Louisville Rotary Meetings 2016     
1st Quarter
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January 6, 2016 minutes
Sorry for the delay in last week's minutes but we learned about the smart, funny and talented Catherine Catlett. Cat was born in the country and was always been an energetic, (self-diagnosed) over-achiever. She met her husband, Aaron, in college at the University of Cincinnati. In 2007 she and Aaron bought a house over 100 years old and did a complete remodel; taking it's value from $0 to $275,000! They currently have a 5 year old, Emma, and 2 year old, Colton. Athletic training is her passion and loves gross, gorey injuries! She enjoys working with seniors as she does know because as a child she slept in the same bed as her grandmother. We love Cat and are happy that she has found such happiness in her life!

submitted by Maranda Saling

Catherine Catlett:
January 13, 2016 minutes

We were lucky enough this week to have our two exchange students tell us a little more about themselves. Gregoire Sprumont is from Belgium and Sophie Morel is from Brazil. Sophie is from Tandil, Buenos Aires. She lives with her mom, dad and brother and misses her dog very much. Her friends threw her a surprise farewell party and loved it. Greg shared that in the North of Belgium they speak Dutch; South, French and there's a small part that speaks German. Sailing is a popular sport in Belgium and Greg enjoys it. Belgium is known for beer, waffles and chocolate but he misses their French fries more than anything else! We're so thankful to have these wonderful teens share their experiences with us!
submitted by Maranda Saling

Sophia and her guest Reis Rankin

Gregiore and his guest Abigail Beaver


Gregoire Sprumonte and Sophie Morel


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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 20, 2016

President Mike Snyder presided AND presented the program for 17 members and one guest at the Wednesday meeting for lunch at Paradise UCC Church. The guest in attendance was Sarah Sonego who expressed an interest in joining. Members dined with meat loaf, mashed potatoes and mixed vegetables.

The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance, a prayer given by David Yeagley and a recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test. Club Songmeister Mark Sigler lead the group in singing two songs; a happy birthday in honor of David Yeagley’s Big 50, and For She’s a Jolly Good Fellow in honor of Maranda Saling. This is Maranda’s last meeting as she is moving to Phoenix, Arizona. Her infectious personality will be missed.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Maranda chipped in a buck to wish David a happy birthday and to reminded members that she would be around!

     * In his best Kentucky humor, Prez Snyder quipped that OSHA was called regarding the excessive heat and flames from 50 candles during the surprise birthday party held for David Yeagley last night at Kate’s Place.

The Program

Mike reminded everyone that not only is he a member of Rotary; he is also a member of the Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society. “And I love history,” he said, pointing out his blue shirt he purchased on a trip in France to visit the Normandy Beach. Mike walks the streets as his form of exercise and as he walked, he noticed the veteran’s memorials at the corner of Mill & E. Gorgas needed spruced up. Actually, the WWII memorial needs serious work. The landscape around the memorials needs attention and the sidewalks are in disrepair.

This is to be a project sponsored by the Historical Society with donated money held by the Constitution Committee since they have the 501c3 IRS certificate that allows all donations to be tax deductable.

There are three components to the Veteran’s Memorial complex. The Doughboy statue, the WWII/Korean War Memorial and the Vietnam Memorial, which was dedicated in 1985. There are 46 military personnel listed who died in action including 33 in WWII, 3 in Korea, 10 in Vietnam and one has died in Afghanistan.

Mike has been given permission from the City Council to coordinate this project with a projected deadline for Dec. 7, which will be the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the beginning of WWII. Snyder is in the process of finding professionals with the technical expertise for such renovation projects so a cost estimate can be formulated. With the cost estimate in hand, the fund raising can begin in earnest. Individual donors will be asked to give $25 to honor a veteran with those donor names listed on the Historical Society’s website. The Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club and the Historical Society have already agreed to participate in the project.

Mike closed his presentation with a recorded song by the County & Western Group The Statler Brothers who sang ‘He’s More Than a Name on the Wall.

Rotarian Bob Hallier said the club should have a part in the Dec. 7 event. “This will be a big deal,” he said. Everyone agreed.

Calendar of Events

Jan. 27 program — Howard Metee, a Boardman Rotarian who will give his perspective on the Russia/Ukraine situation.

Feb. 3 — A business meeting.

Feb. 27 — Mid-year assembly at the Foltz Center in East Canton.

April 29-30 — Rotary District 6650 annual conference in Bolivar.

June 22 — The annual banquet at Skyland Pines.

 

The meeting adjourned at 12:55.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 27, 2016

President Mike Snyder presided with 16 members and one guest at the Wednesday meeting for lunch at Paradise UCC Church. The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance, a prayer given by Liz Hand and a group recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test Club. Songmeister Mark Sigler, a renowned Beetle aficionado, led the group in singing two rounds of All Together Now. It needs to be noted in the minutes to be filed away for all posterity that Mark’s song leading, his booming baritone voice and theatrics may get him on America’s Got Talent, but the blended voices of the membership were a weak accompaniment. Mark thinks the members just need a little more practice.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Jim Edwards told of how his home heating gas bill went from $220 last January to just $80 this year.

     * Prez Snyder urged members to attend the Community Players performances for four Friday night February performances to be presented at Skyland Pines. Brother Rotarian Don Marshall returns to the local stage in a lead role for this captivating murder mystery.

     * In his introduction of the speaker, Snyder showed a remarkable knowledge of chemistry when he asked the question — What is the second most prevalent element in the Earth’s atmosphere? The answer is embedded somewhere in these minutes.

The Program

Howard Metee, a retired Chemistry Professor from Youngstown State University, and a 26-year Rotarian spoke on the subject of American-Russian-Ukraine relations. Learning to speak fluent Russian, Metee spent 1997-98 living in St. Petersburg, Russia as a Fulbright Scholar and has since established many contacts with the Russians. He has spent two months in Russia establishing joint ventures for Rotary International, which has given him a unique perspectives on the political struggles in the country and with the country of Ukraine.

Metee began his message with geography and history lessons of both the Ukraine and Crimea. The Ukraine is the 46th largest country in the world, and has a warm water seaport coveted by Russia. The Ukraine has been a part of Russian rule since 1787 and the rein of Catherine the Great until the fall of the Berlin Wall followed by the economic and political turmoil in Russia during the 1990s. During that period, Ukraine declared its independence. Russia fears that Ukraine will join NATO and the US will position missiles there. Metee reminds us of how America responded with the Cuban Missile Crises in the early 1960s or how Texas was annexed from Mexico in 1844.

When Valdimar Putin took control of the Russian government one of his goals was to reestablish the previous Russian territory. Russia attempted to annex Ukraine in 2014 and there has been conflict ever since. The United States has protested the Russia advances and there is the possibility of armed conflict between NATO forces and Communist Russia. Russia has a military force on the border.

Metee said that most Americans don’t understand the geographical and cultural history of Russia and the Ukraine. Without making a definite pitch for America to stay out of the conflict, that was the general theme of his message. Metee strongly believes that there can be world peace through understanding.

Calendar of Events

Feb. 3 — Business meeting with limited helium use.

Feb. 10 — David Horning motivational speaker.

Feb. 17 — Amy Simpkins and the YMCA Fitness Program.

Feb. 27 — Mid-year assembly at the Foltz Center in East Canton.

April 29-30 — Rotary District 6650 annual conference in Bolivar.

June 22 — The annual banquet at Skyland Pines.

e meeting adjourned at 1:55.

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary
Howard Metee speaker

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 3, 2016

President Mike Snyder presided with just 13 members and four guests at the Wednesday meeting for lunch with chesseburgers & potato chunks. The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance, a prayer given by Eva Roshong and a group recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test Club. Songmeister Mark Sigler was noticeably absent from the meeting. The guests included Brian Strubhar from Poland (Ohio, not the country) and three women from the YMCA accompanying Jennifer Anderson, today’s speaker.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Bill Wood announced a forthcoming trip to Costa Rica

     * Bob Hallier gave a pitch for the upcoming library levy with his library message of the day. Last year the Louisville served over 17,600 visits. That raises the question, how do they know; who counts? Give us the answer next week, Bob.

     * Mike Snyder chipped in with the information that the library is now open on Sunday afternoons 1 to 5 and he was the first person to take advantage of the new hours.

     * Cindy Petitti informed the members that Maranda went job hunting, had four interviews and was offered all four jobs. Cindy was not sure which job she accepted, but did know she was working Wednesday.

A short Business session

1. Yours truly was officially elected to finish the year as the club secretary now that Maranda is off to the West Coast looking to make her fortune.

2. Thane Bolden has resigned as president-elect and Bob Hallier has been selected to serve in that office. President Snyder requested volunteers for the position of vice-president and for members to think about offering their names for next year which begins July 1.

3. There were 30-second reports from several of the committees and Jim Edwards representing the Flag Committee reported that we have 121 paid customers to date and he plans to send emails out March 25. It takes Jim 14 hours to send all of last year’s customers their new invoice. Ken Smith reminded members that we always need volunteers to deliver and post flags, and keep an ear open for prospective flag deliverers.

4. The Maternal Health Committee chaired by Liz Hand said their committee’s $300 went to purchase a Safe Sleep Tool Kit with passouts for prospective mothers.

5. Eva is looking into the Health Check-up program sponsored by the Dennison Rotary Club. More information on that later.

 

The Program

Mike Snyder turned the podium over to the day’s speaker and said “Today we will meet the “real” Jennifer Anderson.” Jennifer is the nearly new director of the Louisville YMCA. Jennifer, who grew up in Hooverville, asked us not to hold that against her. She said her hometown is, indeed, special, but she has found that Louisville is special, too. “It’s home,” she reiterated. Her Grandfather once owned Myers Chevrolet in North Canton and while growing up she was always a “Y rat”. Besides being a gymnast, she has taught gymnastics and has been involved with the program most of her life. Now her youngest son is taking gymnastics. An Ohio University graduate, she worked summers while in college as a camp counselor at Camp Wakonda on the shores of beautiful Leesville Lake. She is still a member of their Board of Directors. The camp is special in her life as that is where she met her husband, who is a professional artist. They have three children, the oldest is a freshman at McKinley High School, the middle child is in 7th grade and the youngest is 7 years old and attends the Arts Academy.

Jennifer was a pre-school Director in Maryland, and has traveled and spent two weeks in Northern Ireland. She and her husband lived in Detroit, Michigan for three years while he was a designer for General Motors. From there they moved to Florida for six years and then relocated back to Ohio. “Family was here,” she said.

For fun, their family goes to church Sunday mornings then ride bicycles or go to gymnastic meets. They all enjoy riding bikes as a fun family activity.

One of her goals here is to hold a national gymnastic event in Louisville. She had words of appreciation for her first Snowflake Auction and announced that next year the auction will be moved to the Greek Orthodox Church Event Center located just east of the Malone College campus.

Calendar of Events

Feb. 10 — David Horning motivational speaker.

Feb. 17 — Amy Simpkins and the YMCA Fitness Program.

Feb. 27 — Mid-year assembly at the Foltz Center in East Canton.

April 29-30 — Rotary District 6650 annual conference in Bolivar.

June 22 — The annual banquet at Skyland Pines.

 

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 sharp.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary
Jennifer Anderson of the Louisville YMCA

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 10, 2016

President Mike Snyder, in his usual good cheer, presided with 23 members at the Wednesday luncheon meeting where members shared a ravioli and salad meal. The pasta was lo-cal. The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance, a prayer given by Liz Hand and a group recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test. Club Songmeister Mark Sigler, fresh back for attending a Barry Manilow concert in Orlando, delivered another memorable song — Rocky Top, which according to Sigler, is a fight song for the University of Tennessee. Before the group attempted the lyrics, Mark told the story of how the Denver Quarterback Peyton Manning loved that song. Manning is a UT alum. The day’s songfest number could be considered a “show tune” with the members providing a tune of sorts and Mark the show.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Yours truly pitched a dollar in the pot to share the fact he was cleaning his basement and was reviewing a pile of Heralds dating from 2003. Among those papers were four stories about current Rotarians, so I cut them and brought them for all to read. The lucky four to find their way into print were Ken Smith, Jim Edwards, Greg Anderson and Greg  Parrish. It was noted that Parrish, himself a former athlete, coached athletics, administered athletics and also was a writer for the Herald — about what? Athletics, of course.

     * Bob Hallier gave another pitch for the upcoming library levy with his library question of the day. How many Louisville library program participants were there in 2015? And the answer is (drum roll) 17,600 which nobody got right, not even close. Next week’s question might be — How many of those participates could fit on the children’s small chairs?

                        The Program

David Horning, billed as a motivation speaker, comedian and writer, riveted the group with a 25-minute talk with power point help, about the way to find peace though changing your perspective. By playing three characters, each with a humorous story yet carrying a salient message about perspective. Horning stressed how a person first looks at a subject through a programmed anticipation colors the person’s viewpoint. People should always find funny or delight in an object and at that point the object changes, and a person’s feelings are more positive. “When you change the way you look at things, those things change. Try it,” he preaches, “and that can turn conflict into opportunity.”

One of his skits was Having Fun at Funerals, a parody of the traditional American funeral. Horning tells the audience to avoid labels . . . “It’s not good or bad,” he stresses, “it just is. Question everything . . . challenge your programmed perspectives.” He suggests repetition to repeat the empowering language.

Another skit was Running for Pope and becoming a Pope for the people.

A wrap up — When you change the way you look at things, you change the thing.

Calendar of Events

Feb. 17 — Amy Simpkins and the YMCA Fitness Program.

