Area ATF Director (Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms) of the northeast Ohio region spoke about the duties of his agency. Suzanne Dabkowski, the Public Affairs Officer for the district, accompanied him. There are satellite ATF offices in Columbus, Youngstown and Toledo. Hall, a Rutgers University graduate, began his law enforcement career as an Army MP, then was discharged in 1993 and went to work as an immigration agent for the federal government. He moved to the ATF in 1999, and come to Cleveland from the Philadelphia office. The ATF has been a government agency for 200 years, first under the direction of the Treasury Department, now under Homeland Security. There are 25 field offices around the country and the world. There are ATF offices in Canada, Mexico, Columbia, and with Interpol in France. In Cleveland, there are seven agents dealing mostly with crimes that are committed with firearms. These days, almost none of there work is with tobacco issues.

Cleveland ATF works with the Stark County Crime Lab and has helped them solve four criminal cases in the last six months.

The ATF works with a budget of $1.2 billion and has a national staff of 5,158. Last year, the agency issued 139,000 firearms licenses. Would you believe, in 2013 there were 10.8 million guns manufactured in the United States? The agency did 30,877 investigations resulting in 5,503 cases referred for the prosecution of 12,378 defendants. Of those, 8,847 were indicted and 4,031 were convicted. Of those convictions, 78 were given life sentences and there were five death sentences. Over 88% of these cases involved firearm-related crimes. ATF also completed 978 cases dealing with explosives.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:05.

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary
Bill Hall and Suzanne Dabkowski


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

November 16, 2016

President Mark Sigler called the meeting to order with 21 members present. Mark led the club members in prayer calling for healing in the community. Club members pledged allegiance to the flag, recited the Rotary Four Way Test and sang You’re a Grand Old Flag.

Happy Dollars

* Eva Roshong joyfully announced that she is now a grandmother. Members offered their congratulations.

* Mark thanked Greg Anderson and Mike Snyder for coordinating the Pancake Breakfast. The profit figure was not available but will be for the next meeting. Bill Wood, who worked the assembly line, said the last sausage available was given to the last customer at about 11:20.

* Bob Hallier reported that 116 coats were being delivered last Thursday. There were a few coats left that will be donated to local charities.

* Mark Sigler reminded everyone that the flag retirement was next week and stadium flags come down Saturday.

* Betty Derry announced a special program to be held at the church celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack. Also, the Derrys are putting up Christmas lights at the old Post Office on Friday and need some help. Be there a little after 9 in the morning.

* There will be no meeting next week — November 23 — due to the Thanksgiving period.

* Secretary Gress reported that last week’s club minutes were absconded by the feds due to the title Pistlal Packing Rotary Minutes, but were eventually sent. Gress speculates that someone in Home Land Security keyed on the title and wonders if his name is now on a “watch” list.

The Program

F.B.I. Special Agent Michael S. Sirohman, from the Canton Office, was the guest speaker. Mike, by the way, lives in Louisville and has children in the Louisville Schools. Agent Sirohman is from Youngstown and holds a degree from Youngstown State University. He originally wanted to be a teacher, but switched majors and became a CPA accountant. He worked in an accounting office in Warren. He did his F.B.I. training at Quantico in 2001, completed the training and was assigned to the Albany, New York office. He transferred to northeast Ohio in 2010.

There are 56 field offices for the F.B.I. with one in Cleveland. Cleveland’s district is broken down to satellite offices in Canton, Akron, Toledo and Mansfield. There are also 50-plus offices in countries around the world.

Mike said the F.B.I. works with local law enforcement officers. “We do many cyber crime investigations,” he said. “We do a lot with child pornography.” Mike said he deals mostly with white-collar crimes. He spoke about fraud schemes that seem to be growing. He gave the example of the Nigerian Fraud and said that many frauds originate in Africa. “The fraud list is endless,” he quipped. “Craig’s List, the damsel in distress, and the Grandma, I need cash tricks abound.” The only way to combat these frauds is by educating the people. Never send money by a phone request, he said. On-line romance scams are especially painful. Perpetrators get their start by hacking into peoples’ emails. Mike also cautioned about phony large companies billing small companies for items never ordered or delivered. As time ran out, Agent Mike said, “Do not use a debt card, shred & burn receipts and bills, and limit check writing.

The meeting was adjourned at 1:03.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary