Louisville Rotary Meetings 2014     
2nd Quarter
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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 2, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided for the luncheon meeting held at Paradise UCC Church with 23 Rotarians and one special guest in attendance. Jim Edwards led the Pledge of Allegiance; Ted Burwell gave the invocation; the Rotary 4-Way Test was recited and Songmaster Mark Sigler led the singing of Happy Birthday to our club which is now 89 years old.

Jim Edwards introduced guest Roger Squire, owner of a heating & cooling company located in downtown Louisville.

Happy Dollars

*  Cynthia Kerchner said she is glad to be back from Florida and thanked the members for remembering her husband Frank with a card and in our prayers during his recovery.

* Maranda Ramsey gave another pitch for the Boy Scout rose sale and reminded members of the $10 card to promote her chance to be a prom queen. It’s all for charity.

* Chuck  McLaughlin told of his near-tragic brush with emergency surgery to restore vision to his left eye. Blind in the eye on Friday, into ER on Saturday, surgery on Sunday. Although his restored eyesight is not perfect, he’s glad to have any vision. His story is a reminder of how fragile life is and how much we take life for granted.

* Yvette Blandford was inducted into membership by Greg Anderson. Eva told of how one club she knows of inducts a new member with a joint shot of whiskey. Members agreed this needs to be studied.

Today is the first of the month so it must be our business meeting

Treasurer Jared Shive gave the treasurer’s report. Flag fees are coming in giving our checking account a little over $10,000. We are accepting grant applications now.

Flags — Flag Czar Ken Smith announced that our first posting – Memorial Day – is coming Monday, May 26 and prepare to place flags on Friday, Saturday or Sunday before the 26th. There may be a flag work session TBA later.

Bill Wood announced that Liz Hand had taken our two exchange students on a shopping trip, with a meal and a movie. Kirha had just been moved to her new family, but forgot her address and new phone number. Thanks to Bill, she finally got home about midnight. Typical teenager.

Membership — Jared. Applications for Yvette Blandford and Catherine Catlett were accepted.

Maranda Ramsey announced she would prepare a graphic about the club’s support to the Dominican Project.

Rotary Foundation— Greg Anderson & Jim Edwards. Reminder of the Every Member Every Year fund. Our members are not close to meeting the goal. Jim wants to find ways to make it easier. Our yearly goal is set at $1,000 per year.

Future projects — Greg Anderson. He gave an update on the library fundraising. Sometime in May the Library Board should be ready for an active campaign. It’s moving along, he said.

Economic Development — The decision was made to support the downtown Farmer’s Market. There will be an Economic Development committee meeting following next week’s meeting.

Greg Anderson reminded the membership there would be a walking trail clean up soon. The date will be determined at our next meeting.

Eva announced that Rotary signs are now completed and installed at both the north and south entrances to the city. And, our club’s $1,000 donation makes us the official sponsor for the Constitution Parade.

Maternal and child health — Liz Hand. Liz told the touching story of how our funding of the lice program has helped families deal with this problem. This has turned out to be a very worthwhile service project that is little known in our community.

 

The meeting was adjourned at 1.

Upcoming events

April 9 — Kathleen Wieschaus-Voss speaks about an outstanding American

April 16 — Superintendent Steve Milano speaks about the Louisville School programs

 

Respectfully submitted,  +

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 9, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided. Meeting for lunch at Paradise UCC Church, 24 Rotarians and 4 guests attended. Song leader Mark Sigler was absent so there was no group sing following the Pledge of Allegiance and the recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test. Liz Hand aptly provided the invocation. Guests included Mark Brunner with Mike Snyder; Vince Marion with Tom Ault; and two persons accompanying the speaker Kathleen Wieschaus-Voss.

Happy Dollars

     * Liz Hand received a hearty round of applause from the members as she proudly mentioned her family was expanding. When the spirited applause died, Liz explained she and her husband had purchased baby chicks and they intended to raise chickens.

     * Betty Derry thanked everyone for their concern over her surgery and for the flowers the club sent. She reminded the club about the traveling the Changing America exhibit that is coming to Louisville for six weeks from July 12 through August 22, a joint project of the Louisville Library and the Louisville-Nimishillen Historical Society.

     * Cynthia Kerchner was thankful for the club’s lead in promoting the Downtown Farmers Market set for the first Saturday of each month over the summer.

     * City Manager Tom Ault introduced the city’s new planning director, Vince Marion.

     * Denny Valentine was thankful for recent eye surgery, which he said, gave him new eyes.

     Nicole Gandee thanked the members for their support of the open house at Oakhill Manor Care. She announced than 150 people attended.

Program

The legacy of folk artist Ferdinand A. Brader as presented by Kathleen Wieschaus-Voss was the program. Wieschaus-Voss is an appraiser of fine arts & antiques.

Brader was an iterant folk artist who traveled the countryside sketching pictures of rural and village scenes during the 1880s and early 1890s. The interesting program began with Brader’s large drawing of the George Diller Brewery which was once located on West Main Street in Louisville. The sketch, which belongs to drug store owner Paul White, caught members’ attention.