Feb. 19-21 — RYLA conference.

Feb. 24 — Robb Hankins for ArtsinStark.

Feb. 27 — Mid-year assembly at the Foltz Center in East Canton.

April 29-30 — Rotary District 6650 annual conferences in Bolivar.

June 22 — The annual banquet at Skyland Pines.

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 sharp.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
David Horning


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 17, 2016

President Mike Snyder took time off for a week’s vacation, so President-Elect Mark Sigler rang the Rotary bell signaling the meeting was in session. Eighteen members and one guest at the Wednesday luncheon meeting shared a vegetable soup and cheese sandwich meal. The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance, a prayer given by Sigler and a group recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test. In honor of the day’s program to be presented by Louisville YMCA fitness person Amy Simkins, Sigler led the group in singing the wedding reception favorite YMCA complete with arm motions. Dave Charles was the welcomed guest.

“Young man, there’s no need to feel down

I said young man, pick yourself off the ground

dum, dum, dum . . . Y-M-C-A, Y-M-C-A . . . “

 

The Day’s Happy Dollars

     * Yours truly expended a dollar to share — for the second week in a row — the fact he was cleaning his basement and was reviewing a pile of Heralds dating from 2005 through 2007. Among those papers were several stories about current Rotarians, so I cut them and brought them for all to read. The lucky ones so honored included Ken Smith, Jim Edwards, Mark Sigler and Mike Snyder.

     * Bob Hallier gave his weekly pitch for the upcoming library levy with his library fact of the day. “What will happen to the old library building if a new library is built?” And the answer is — The school board owns both the property and the building and will assume use of the facility. There has been discussion that the board would move its administrative offices there and sell the downtown building called the Zwick Building. Hallier concluded his message — getting two messages for his dollar bill — and asked how many Rotarians were going to vote for the levy prompting an enthusiastic unanimous YES response.

 

                        The Program

Mark introduced Amy Simpkins, the Louisville Y Fitness & gymnastics coach for the past 16 years. Among her duties, she coordinates all gymnastics programs, teaches yoga classes, manages the Silver Sneakers program and coordinates personal trainers. Before coming to work at the Y, Amy said she was a stay-at-home mom for her two children. “I signed up for a step aerobics class,” she recalled, “and the instructor complimented me and asked me to teach the class. I did and I am still teaching it.” No problem with her children as they now feel the Y is their second home. Amy’s husband works out at the Y, too. “We have become more healthy because of that,” she admits.

The Y, she emphasizes, is a family-oriented facility and points out that on Jan. 22 the Y hosted a family night and over 400 persons attended including members and non-members. “We have a large base of seniors,” she said.

There are many competitive teams, too, including swimming and gymnastics. There are about 60 kids on the swimming teams. And the LHS swim team practices in the Y pool.

“Young man, there’s a place to go

I said young man, when you’re short on your dough . . .

Dum, dum, dum . . . Y-M-C-A, Y-M-C-A . . .”

 

Among other Y activities there is pickleball — you have to see it to understand it, there’s an exercise program using weighted drumsticks and the Y began a Zumba class eight years ago.

“We are the center of the community for after-school activities,” Simpins said. “We’re making an impact . . . those kids have a safe place to hang . . . there’s good energy at the Y after school.”

During a Q&A period, it was asked what the long-range plans are for the Y. “We always run out of space; we always need more shared space,” was the answer. “There has not been a capital campaign for eight years. Upgrading the women’s locker room is a current project.

“It’s fun to stay at the

Y-M-C-A”

 

Calendar of Events

Feb. 24 — Robb Hankins for ArtsinStark.

Feb. 27 — Mid-year assembly at the Foltz Center in East Canton.

April 29-30 — Rotary District 6650 annual conferences in Bolivar.

June 22 — The annual banquet at Skyland Pines.

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 sharp.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
Amy Simpkins

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 25, 2016

Rotary President Mike Snyder presided.

Meeting for lunch at Paradise UCC Church, 15 Rotarians in attendance along with two guests shared good food and camaraderie. The membership recited the Pledge of Allegiance and a recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test. Liz Hand aptly provided the invocation. Songmeister Mark Sigler, in his ever on-going attempt to bring culture and sophistication to the club, led the group in singing Starry, Starry Night while we all looked in pain at an oil painting of Vincent Van Gogh completed before he lost his ear.

Starry, starry night, paint your palette blue and gray,

Look out on a summer’s day, with eyes that know the darkness in my soul . . .

