Louisville Rotary Meetings 2014     
1st Quarter
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Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 8, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided.

Following a Board of Directors meeting, 22 members and three guests were in attendance for a club business meeting to open the 2014 year. Following the Pledge of Allegiance, the club sang God Bless America, setting the tone for Service Above Self. Members recited the Four-Way Test, and Chaplain Liz Hand aptly provided the invocation preparing the members for the tasks at hand. Guests were prospective members Tim & Yvette Blandford and Catherine Catlett, a new administrator with Green Meadows. The Blandfords are the club’s first corporate members as representatives from the Friends of the Library. They are the parents of Marci, our current outbound exchange student spending the year in France. Catlett, who currently lives in Minerva, hails from Springfield, Ohio.

But first, the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Eva announced the happy engagement of her oldest daughter with an expected August wedding. This means there will be two Roshong daughters planning weddings this summer. Eva & Brad are purchasing lottery tickets in preparation.

     * Mike Snyder praised Marci Blandford’s blog detailing her adventures as an American in Paris, and Bill Wood is to send each member a link to her blog.

    

Committee Reports and other club business

n  Finance Committee — Jared. Still working on budget with hopes of having it ready for the next business meeting. There is $8,000 in the club’s savings/checking account.

n   Flags — Ken Smith. Lost three route people and looking for new volunteers.

n Youth Exchange. Bill Wood & Denny Valentine. Wood announced there are 17 outbound students from our district for next year sponsored by 17 different clubs. Unfortunately, there are no outbound students from Louisville. Two local host families starting about Easter for our two girls are needed.

n  Rotary Foundation — Greg Anderson. Greg gave a pep talk on the value of the Paul Harris Foundation with a side bar about the local matching gift that could apply to the requirements to become a Paul Harris Fellow. Bob Hallier suggested the club make a recognition donation for any person who does exemplary service.

n  Health Fair project — Eva announced the Health Fair was still in the discussion stages and she would try to have persons from the Dennison Club and a representative from the Quest medical group speak to us. The project would require a lot of volunteers and a leader (TBA).

Eva also announced the Taste of Louisville would again be held at the Water’s Edge the third week of July. Since there was only one police officer there last year, it is suggested a second officer be hired for this summer’s extravaganza.

n  Eva shared the story of the Boardman Rotary’s project in the Caribbean Island of Dominique. The club is requesting donations of certain needed supplies OR cash. She suggested we give money, but no amount or action was taken.

n  Allen Gress announced the snow policy for the church and how it will affect Rotary meetings. In a nutshell — If the Louisville Schools are closed on a meeting day, the church will also close; therefore, there will be no Rotary meeting.

Upcoming Meetings

Jan. 15 — Rescuing Grey Hounds (Dogs, not buses).

Jan. 22 — Representative from the Muskingum Watershed.

Jan. 29 — Louisville School Superintendent Steve Milano.

Feb. 1 — Business meeting.

Feb. 8 — Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot gives her State of the City report.

Feb. 15 — Nimishillen Twp. Trustee Mike Lynch gives his State of the Township report.

The meeting adjourned at 1:01 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Allen Gress

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 15, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided.

Attendance for the January 22 meeting topped at 34, including 24 members, three adult guests, 2 exchange students, 2 RYLA students and 3 Greyhound dogs. Following the chili and toasted cheese lunch – the dogs did not partake – the group did the Pledge of Allegiance, recited the Rotary Four Way Test and sang the club’s old favorite Row, Row Rotary.

     Guests included Arden Lingenhoel, Frances Konopka, a friend of Bob Hallier, and Bryan Corzen, an intern at AlterCare. Hannah Yeagley and Rachel Baughman are the LHS juniors attending RYLA and, of course, our two exchange students, Kiriha Nakagawa and Firorello Pillonetto.

 But first, the Happy Dollars portion of the meeting:

     * Betty Derry announced she survived the flooding of the old post office due to a              broken pipe in the water cooler. She also passed out form letters for                member support for the StarkParks grant application to help Molly Stark.             She also thanked the club for the grant to the Historical Society.