Brader, born in Switzerland in 1833, left his native country and landed in Birks County, Pennsylvania. He traveled around doing his art in return for food and shelter. He is credited with completing 980 drawings of which 211 have been found and are still available, although many are in private collections. Of those 211 drawings, 115 of them were Ohio locations, most in Nimishillen Township. The artist completed 56 drawings in Pennsylvania, but Stark County was the center of Brader’s art accomplishments. All his work is done in black & white.

Locally, one of his works is the house on Brookside Farms located on Ravenna Street. The house is still there. He also did sketches of two homes in Harrisburg and both of them are still standing and are lived in today. The original home of the Dennis Biery family was sketched and that home is a part of their current residence.

Brader liked to sketch himself in his drawings, and often used children, animals and farm machinery.

In his declining years, he took up residence in a county home. Sometime there, he inherited a large sum of money and shortly afterward sometime in 1895 he disappeared. He eventually wrote a letter informing people that he was back in Switzerland where he lived out his final years.

The story has a happy ending, but the courts had to decide who received the bulk of his estate which was finally settled in 1919.

The Canton Museum of Art will hold an exhibit of his work beginning in December of 2014 and running through March 15, 2015.

Upcoming meetings

April 16 – Steve Milano, the Louisville School Superintendent

April 25 – Exchange student Fiorella Pillonetta

April 30 – Exchange student Kiriha Nakagama

May 7 — Business meeting

The meeting adjourned at 1:10 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,   Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 16, 2014

President-elect Bill Wood and Sergeant-at-Arms Dave Yeagley filled in for president Eva who was unable to attend the meeting. There were 28 Rotarians and 4 guests present. Song leader Mark Sigler brought tears to many eyes as the group song for the day was the Louisville High School Alma mater. Ted Burwell and Ken Smith tried to get through the Massillon HS song, but their voices didn’t have that football player sound usually associated with Washington High School. Doug Swartz, Tom Pukys, Rhonda Griffin, Laura Krstevski and Brian Beatty were guests.

Happy Dollars

     * Betty Derry asked for prayers for her adopted granddaughter who was recently diagnosed with cancer.

     * Ted Burwell told the story about his ride from the Pittsburgh airport with a stranger, who turned out not to be a stranger. Doug Swartz, a former president of the Louisville Rotary Club, was the Good Samaritan, and Ted re-paid his debt by having him as a guest for our meeting.

     * Steve Roberts brought Chamber of Commerce President Laura Krstevski and Chamber Executive Director Rhonda Griffin to the meeting and introduced them.

     * Greg Anderson delivered his daughter’s Girl Scout cookies to Betty Derry, who had been out with surgery.

                             Program

Rotarian Stephen Milano, who happens to be the Superintendent of the Louisville School District, presented the program. He began with an introduction of himself and how he got to Louisville from neighboring Plain Local Schools. Steve’s Louisville roots date from his days at St. Thomas Aquinas High School where he graduated in 1975. At Ohio University, he played basketball and returned to work in Stark County as a teacher and coach. He coached at Louisville in 1991, a year the Leopards made the play-offs. At the time, there were no teaching openings in the Louisville District, but he did make friends with Principal Polly Doyle. In 2008, Doyle retired, but called Steve and suggested he apply for her job — which he did. Last summer, David Redd, also a Rotarian, retired, and recommended Steve for the superintendent’s position. The rest is history.

Steve, who is the father of two sons and three stepsons, thanked Redd and said the superintendent never micro-managed his building and always supported him. Milano had high praise for the staff, the Board of Education members and the kids. “Always make your decisions on what’s best for the kids,” he said. “I try to live by that.”

Milano discussed some of his first year challenges including the make-up of 8 snow days and the introduction of Blizzard Bags. Some Ohio districts missed 24 days, he said. He discussed “common core” ideas that will allow students moving from one district to another to be in sync with what’s was left behind. But, he said, “We are testing kids . . . out of their minds.” One of the problems this year as the state moved to on-line testing is that Louisville does not have enough computers for all the students to take the tests at the same time. He discussed the 3rd grade mandatory reading test and said Louisville has only 19 students who have not made the grade on the reading test. (There is a summer program planned for them.) Even the school principals have a new evaluation system that is partially based on the school’s performance on the state-testing program.

Louisville’s enrollment is declining due, according to Steve, that couples are having fewer children. The 2014 enrollment is 3045, down 45 from last year. This year’s graduating class is 254, but this year’s pre-kindergarten classes are 210. Open enrollment has helped make up the difference and without Open Enrollment, the system would have lost about 200 students. Open Enrollment, he said, helps us keep our classes where they are.

In answer to a question posed by Jim Edwards, he said Louisville has about 90 kids either home schooled or attending charter schools. To counter this trend, Milano said the district is looking at blended classes — this plan would allow home-schooled students to take some classes in school and some at home. Home schoolers can participate in the school’s extra-curricular programs.

The cost to educate a student in Louisville is about $7,100, the second lowest cost among the 16 Stark County School Districts. This year, the state changed the funding formula for the 4th time over the last six years, but in a nutshell, Louisville receives 58.35% of $5,745 state dollars per student with the exception of special education students who fall under a different formula. This year the Louisville School spent $2.4 million dollars educating special needs children.