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Betty Derry gave announcements regarding the upcoming Lsv.-Nim. Historical Society dinner/meeting at the Nimishillen Township Fire Station #2 for a program recounting of the history of the NTFD presented by Chief Rich Peterson. She also reported a new exhibit was in progress for the Ahh Gallery with students from the middle school displaying some of their home grown art. And, don’t forget the Historical Society’s annual fundraiser dinner held at the Brookside Farm May 10. It’s only $30 per person.

     * Bill Wood announced he was back from his cruise to Costa Rica, but misses the temperatures there, which averaged 90 degrees each day.

     * Bob Hallier gave a pitch for the library bond issue and promised campaign signs for all who wanted one. When leaving he had none left.

Program

Robb Hankins and Ryan Humbert, representing ArtsinStark, brought the members to date with their 20/20 Vision Project over the past year and a half in downtown Louisville. ArtsinStark, now in their 8th year of existence, has projects going on developing the Downtown Canton Arts District, also projects in Alliance, Minerva and  Louisville. In the beginning, he paired up with Ron & Betty Derry who were promoting and developing the Louisville-Nimishillen Township History Society, and both decided that opening a downtown storefront art gallery would be a good idea. Thus came the Ahh Art Gallery. Open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturday afternoon, over its year and a half operation, there have been six different art exhibits, two theatre presentations, several art classes and a host of visiters. “I asked a number of local people to come up with 50 moments in history to celebrate Louisville’s history,” Hankins recounted. From those recollections, Hankins asked professional musician and songwriter Ryan Humbert to write five original songs. Two of those songs were sung by Humbert with his Gibson J45 guitar (a historical classic instrument).  Glory Train was sung saluting the arrival of the first train in Louisville.

Every body’s waitin’ on the Glory train, Glory train . . .

“It’s kind of like a gospel tune,” he explains. Humbert’s last song is Rattlesnake Whiskey, acknowledging that local ancestors brewed their own beverages.

That Rattlesnake whiskey is gonna’ put me in my grave . . .

ArtsinStark organized the outdoor art display of 15 4X8 sheets of art along the sidewalk last summer. “That was supposed to last three months, but by request, they were kept out for another three months,” he explained. Other wall murals included descriptions of John Shepler baptizing 12 new converts in Nimishillen Creek, the Stark Electric Railroad, the Old Grist Mill, brick making and others were posted on building walls. Hankins goal was get others involved including the school children.

The two guest artists wrapped up at one o’clock; the time seemed to have flown by.

Calendar of events

     * Feb. 27 — Mid-year assembly at the Foltz Center in East Canton.

     * March 2 — Business meeting

     * March 9  — Vince Marion discusses planning & development projects.

The meeting adjourned at 1:01 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary
Ryan Humbert and Robb Hankins

4 Way Test speech competitors: 

Back row:  Head Coach Katy Russell, Students Alexis Springer, Dylan Hoover, Alek Alspach, and Kaylyn Bennett.
Thank you to our Judges, Bob, Jen, Bob and Greg.


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 2, 2016

Rotary President Mike Snyder presided.

Meeting for a lunch of ham and scalloped potatoes at Paradise UCC Church, 21 Rotarians in attendance along with four guests shared the excitement of Rotary. The membership recited the Pledge of Allegiance and a recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test. Eva Roshong provided the invocation. Following these rituals, the members continued standing expecting the usual song, but alas, songmeister Mark Sigler was off tending to school business and missed the meeting.

 

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Jennifer Anderson announced the news that this is the 150th anniversary of the national YMCA and Stark YMCA Executive Director Tim Shetzer will speak at a celebration in Louisville Friday, March 11.

     * Jim Edwards asked for a moment of silence for John Nees, a longtime druggist and former Rotarian who passed away last week at the age of 88.

     * Bob Hallier gave a pitch for the library bond issue with the story how the children’s program yesterday had 53 children. “Our parking lot was filled,” he noted.

     * Bill Wood announced that a LHS student would be going to Italy for a Rotary-sponsored three/four week Short Term Overseas Stay this summer. “If there are any 15-19 year-olds interested in an exchange program, have them contact me,” he concluded.

A short business program

N President Snyder’s trivia question of the day: What is President Warren G. Harding’s middle name? Only a former librarian would know the answer is Gamille.

N Prez Snyder announced a thoughtful than-you note from Beech Creek Garden Center, one of our grants winners in 2015. He asked for volunteers to serve on the Community Grant Committee with Jennifer Anderson and Eva Roshong answering the call. Volunteers are also needed for the Rotary District Cultural Fair held April 30 at Zore-Boliver. Denny Valentine volunteered.

N The Taste of Louisville is set for July 13 at Water’s Edge. Vendors are needed and all members should be involved.