     * Tim Blandford invited all to the open house for the Friends of the Library get-            together Friday, Jan. 31. There is wine tasting and entertainment. Tim also           thanked the club for its support for Light up Louisville.

     * Liz Hand is moving her business to Alliance, but will continue with our club.               Happy huntng, Liz.  Her new office is in the Giant Eagle Plaza on State St.

     * Jim Edwards pointed out the club now had members representing three nursing       homes. Could it be a reflection of our members? The next quip was a hope              there would be no new members that are competition for Scooter Israel’s           business.

     * Bill Wood announced there was need for 100 items for the RLYA goodie bag           with items due by Feb. 18.

     * Denny Valentine announced the speaker for the June Rotary new officer                 installation and banquet is David Baker, the new Director of the Pro                   Football Hall of Fame. The dinner location is not settled yet.

     * Maranda Ramsey discussed support for the Relay for Life and the possibility of a             fundraiser selling tickets for Cleveland Indians games. Cost is $22 with the             club getting $8 a ticket. She was instructed to get game dates and we               might commit to 25 sales. Possible club social outing?

 

                        The Program

 

The program theme, Rescuing Greyhounds, was presented by Rosemary Cazantzes with helpe from her friend Jean. But the stars of the show were Skiddles, Romeo and Krackow — three full-blooded Greyhounds. Rosemary told us everything about Greyhound dogs that we have ever wanted to know.

N  These dogs were racing dogs in their youth and ran Greyhound races at Wheeling Downs Race Track in West Virginia. Greyhounds run from ages 2 through 5, but     after that old age sets in and the dogs are sent to homes for adoption.     Greyhounds begin training at 6 months. Rosemary did not say what happens to old Greyhounds that are not adopted, but we can guess. A Greyhound usually    lives to the middle teens.

N  Greyhounds are the second fastest animal on Earth and can run at 42 miles per hour.    Cheetahs are the fastest animals.

N Greyhounds originated in Egypt sometime about 2500 BC. and were favorite pets of   the Egyptian pharaohs.

N Both US Presidents George Washington and Rutherford B. Hayes had Greyhounds for     pets.

N Greyhounds are not long distance runners, and are couch potatoes when not chasing rabbits. Greyhounds have excellent vision and can see up to a half mile.

N Greyhounds are very competitive when racing to gain advantage a second place dog     may bite the rear of the lead dog.

N The Ohio Greyhound Gathering Association is an organization for Greyhound     fanciers.

N  The dogs are tattooed in the soft part of their ears.

N  Greyhounds are clean dogs and have no oil in their fur.

N If interested, the cost of a slightly used Greyhound is about $185; they come      wormed, neutered and have their shots.

 

                        Future programs

 

Jan. 29 — Louisville School Superintendent Steve Milano.

Feb. 1 — Business meeting.

Feb. 8 — Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot gives her State of the City report.

Feb. 15 — Nimishillen Twp. Trustee Mike Lynch gives his State of the Township report.

The meeting adjourned at 1:15 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Allen Gress

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

January 22, 2014

President-elect Bill Wood presided as Eva Roshong was on vacation.

Guests for the meeting included Catherine Catlett, Nick Morris from StarkParks, and County Commissioner Richard Regula. We missed an attendance count, but it appeared we had about 20 members present.

Happy Dollars

     * Betty Derry praised the work of all those who wrote letters of support for                  StarkParks grant for cleaning asbestos from Molly Stark.

     * Maranda Ramsey discussed support for the Relay for Life and a fundraiser selling      tickets for Cleveland Indians games for Sept. 7.  Cost is $22.50 with the $8            going to Relay for Life. The seats are in the mezzanine. She needs the                  money by Aug. 31.

     * Bill Wood acknowledged thank-you notes from the Library staff for their Rotary            grant and from the Greyhound ladies   who appreciated our attention to               their program.    