As the clock neared 1 o’clock, Steve wanted one more fact out there — with the high school’s duel enrollment plan, this year’s graduates earned 816 college credits, so think of the cost savings for parents.

Upcoming meetings

April 25 –. Exchange student Fiorella Pillonetta

April 30 – Exchange student Kiriha Nakagama

May 7 — Business meeting

The meeting adjourned at 1:10 p.m.

 Respectfully submitted,   Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 23, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided over the meeting with 23 Rotarians and six guests enjoying the lasagna luncheon prepared by the Paradise Church members. Guests included were Kris Jones who came with Pat Richardson, Vivian Wood, Donna Hall, Sarah Roshong and our two foreign exchange students, Fiorella Pillonetta and Kiriha Nakagama.

Happy Dollars

     * Betty Derry announced there were now over 200 people paid to attend the 3rd annual Louisville-Nimishillen Historical Society dinner fundraiser planned for Brookside Farm.

     * Jim Edwards announced the club was behind in flag renewals.

Club Business

     N Eva reminded everyone about the District Conference May 2-3 in Youngstown. She said our club was participating in the baked cookie contest.

     N The club still needs a queen candidate to sponsor for the Constitution Week activities.

     N Lance & Kris Leach are moving to Georgia and it was suggested to email them good-bye.

     N Bill Wood discussed the district scholarship for outbound students and suggested a $250 contribution. Dave Yeagley requested the idea be tabled until our monthly business meeting and it was so decided.

     N Ken Smith moved to give $50 from the Happy Dollars fund to the After Prom activity at the high school. Liz Hand seconded the idea.

     N Flag Czar Ken Smith reminded everyone of the flag assembly work session at next Wednesday 6:30 at the Flag Barn

     N Members were reminded to attend the Walking Trail Clean-up Saturday morning at 8 a.m. We are to meet at Greg Anderson’s house on Park Village Drive. Dave Yeagley suggested that Greg have coffee and donuts waiting.

                                Program

Bill Wood introduced our program speaker Fiorella Pillonetta with Fiorella’s host mother Donna Hall present for support and encouragment. Fiorella used a power point to show scenes from her native Argentina and began her message with the geography of her country including such details as the capital (Buenos Aires), Argentina’s population (40 million), language (Spanish), currency (the pesos) and its religion (Catholic). 88% of the population lives in cities while 12% is rural. The country’s national sport is soccer. She has one sister and her mother is a teacher of special students and her father is in a construction business that builds houses. With her host family, she has four brothers. She communicates with her family over a computer.

While in America, Fiorella said her favorite American food is macaroni & cheese. There are McDonald’s and Burger King restaurants in the Argentine cities, but not in the villages and smaller cities. She loves sports including volleyball and softball and Fiorella made the LHS softball team. This year was her first experience on the ski slopes.

Perhaps one of her favorite memories will be the Rotary-sponsored trips and activities where she has met other exchange students from around the world. She will be returning to Argentina in July following a Rotary trip to California in June.

 

Upcoming meetings

April 30 – Exchange student Kiriha Nakagama

May 7 — Business meeting

The meeting adjourned at 1:10 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,   Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

April 30, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives!

President Eva Roshong presided over the meeting with 21 Rotarians and three guests enjoying a Japanese-flavored meal. Guests included Vivian Wood, Brian Beatty, who chipped and helped stuff envelops, and Kiriha Nakagama’s first host parent Dave Kibler.

Happy Dollars

     * David Yeagley is happy his son Nathan is returning from his year as an outbound student to Brazil and his daughter Catherine is graduating from Kent State with a bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts, all in the same week.

     * Bob Hallier is happy the hummingbirds are back from their winter in South America.

     * Maranda Ramsey spoke on behalf of Betty Derry to remind everyone about the Lsv.-NT Historical Society dinner at Brookside.

Club Business

     N Cynthia Kerschner reminded Rotarians to participate in this Saturday’s Farmer’s Market in downtown Louisville. “Wear your Rotary shirts!” 

     N Jim Edwards encouraged fellow Rotarians to help fold, stuff and seal flag payment notices.

     N Flag Czar Ken Smith reminded everyone of the flag assembly work session that night 6:30 at the Flag Barn. Eight Rotarians worked and assembled 75 flags. Following the work, Bob Hallier, Al Gress, Dave Yeagley and Jim Edwards convened at Bud’s Corner for a strategic evaluation of the merits of Bud Lite, Guinness and Sam Adams. No decision was reached.

                                Program

Bill Wood, who expertly handles our exchange student program with help from Vivian, Denny Valentine and Liz Hand, spoke about the exchange program. There are inbound, outbound and rebound students involved. Rebounds are students who were outbound but are now returning. The federal government gets involved in the exchange program and thinks of it as a good will program in America’s foreign policy. There are a myriad of laws and regulations involved getting student visas. Host families are the backbone of making the program successful and our club has been involved with the program for over 20 years. We nearly always have girls and there will be an effort next year for a young man to participate. Our club pays for visa fees, provides a $75 a month stipend, pays school fees and provides school lunches. We also pay for two trips, one to Washington, D.C. and the other to New York City.