N Volunteers are also needed for the Chamber of Commerce Showcase set for March19 and for the Rotary 6650 annual conference April 30.

N Jim Edwards discussed the upcoming flag-posting period and made the motion to raise the annual fee from $25 to $30. The motion passed unanimously.

 

Program

Four energetic and LHS juniors, Jonathan Reynolds, Amanda Blind, Brandon Counts and Paige Haren, spoke about their experiences attending the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) conference held Feb. 19-21 at the Avalon Inn Resort in Warren. Perhaps Paige summed up the feelings of the four when she said, “I had no idea what to expect (when I went), she said. “But I didn’t want it to end. The activities were based on our level and helped us to understand the world and how to be a leader.” They agreed they learned to work with others from different backgrounds and how to organize ideas. Several said they are still in contact with new friends they made at the conference. They activities were photographed and posted on FaceBook almost instantly. There were skits and Amanda said she gained confidence in speaking in front of people because of her experience. “We had to step outside of our comfort zone,” was said. Singing was used with certain lyrics changed to R-Y-L-A. There was a career fair with representatives who actually were employed in the career they represented. And, there was good food!

All four students said they plan to attend college. Following the program, the Rotarians agreed that America’s future looked good in the hands of such students.

Calendar of events

·        March 9 — Vince Marion discusses planning & development projects.

·        March 16 — Local attorneys Laurie and Meredith give legal advice.

·        March 23 — A representative from the Ohio Oil & Gas Association.

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary

Jonathan Reynolds, Amanda Blind, Brandon Counts, Paige Haren,
           RYLA Chariperson,  Catherine Catlett.

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 9, 2016

Rotary President Mike Snyder presided. Seventeen Rotarians in attendance along with one guest shared the excitement of Rotary. The membership recited the Pledge of Allegiance; a recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test and Liz Hand gave the invocation. Songmeister Mark Sigler asked for a moment of silence in remembrance of George Martin, the “Fifth Beatle” who died last week. Unfortunately, most of us didn’t know who George Martin was, but out of our deep respect for Mark we complied before singing It’s a Grand Old Flag. Rotary District 6650 Assistant District Governor Kim Weiss attended as our guest. She hails from the East Canton Club.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Jim Edwards told of a communication from a Rotary club in Springfield, Ill. that wants to use our flag program after reading about it on our website.

     * Bob Hallier urged everyone to get out and vote next Tuesday for the library bond issue. Everyone nodded in agreement as a promise to follow through.

     * Liz Hand told of her pleasant experience while attending the Rotary Youth Exchange Conference in Cincinnati. “The stories were very powerful,” she said.

     * Bill Wood announced that a LHS student would be going to Italy for a Rotary-sponsored three/four week Short Term Overseas Stay this summer. He said there are four girls and one boy planning to participate and that only three Rotary Clubs in our District have participants.

A short business program

N Volunteers are also needed for the Chamber of Commerce Showcase set for March19 and for the Rotary 6650 annual conference April 30.

Program

Louisville Rotary Club’s own Vince Marion presented the program discussing the city’s recently completed Comprehensive Plan and took questions from the audience. 600 community stake-holders participated in various planning activities with guidance from a 10-person Steering Committee and assistance from the city administration over an eight-month period to put together the 113-page long term plan. A Planning & Economic Development Company from Bowling Green prepared and presented the final document to council for their approval at council’s Feb. 1 meeting. Council voted 5-0 to accept The plan, which replaced a Master Plan completed in 2000, cost the city about $35,000. The Comprehensive Plan is the community’s vision and strategies in areas such as community services and facilities, housing, economic development, land use and infrastructure. It has uses in shaping the quality of life for residents and business owners. The Plan will be used by the city for land use changes and for capital improvements. And citizens and developers building, developing and revitalizing neighborhoods will use it.

The Plan will assist the city be more competitive for outside grant funding and to tap into other funding sources and programs. The Plan’s colorful text, highlighted with blue and white trim, is enhanced with 47 color photographs, 35 charts & graphs, 13 illustrations and 15 full-page maps. The maps show zoning, water facilities, sanitary sewer lines, storm water facilities, undeveloped land, rental properties, concept areas, bike and walking trails and existing land use.