                       

                             The Program

Speaker for the day’s program was Darrin Lautenschleger from the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District (MWCD), the agency that is responsible for flood reduction, conservation and recreation in the Muskingum River Watershed. The 80-year-old MWCD is considered a political subdivision by the State of Ohio. The agency oversees 16 reservoirs and dams and was founded following the Flood of 1913. Roots of the Conservatory arose from Zanesville, which in 1913 had a disastrous flood that resulted in 467 deaths and $3 billion dollars in damage. Causing that flood was a rainfall that dropped three months of rainfall in three days. That flood, according to Lautenschleger, covered a larger area that Hurricane Katrina. The flood of 2003 was the greatest flood since the reservoirs and dams were constructed; yet there were no deaths and little property damage in the ’03 flood.

 

The MWCD was created in 1933 and covers 8,000 square miles touching 18 counties equaling 20% of the state. This amounts to 54,000 acres including 16,00 acres for 10 lakes and 38,000 acres of land. The Army Corps of Engineers control and maintain the dams and reservoirs. Dover Dam is the only concrete dam. Eighteen judges sit on the Board of Directors with an 18-member advisory board.

 

Attendance at the five parks was between 10 and 11 million guests last year. There are currently five construction projects ongoing now including the Zoar Levy and a $60 million dollar renovation of Dover Dam. The final project will see $635 million dollars spent on the District and another $140 million local money.

 

                        Future programs

 

Jan. 29 — Louisville School Superintendent Steve Milano.

Feb. 1 — Business meeting.

Feb. 8 — Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot gives her State of the City report.

Feb. 15 — Nimishillen Twp. Trustee Mike Lynch gives his State of the Township report.

The meeting adjourned at 1:05 p.m.

Secretary’s notes: I do not do layout of items for the Herald. Usually I send my material electronically and sometimes go for weeks without seeing my boss. I tell you this because for two weeks in a row there has been a problem with the Rotary Report. Last week my report didn’t get printed and this week last week’s article was printed under the picture for this week’s story. I just wanted members to know that I did, in fact, write and submit a report. Here’s my plan — next week will be last week’s Rotary Report — about the Greyhounds. I’ll try to have the picture reprinted with the correct story. For our business meeting Feb. 6, I’ll submit the story about the MWCD.

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Allen Gress

Snow canceled meeting Feb 5th
Snow canceled meeting Feb 5th

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 12, 2014

     President Eva Roshong was at-bat, Bill Wood is on deck, and Mike Snyder is in the hole.

     Attendance for the February 12 meeting was 21 members plus two guests. Prior to the luncheon with Polish fare, the group did the Pledge of Allegiance, recited the Rotary Four Way Test and experienced a royal treat as Mark Sigler showed his fun-loving side by leading the group in singing the Beatle’s favorite She Loves You – yea, yea, yea. If Rotarians listened carefully, very carefully, they could hear a slight Ringo Starr influence in Sigler’s voice. Yea, yea, yea!

     Guests included Eva’s future son-in-law Ryan and Ryan Tingler, our program speaker.

     The Happy Dollars portion of the meeting was a bonanza for the club treasury.

     * Betty Derry — gave a pitch for the annual Lsv.-Nim. Historical Society dinner.              Just $25 a head. Also, with the successful Elder Beerman book sale, the               Society now has the funds to purchase a new sound system.

     * Tim Blandford — the open house for the Friends of the Library get-                         together Jan. 31was a success with a good turn out.

     * Bill Wood said our Japanese exchange student had a date for the Heart’s Dance           and had a good time although she needed some encouragement to attend.

     * Denny Valentine announced the speaker for the June Rotary new officer                 installation and banquet is David Baker, the new Director of the Pro                   Football Hall of Fame. The dinner location is not settled yet.

     * Maranda Ramsey encouraged members to check-out the Eric Snow YMCA in               downtown Canton. The new Y can be seen from her apartment across a           parking lot in the Arts District.

     * Steve Roberts announced a martial arts demonstration next week at his location            in the Chris Downy Fitness Center in beautiful downtown Louisville.

     * Pat Richardson announced the Y membership drive is still on going and a local             membership is good countywide.