Bill introduced Kiriha Nakagama, our exchange student from Japan.

Nakagama provided a power point picture graph of her country and began by sharing some data about Japan. The country has a population of 127 million living in a landmass of 2,128 square miles. She discussed one fundamental difference between the Japanese language and English that has given her a problem mastering. The placement of verbs and nouns in sentence structure are opposite in the two languages.

Mt. Fugi, an active volcano, is the largest mountain in Japan, and sumo wrestling is the national sport. Japan is known for cherry blossoms. Tokyo, the country’s capitol, has the tallest communications tower in the world. The 2020 Olympics will be held in Japan. Makagama’s home is in Fifu City, an area of two million persons.

One of her adjustments in America is food. She enjoys rice for almost every meal back home. She eats with chopsticks. Students take their lunches to school in lunch boxes packed by their mothers. There are no cafeterias in Japanese schools and students ware uniforms that include jackets. In the heat of summer, the jackets can be removed. Her school has two sport festivals a year compete with fireworks. It’s a community event that most everyone attends.

Transportation is by train and students have passes to ride back and forth to school, although Nakagama rides her bicycle to school unless it rains.

The pictures of the earthquake of March 11, 2011 caught everyone’s attention. The country has not recovered from that disaster, according to Nakagama. There were many children that survived, but lost their parents and other family members. “Please don’t forget what happened,” she asked.

She enjoys volleyball and square dancing but misses Japanese food. She has made many friends from all over the world at Rotary get-togethers. Her host parents are Dave and Sharon Kibler, first six months, and Tim and Yvette Blandford, last six months.

Nakagama expects to return to America someday.

“Thank-you Rotary for hosting me,” she concluded.

Upcoming meetings

May 7 — Business meeting

May 14 — Making smart people smart by Celia King

The meeting adjourned at 1:10 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,   Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 7, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives!

        President Eva Roshong presided over the meeting with 23 Rotarians and five guests attending. Guests included Rotary District 6650 Vice-Governor Kim Weiss from Minerva, Tom Jackson a Rotarian from Houston, Texas in Louisville visiting family, and Nick Lucas from Consumers National Bank. There were two other special guests brought by Jim Edwards — Lily and Lillia his two youthful granddaughters. (Jim was babysitting)

  Song Master Mark Sigler led the group in singing Take Me Out to a Ballgame in honer of the Cleveland Indians upcoming home stand.

Happy Dollars

  * Bill Wood was thankful for surviving the weekend with 36 exchange student teenagers while attending the Rotary convention in Youngstown.

  * Tom Jackson shared how his Houston club, with 31 members, has 12 outbound students and hosts 3 or 4 inbound students each year. Their major project is the Wounded Warrior Program.

Club Business & Work Session

       Treasurer’s Report. Jared Shive gave the report saying our fiscal year is winding down. We have $67 cash on hand; $12,687.11 in the Consumers Bank checking account; $5,024.00 in our Key Bank Disaster Fund and $15,289.14 in the Louisville Community Foundation Account for our pledge for the new library-community center.

   Flag Czar & Flag  Recorder – Smith & Edwards – traveled to the Austintown Rotary meeting to share our flag program with them. We currently have 850 paid subscribers.

   Next Year’s Exchange Student. a Bill Wood said we would be hosting a boy from Hungary in the fall. He will be the first boy since 1991 and this young man is an athlete who likes to play baseball.

   Light up Rotary. Our next year’s motto. Eva reminded us to wear our pins. She said Wooster has the largest club in our District and next year’s conference will be hosted in Wooster.

   District Outbound Scholarship Fund. So far, 6 outbound students have applied for scholarship help for their overseas trips. Of the District’s 46 clubs, only 15 or 16 have outbound students. K. Smith moved to allot $250 to the Scholarship Fund and J. Edwards seconded the motion. Passed unanimously.

  

Taste of Louisville. The Venue is secured. The Chamber of Commerce does not want to partner with the Rotary, but no one knows why. It was discussed to split the profits this year between the Food Pantry and the Warm Coats programs. Eva said we need an organization committee and it was decided the club board would be the committee. The date is Wednesday, July 16.

Membership. Greg Beatty was approved for membership.

Volunteer Flag workers. It was decided to invite all volunteer flag workers and one guest.

Annual dinner. Denny Valentine announced the original speaker copped out and the new speaker is the CEO of the Canton Art Museum.

The meeting adjourned at 1 p.m.

Upcoming events

May 14 — Making smart people smart by Celia King

May 14 — Disaster preparedness for business and home

June 9 — Farmer’s Market

 

Respectfully submitted,   Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 14, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives!

        President Eva Roshong presided over the meeting with an embarrassing 15 members and two guests in attendance. One of the guests was Hannah Roshong, Eva’s daughter who is a sophomore at LHS. The other guest was our program speaker Celia King.

      Liz Hand gave a beautiful prayer, and Song Master Mark Sigler led us in an emotional singing of America the Beautiful.