The planning process included seven steering committee meetings, two public community forums, two focus group sessions and a seven-month interactive Internet 17-question survey altogether collected the thoughts and ideas of over 450 residents. Survey results from 451 respondents found that 17.7% of the residents rated the quality of life in Louisville as excellent, 59.2% said it was good, 11.9% answered adequate and 9.6% said in needs improvement. Homeowners comprised 86% of those participating in the survey with less than 1% rental property owners. Seventy-three percent of those responding said they have lived in Louisville over 10 years and 20% said they were retired. Of the 18 categories for rating city services and amenities, the most important services were the public schools with fire, EMS and police services a close second. Entertainment, dining opportunities and shopping were the lowest on the services and amenities list. Forty-one percent of survey takers were asked what community improvements they would like to have and most answered was the downtown. Rental areas were next on the needs improvement list. For the future of downtown, The Plan envisions a historically quaint and lively setting through increased public and private investments in buildings and public spaces, and improved access through congestion and parking management. Respondents said more senior programming; a community message board, a splash pad and improving sidewalks and abandoned homes were major concerns.

A few of the interesting facts in the report:

4 Since 2000, the population of Louisville increased by 3% while the population of Stark County decreased by 3%. Louisville’s population is aging faster than the state and national averages. The median age for Louisville residents is 40.4 years, but in 2000, the median age was 35.8.

4 A greater percentage of local residents collect Social Security and retirement benefits (55.3%) compared to 45% nationally.

4 60% of the respondents said they feel safe walking in the community. But then a second question found 60.1% saying they never walk to places they regularly go.

4 Residents indicated a strong desire to see their neighborhoods receive code enforcement to abate property maintenance and nuisance matters.

4 Most residents (61%) thought did not feel the city should rely on being a bedroom community and that most goods and services should be accessible in the city.

4 Widening the Nickel Plate-East Main intersection was a repeated topic in sessions.

4 Connecting the Nickel Plate walking trail to the downtown area was supported.

4 Louisville’s median income is $48,401 compared to $48,308 statewide and $53,482 on the national level.

                   Calendar of events

March 16 — Local attorneys Laurie and Meredith give legal advice.

March 23 — A representative from the Ohio Oil & Gas Association.

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary
Vince Marion

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 16, 2016

       Rotary President Mike Snyder presided with 21 Rotarians and one guest in attendance at the March 16 noon meeting held at Paradise United Church of Christ. The membership recited the Pledge of Allegiance; a recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test and Liz Hand gave the invocation. Songmeister Mark Sigler picked a song suitable for the day’s program, a program presented by attorneys. He first considered Jail House Rock, then Lawyers in Love, but settled on I Fought the Law and the Law Won, a 1977 hit that was chosen by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as one of the top 500 songs that shaped rock music. Rotarians were amazed at the wealth of knowledge gained from attending Rotary meetings. Laurie McDonnell was welcomed as a guest.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Bob Hallier sadly reported that local voters turned down the library levy.

     * Mike Snyder encouraged everyone to attend the high school Cultural Fair the coming week. The Rotary had a booth attended by our two foreign exchange students, Gregoire Sprumont and Sofia Moral.

    

Program

Rotary Club’s own Meredith Simmons and guest Laurie McDonnell, both local Legal Eagles, presented a program regarding estate planning including wills, living wills, powers of attorney, durable power of attorney, trusts and more — all accompanied with advice on how to administer an estate and how to avoid probate. Wills and trusts deal with a person’s assets at death, but trusts do not go through probate while wills do. Trusts work in life and death. Both wills and trusts are governed by state law, but are under different sets of law. Each is a creation of law and is subject to the law.

When a person dies without a will, it is called dying intestate. We also learned the difference between an heir and a beneficiary. One cannot disinherit a legally married spouse, but in the event of a divorce, the X cannot claim part of the estate and stepchildren would only receive a portion of the assets after the natural or bloodline family members. In Ohio, one cannot legally leave money for a dog or pet. A will cannot circumvent the law and one cannot transfer an item he does not own. It is not recommended placing directions for a funeral in a will and a will cannot force a recipient to get married or change religion to receive an inheritance.

A Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA) is a legal designation as soon as it is signed for a person to handle the personal affaires for someone whether or not the person who writes it is capable or incapacitated. A Living Will is a document that expresses the person's wishes regarding end-of-life decisions.  It does not give anybody authority to make decisions, but it does list people to contact if it has to be enacted. A Health Care POA allows someone to make medical decisions for one, but does not override a Living Will.

Distribution of assets placed in trusts will be completed a lot smoother than through Probate Court, where the court would have complete control. There is considerable difference between a revocable and an irrevocable trust. There are

Different tax consequences in the type of trust used. Once an irrevocable trust is completed, it cannot be changed. It might be a good idea to place some assets in a revocable trust and others in an irrevocable trust. Estate planning should be done when a person has a clear mind and remember deathbed bequeaths are not binding. There is a five-year look back for Medicaid help for nursing care.