Happy Dollars

  * Betty Derry was thankful for the great dinner for the Louisville-Nimishillen Township Historical Society hosted with a guest list of 200.

  * Jim Edwards was thankful the club now has 1,002 paid flag patrons. “Things are going really good! said Cheerful Jim.

Club Business

       president’s Report. Eva reminded members to find a queen candidate for us to sponsor for Constitution Week. It costs the club about $100 to support a candidate.

   She also passed out a photo of students standing around a computer in a school in Dominica that our contributions paid for. (The computer, not the school)

   We discussed The Taste of Louisville and we now have the first food vendor lined up.

   Flag Czar Ken Smith. Asked for assistance in preparing the toolboxes for this week’s flag raising. Ron Derry announced that he found his lost crowbar under the front seat of his truck, so Smith was not to replace his.

   Cynthia kerchner. Suggested the club set up a stand at the next Farmer’s Market to sell pop, chips and snacks, but there were no volunteers to do it. It was suggested we contact Arts in Stark for an activity. There was discussion about advertising and posting yard signs which we have 20. They go up the morning of the event. Betty Derry suggested every member do an email blast to their address book friends urging them to attend the Farmer’s Market.

The Program

   Celia King, representing Arrants McSwain Leadership Development, a Canton company that does leadership-training programs for business, industry, churches and schools, was our speaker. She began by discussing personality tests and their effectiveness. King grouped personality tests into groups such as conversation starters, the MBTI Master Practioners, the Myers Briggs Theory and Type Talk.

There are a number of good books on the market to understanding and evaluation of personality types and she recommended Introduction to Type, Building Blocks of Personality, Functions of Type, Was it Really Me? and People Types and Tiger Stripes.

The discussion of cultural intelligence, how we see the world, was an interesting topic that helps people see the world as other cultures do. Emotional intelligence and stress/anxiety management were sub-topics covered. King said emotions are contagious so how do we manage our emotions? That’s where professional trainers come in.

King concluded her talk with five questions to ask when hiring a consultant.

1. Do you have someone in house who can do this work for you?

2. Do you need fresh eyes on the situation?

3. Who does most of the talking/

4. When do you get to say “let’s continue” or “no thanks”?

5. Is it worth it?

Negotiate the relationship up front before the project starts. Have an understanding of the nature of the work and the length of the project with a clear and comprehensive communication between you and the consultant on time frame, expectations, methods of communication, fees, etc.

Upcoming events

 

May 21 — Disaster preparedness for business and home — Steve Toohey

May 28 — Leadership Stark 27th Class — Eva Roshong

June 9 — Farmer’s Market

 

Respectfully submitted,   Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 21, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives

President Eva Roshong called the meeting to order with 21 Rotarians and 5 guests in attendance. Guests included Veronica Violand, a pre-pharmacy student at Kent State Stark; Nate Yeagley, Ana Haker, a middle school student in North Canton who is shadowing Maranda Ramsely; and Rotary exchange students Kiriha Nakagawa and Fiorella Pillonetta. Our scheduled speaker could not make it, so the meeting was a general discussion of Rotary activities and interests.

Happy Dollars

* Betty Derry is happy to report that the Louisville—Nimishillen Historical Society now has a membership of over 200 persons! 

* Pat Richardson is happy to advertise the Louisville Area Y’s 9th Annual 2 Mile/10K run on Sat. 8, June 7 at 8:00 a.m.  Register now and save a few dollars!  

* It was also reported that the first Farmers Market of the year will be on that same day and everyone will be encouraged to volunteer to make this event another success!

 * Mike Snyder is happy to have traveled to Europe and to have had the chance opportunity to fly over (at 35,000 feet) the Normandy Beaches in France.  He is also happy to report that the Louisville Energy Savers program is at 56% of its goal and he urges all members to visit their Website for more information:  www.energysavers2014.com.

Club Business

N Denny Valentine volunteered to compose a letter to the non-Rotary flag volunteers who will be invited to our annual banquet on Wed., June 25. 

N Ken Smith reported that the flags are being posted even as we speak and he encouraged the volunteers to call Thaine Boldon if the flag hole is not located after a 3-minute search.  Jim Edwards reported that we have about 1,080 flag customers!

N Our Rotary exchange students would like to visit Niagara Falls and see a Cleveland Indians game within the next three weeks, if possible.  Contact Bill Wood, if you are able to assist. 

N President Roshong reported that the North Canton Rotary is interested in taking a bus to see a Rubber Ducks baseball game. Several members were interested and this issue will be introduced at a later date.

 

 President Roshong asked the membership for topics for next year:

·         President-Elect Bill Wood requested that members come up with ideas to grow the membership (ours was flat this current year because of a few resignations). In addition, he would like to determine the feasibility of creating another work project similar to the downtown gazebo and the Metzger Park restrooms. He is asking for committees to consider a possible work project and be prepared to discuss it later.

·         Bob Hallier indicated that we might want to consider assisting the Library with a couple of projects at the Old Post Office, specifically, a new roof and a new HVAC system.

·         Dave Yeagley indicated that we might want to consider a small-scale water project such as the Frog Pond in Boston Commons.

·         On the subject of the Library, Bob Hallier and Jason Buydos reported that a consultant has been retained and he will be making his report soon regarding the feasibility of developing a combined Library and Community Center on the site of the former Louisville Middle School.

·         President Roshong distributed a flyer for the 2nd. Annual Taste of Louisville, which is scheduled for Weds., July 16, from 5:00 to 7 :30 p.m. This event will be held again at the Waters Edge.

·         There will be a silent auction and 50/50 drawing with proceeds benefitting the Community Cupboard and Operation Warm Coats for Kids. Pat Richardson reported that we will focus on K-2 students at both Louisville Elementary and North Nim. Elementary schools. We have also applied for a $2,500 grant for additional coats for kids.

·         As a reminder we partnered with the Chamber of Commerce last year and our club donated $3,000 in proceeds to the Community Cupboard.

·         There will be 25 restaurants and vendors represented at this year’s event and we will sell our own bottled water as a fundraiser. We will not work with the liquor vendor from last year and there will be other options explored. Assuming everything goes according to plan, and we are able to secure sponsorships, our club could make as much as $7,000!

Upcoming Meetings:

May 28 “Leadership Stark 27th Class” – Eva Roshong

Soon      Outbound Exchange Student, Nate Yeagley

June 4        Last Business and Board Meeting of the Year!

Respectfully submitted by veteran secretary Mike Snyder

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

May 28, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives

President Eva Roshong called the meeting to order with 22 Rotarians and a guest in attendance. Fiorella Pillonetta, our foreign exchange student, enjoyed the pasta and salad luncheon with us. Jim Edwards, a retired Air Force pilot and officer, gave a lesson on how to stand at attention for the Pledge of Allegiance. Back straight, feet together toes slightly pointed out, hands at the side, tighten butt. Members followed Edward’s direction wondering where this lesson was headed. Later, Andy Turowski, who spent five years in the Army, quipped that he didn’t remember the tight butt guideline. Following the Pledge, the National Anthem was sung, which sounded pretty good. Perhaps it was the butt tightening. And so the meeting began.

So why is this event reported in the club’s official minutes?

This secretary feels it symbolic of a club camaraderie, a period of levity enjoyed by each member who takes service before self very important, yet can still find a little humor in the middle of the day before returning to the challenges of making a living. Jim reminds us of the Teddy Bear hiding inside all of us.

Happy Dollars

* Betty Derry shared her happiness from last week’s weekend get away at a Cambridge B&B with husband Ron, perhaps a seemly simple pleasure for a couple still in love after 50 years of marriage.

* Maranda Ramsey told of taking our two exchange students to Akron for the Color Run.

* Catherine Catlett expressed thanks for the wonderful weather we’ve had for the last few days.

Club Business

N Special mention to our club treasurer Jared who was featured in the Canton Repository as one of the Top 20 Under 40 group in Stark County. Did you know that Jared was an accomplished musician and plays in a local symphony orchestra? Facebook comments refer to Jarad as a Rotarian, a tech guy, a DIYer and a wannabe Mr. Fix It. Jarad, we are proud to be of your company!

N Ken Smith told the story of his visit to the Austintown Rotary meeting. Following his flag presentation, they donated a book in his honor to the Austintown Library. Ken thought this was an idea worth considering.

N Jim Edwards thanked all the members who did the flag posting. There were at least 60, maybe 80 flag bases lost and Thane Bolden was the one who went out and placed a new base and flag for those lost. Jim announced we have 1,145 paid subscribers, not quite the 1,154 we had last year, but Jim is confident that by the end of the year we will reach 1,200.

 

 

The Program

Eva shared with us her yearlong experience as a member of the 27th class of Leadership Stark, a 40-member program began by the Canton Chamber of Commerce to develop leadership among Stark residents by helping people know more about Stark County. The members were from all types of vocations ranging from attorneys to Goodwill workers. “They were a diverse group,” she will tell you. Meeting once a month, each session dealt with a different aspect of leadership, from boardsmanship, Stark County history, leadership styles, building teamwork and learning about one’s own skills.

The session began with a 48-hour experience held at Atwood Lake Lodge. “What used to work may not work now,” Eva learned. “And everyone has strengths to make a good club or organization.”

In October, the group traveled by bus throughout Stark County traveling over 100 miles to see the diversity of the area. The Hartville muck farms and the number of Mexican farm workers who live and work in the county touched Eva. The visit to Akron-Canton Airport was highlighted by a talk given by the CEO of Southeast Airlines. They had lunch at Keenan Advantage (A trucking company) located in North Canton. “We had major corporate leaders meet with us and talk about their businesses,” she commented.

Meeting with the various human service organizations was impressive, according to Eva. She was particularly impressed with the Goodwill campus in southwest Canton, a one-stop location for many of the community’s social services. “Goodwill does a lot more than just sell used clothes,” she commented. The group role-played in an effort to better understands the problems of the poor.