Consult an attorney before making estate-planning decisions.

McDonnell and Simmons have offices at 315 S. Chapel St. in Louisville and may be reached by calling 330-875-7340.

 

                   Calendar of events

March 30 — Louisville Athletic Director John Twinem

April 2 — Trail clean up

April 6 — Business meeting

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary


Laurie McDonald and Meredith Simmons Attorneys at Law






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Mike Chadsey


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 30, 2016

          President Mike Snyder opened the meeting with 22 Rotarians and one guest in attendance at the March 30 noon session held at Paradise United Church of Christ. The membership recited the Pledge of Allegiance; Rotary’s Four-Way Test and Liz Hand gave the invocation. Unfortunately, the secretary did not get the guest’s name.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Liz Hand told of a website called StarkFunders.org that is free for non-profit organizations to advertise their fundraising activities.

     * Cynthia Kerchner is back from Florida and is already working on this season’s Farmers Market. She said there are a lot of activities planned for the summer that the club should have a presence.

     * Jim Edwards praised Ted Burwell for his handling of Jim’s mother’s funeral held March 29.

     * Betty Derry reminded everyone to get their tickets for the 6th annual Louisvile-Nimishillen Township Historical Dinner held at Brookside Farm Tuesday, May 10.

     * Mike Snyder encouraged everyone to attend the Friends of the Library annual membership meeting Friday, April 15 from 7-9 at the library. Also, Mike requested volunteers for the Chamber of Commerce 5K race Saturday, April 16 at 8:30 a.m. Proceeds will go toward the Veteran’s Memorial Restoration project.

Program

John Twinem, Athletic Director for the Louisville Schools, presented the program with a discussion of what the future holds for the district’s athletic program and he gave an update on the athletic league situation. Twinem is a Canton McKinley graduate and played football for the Bulldogs. He later coached there and once coached the Stark County All-Star game where he practiced and worked with others from Louisville. It was his first visit here, and he said he liked it. Later, he was hired as the district AD. Future plans the Athletic Department include:

     * An auxiliary gymnasium for the high school — on the horizon.

     * Tennis Court upgrades.

     * Concession stand & restroom for the north end of the stadium.

     * Upgrade our athletic schedules.

There are two fundraisers planned that will include LHS alumni. The 1st annual all-sports auction will be held this fall. It will be low cost, wear your Leopard gear, food by Carolina Barbeque with an athletic theme and a tailgate atmosphere. The Touchdown Pledge will be available again this fall. Every time the Leopards score a touchdown, the pledge adds up. Over the last few years, Louisville has averaged 56 TDs each season and last year the project brought $10,000 into the athletic fund.

 

Last year lacrosse was added to the list of sporting offerings at the high school with now a total of 22 sports for students to choose. Girl’s lacrosse competition, which is considerably different from boy’s lacrosse, was begun this year. Interscholastic gymnastics was also added this year.

The league update. In case one has not heard, Louisville is now alone in the NBC as the other 7 schools have withdrawn from the league and are going to form a new league sans Louisville. Twinem has discussed league possibilities with three different leagues in northeast Ohio; the Federal League, (Stark County), the Suburban League (Summit County), and the All-American League (mostly Mahoning & Columbiana counties). There have been no formal offers from them, nor has there been any requests from Louisville for admittance. There is a possibility of going alone, but the problems are scheduling for 22 different sports including programs for boys and girls and for high and middle schools. “We are trying to get this right,” he said. Louisville is currently the largest school among the NBC schools, but if the grade school enrollment is counted, before long Alliance will have a larger enrollment than Louisville. Just a few schools were driving the Louisville exit, but the other schools did not want left out and joined the dissidents.

Questions from the floor

Was our Little Leopards program a problem for the other league schools? Yes, in their mind it is an issue. Perhaps some schools don’t want to put the work into getting better.

Are there other issues besides “competitive balance” that has worked against Louisville behind the scenes? Not that I am aware of.

Will our athletes lose in the scholarship hunt without a league affiliation? No.

Twinem discussed the various OHSAA classifications including the difference between Louisville in Division III for football, but is classified in Division I for other sports.

With the current arrangement matching public and parochial schools in the same tournament or playoffs, is this fair and what is being done to change it? I don’t think it is fair, but at this time there is nothing planned to change it. The only way to change the imbalance is to separate the two types of schools.

Calendar of events

April 6 — Business meeting

April 9 — Trail clean up, Saturday, April 9. Meet at Greg Anderson’s home at doughnuts.

April 13 — John Burnquist on Transitioning out of a business.

 

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

John Twinem