There was Education Day, with trips to see what is available locally for those interested in improving their skills. Eva was particularly impressed with the ROTC program offered at Perry High School. April was Cultural Arts Day and there was Justice Day where they got to sit as a jury in a courtroom and listen to Judge Haas speak about criminal justice.

With time running out, Eva said “It’s been a great year and I hope some of you can do this . . . I found out who I am.”

 

Upcoming Meetings

Soon      Outbound Exchange Student, Nate Yeagley

June 4        Last Business and Board Meeting of the Year!

 

Allen Gress, Secretary

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

June 4, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives

President Eva Roshong called the meeting to order with 18 Rotarians and one guest in attendance. Veronica Violand enjoyed lunch with us and is considering joining. Today was a business meeting and is the last meeting under Eva’s leadership with Bill Wood taking the club’s helm in July. Incidentally, there will be no July 2 meeting due to the Fourth holiday.

Happy Dollars

* Yvette Blandford is thankful her daughter Marcie is coming home in 26 days from her year in France as an outbound Rotary exchange student. Recently, Marcie completed a 6-event triathlon. Yvette also reminded Rotarians of the upcoming Friends of the Library book sale Saturday, June 7.

* Pat Richardson reminded all of the Y races this Saturday morning.

* Mike Snyder reminded Rotarians today was the 80th anniversary of D-Day.

Club Business

N  Treasurer’s Report. Jared reported — by email — May income of $11,595 with over 300 flag checks in deposit. May expense was $2,873.70. Jim Edwards stressed it was important for us to have a budget so the amount of grants would be known. From his request, Bill Wood said there would be a budget meeting set soon and he would email those members.

One financial concern was the amount of money the club puts into school awards such as the Arian and Howard Smith band honors, the Hall of Achievement and the scholarship award. It was decided to clarify costs and cap the amounts beginning for the next school year.

FLAGS. Ken Smith suggested flag posting for Monday holidays be Tues, Wed. and Thurs. because if there were a lost posthole, Thane would have to go out on a Saturday. Members nodded in agreement. It was discussed by Jim Edwards to raise the flag fee from $25 to $30. Most other clubs charge at least $30.

It was suggested we obtain a lock box for the Flag barn as a way to shorten the number of trips Ken Smith or other leaders would have, but no action was taken.

The question of keeping flags up between Memorial Day and Flag Day was discussed, but it was decided this year was not the time to make a change. Scooter Israel had a compromise — instead of a 2-week gap between Memorial Day – Flag Day — July 4th which would be 3 trips out and back, go with two. The issue will be discussed later.

Youth Exchange. Our two girls are at Niagara Falls with Maranda Ramsey and her husband. Our incoming student is from Hungary and is an athlete. He wishes to play basketball, baseball and soccer while here.

Congratulations. Rotarian Chuck McLaughlin was elected president of the Louisville Kiwanis Club with his term beginning this fall. You can’t keep leadership down!

 N Taste of Louisville. The Venue is secured. Eva said we need an organization committee and it was decided the club board would be the committee. The date is Wednesday, July 16 and Biery Cheese has agreed to participate. Eva hopes to get Biery Cheese to fund the tickets. The decision on the bar was discussed but no action taken. The club will sell water for $1 and Jim Edwards will take care of this. We must get a state liquor license for this. Mike Milan has offered to do the whole bar business, but a final decision was not made. We will need 9 persons for parking. The entry fee this year jumped to $9 or $10 depending on the gift of food for the Food Pantry. We need Silent Auction baskets. Last year we had 11. Eva said she would handle voting forms and vending forms. She is going to develop a Taste of Louisville file so everything will be available from year to year. We need business sponsors.

Other. It was decided that the 2 band winners and the scholarship recipient would be invited to next week’s meeting.

Annual dinner. Skyland Pines, Wednesday evening June 25. Cost is about $22 for steak, scrod or vegetarian entrees.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

June 11, 2014

Engage Rotary, Change Lives

President Eva Roshong called the meeting to order with 36 Rotarians and guests in attendance. In honor of the baseball season, Song Master Mark Sigler led the group in a rousing Take Me Out to the Ballgame proving once and for all that Mark has musical talents that go beyond the Beetles.

Happy Dollars

* Betty Derry announced the Changing of America exhibit and asked for volunteers to man the display over the 6-week period it will be in Louisville. a sign-up sheet was passed around. She is also grateful that StarkParks received a $200,000 grant to mediate the asbestos in the two Molly Stark buildings on Columbus Road.

* Nicole Grandee reminded Rotarians of the Chamber of Commerce After Hours program planned for Oakhill Life Care Center TONIGHT.

* Eva was thankful her graduation from Leadership Stark was in two weeks.

* Mike Snyder reminded everyone the AEPOhio Energy Savers Program was winding down.

* Yvette Blandford reminded everyone of the Friends of the Library book sale this weekend.

* Pat Richardson offered a group thank-you to Mike Snyder and Gina Duplain for their work as volunteer consultants for the AEP Energy Savers program.

Cynthia Kerchner thanked the club for the flowers and passionately reminded the women of the importance to get yearly mammograms. Cynthia will begin treatments soon.

Club Business

N Before introducing the day’s program, Bill Wood presented American flags to both our exchange students. Wood also introduced LHS band Rotary-sponsored award winners Tanner Wick (Ohio University) and Rachel Zeller (University of Akron). RYALA attendees Hannah Yeagley and Raychel Bowman were introduced. Under the Louisville Community Foundation Scholarship Program, Rotary gave a $1,000 scholarship to Paige Fromich who will be attending Ohio State University.

The Program

Nat Yeagley shared his experiences as an outbound Rotary exchange student to Brazil. He began his message with a brief geography lesson of the fifth largest country by area in the world. Brazil is 47% of the entire landmass of South America and is the largest Portuguese speaking country in the world. It has the 7th largest economy in the world and is well known to Americans as the worlds leading exporter of coffee.

 

Nat lived in Joinville, a city of 600,000 where it rained twice each day. He spent the year living in homes of three different families. He learned the Portuguese language and feels comfortable in his communication skills using Portuguese. His main meal every day was steak, rice and beans. Nate told the story of spending New Year’s Eve on the beach and the new year was welcomed in with fireworks and at midnight, everyone ran into the ocean for a dunking.

 

Nat shared a number of beautiful photographs he took and each had a special story about his yearlong adventure.

    

We’re glad Nat had the experience and welcome him home.

Upcoming Meetings

June  18  Library update

June  25 `     Annual dinner at Skyland Pines, 6 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

 

 

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

June 18, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided. It is her last regular meeting, as the new officers will be installed next Wednesday.

Meeting for lunch at Paradise UCC Church, the 20 members in attendance enjoyed making their own chef salads. Dessert was special — a birthday cake for Eva who has now reached the Big 5—0. Eva’s 50 candles did not set off the church’s smoke detectors and she managed to blow them out on the first try earning her a new nickname — Windy.

Following the Pledge of Allegiance and a recitation of Rotary’s Four-Way Test, the weekly song was For She’s a Jolly Good Leader, in honor of Eva. Liz Hand gave the dinner prayer.

During the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Very special news from Liz Hand, who bubbling with joy announced that she and her husband are expecting their first child. May God be with Liz and their unborn child.

     * Andy Turowski is happy that last night’s storm resulted in NO injuries.

Unfinished club business

     * It was announced that beginning with our July 9 meeting under the leadership of President-elect Bill Wood, the cost of our meals would be $8, up from $7. Bill must be a Democrat. There will be no meeting July 2 due to the July 4th holiday.

     * Eva presented special awards to:

          N Bill Wood for his work with the exchange student program.

          N Mike Snyder for sponsoring a new member.

          N Thane Bolden for his committee’s disease prevention work.

          N Andy Turowski for his committee’s work in conflict resolution

          N Allen Gress for his news reporting and secretarial works.

          N Other Rotarians too numerous to list individually. This year was truly a                  team effort, Eva said.

·         Eva said that despite some confusion, the cost of the banquet meal is $20, not $25 that was previously stated.

·         Eva called Mayor Pat Fallot and offered club manpower to help clean-up storm damage from the heavy rains and high winds over the last three days.

The Program

Police Chief Andy Turowski, and our own fellow Rotarian, spoke about law and order in Louisville, Ohio for 2013 as reported in his year end statistical report. Andy began his message with “The day’s news is “The water is up; crime is down!”

The LPD is 21 officers strong, 11 full time and 10 part time. The Affordable Care Act has changed scheduling and the department will rely more on full time personnel and less with part timers. Dispatching is done by contract with the City of Canton.

Other than noteworthy crimes such as meth labs and massage parlor prostitution, crimes that affect citizens are down. “But no community is immune to crime,” he reminded us. The department logged in the neighborhood of 5,800 calls. Half of those calls come in on the 2 to 11 p.m. shift; a quarter from midnight to morning shift and a quarter during the day shift. There were 411 arrests, a 13% decrease over 2012. There have been 556 traffic violations and most of the radar traps are complaint driven. The department’s budget is $1,362,000 and change. That comes out to about $48 a person per year.

Other crime statistics of interest:

          Assaults           47 in ’12     36 in ‘13

          Breaking & entering 30 in ’12     37 in ‘13

          Robbery               1 in ’12          4 in ‘13

                       Burglary            51 in ’12         32 in ‘13

          Vandalism               128 in ’12         93 in ‘13

                       Theft                     224 in ’12             190 in ‘13

Police officers receive on average 26 hours of training and refresher courses each year. Andy was most proud of the department’s new quarters on West Main Street which provided three times the usable space from the old police station located in City Hall. “We now can meet all the state and federal mandates for holding adults and juveniles,” he said. Louisville has one officer assigned to the county drug unit and one officer assigned to the Alliance SWAT team. There is one school resource officer and one officer assigned to the Domestic Violence Task Force. The officers receive “Active Shooter” training, but the hope is that it is never needed.

Andy had a few minutes left for questions. The members left for the day feeling a bit safer knowing Andy Turowski is Louisville’s Cop One.

The meeting adjourned at 1:03 p.m.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Allen Gress, Secretary

 
 
 
 
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