 

                        The Program

 

A technical engineer specializing in water treatment systems, Ryan Tingler discussed the use of chemicals and electroanalyses in cleansing water used in deep drilling oil and gas wells currently being developed in eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania and West Virginia. A native of Steubenville, Tingler is an independent contractor now employed by Baker-Hughes, a large oil/gas driller. Tingler, lives in Louisville and has 10-month-old twins. His wife teaches in the East Canton School System. We learned that it takes five million gallons of water for each well and the water is recycled and used over. That is Tingler’s responsibility. A centrifuge cleans the water of debris and the brine needs to be taken to West Virginia to be dumped as Ohio’s laws prohibit the dumping of oil well brine. But Tinger insists there is no danger, no pollution in the oil well water following his treatment process. It is clear and can be drunk, he insisted. Road departments to control snow and ice use some of the salt brine. Tingler says he favors EPA regulations. He answered the question raised about the square, single axel trucks — they are frack trucks and are used for storage of water either going into the wells or coming out. Fracking does not cause earthquakes, he said. There is 13 feet of concrete surrounding each deep well, so the likely hood of water contamination is slim, according to Tingler. Unfortunately, there is not much deep drilling going on in Stark County at this time.

     Rotarians were impressed with Tingler’s knowledge. He had 20 minutes to give his presentation and he spoke with authority.

 

                        Future programs

 

Feb. 19 — Nimishillen Twp. Trustee Mike Lynch gives his State of the Township report.

Feb. 26 — Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot gives her State of the City report.

 

March 5 — Board meeting and business meeting.

 

March 12 — Mike Snyder will explain AEPs Energy Saving Initiative with help from Tom Ault

 

The meeting adjourned at 1:05 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Allen Gress
Ryan Tingler


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 19, 2014

     President Eva Roshong presided with 24 members and the program guest in attendance. The members dined on Russian fare — chicken, red beets, white potatoes, black bread and a wedge of Russian tea cake for dessert. After the Pledge of Allegiance, members recited the Rotary Four Way Test and in tribute to President’s Day sang My Country ‘Tis of Thee. Ted Burwell gave the invocation.

                             Happy Dollars

     * Betty Derry — gave a pitch for the annual Lsv.-Nim. Historical Society dinner.              Just $25 a head. The Historical Society now boasts 190 members and is             collecting items for their auction held during the annual dinner.

     * Steve Roberts announced a martial arts demonstration Saturday and Tuesday at              his location in the Chris Downy Fitness Center in beautiful downtown           Louisville. Steve said his martial arts program also teaches Asian culture              besides fighting. He also reminded people the Chamber of Commerce’s            annual dinner is coming March 7 at Skyland Pines. The Rotary Club is a              Chamber member therefore is welcome to attend the dinner.

     * Ron Derry announced on the way to work this morning he hit a deer and the            resulting crash totaled his favorite truck, a vintage GMC half-ton pick-up              that some day soon may have be in the Canton Classic Car Museum.

 

                             The Program

Nimishillen Township trustee Mike Lynch presented his State of the Township report. Following a brief history of the township government concept that dates from 1803, Lynch said Nimishillen Township was founded in 1809. Township government, according to Lynch, is the most efficient form of government in Ohio and only 3% of the total amount of money spent each year for all governmental operations goes for township government. But, he said, townships are becoming a thing of the past. The need for central water and sewer systems are hurting townships. Louisville will become the premier city in Stark County he said, and it’s time for the two entities to work together. However, one of the biggest problems facing the township is Governor Kasich who cut local funding – everyone’s budget – but now the economy is improving, none of those cuts have been rescinded. “Give some of that money back Governor,” he implored.

Lynch praised the Nimishillen Township Fire Department and CenCom, their dispatch center that now handles dispatching for 22 different departments including the Louisville Fire Department. “CenCom wants more of Louisville’s business,” he said, referring to the police department that uses the Stark County Sherriff’s dispatch.

Several questions were asked by the Rotarians including:

     1. Is the township using more chip & seal instead of blacktop? Yes, Lynch said. It costs $20K a mile to chip & seal, but it’s about $79K per mile for blacktop.

     2. Where’s the tax money voted for central 911 being used? Those in authority can’t agree so most of it is in the county bank.

     3. In the Feb. 19 Repository, it was reported that the Village of Canal Fulton and surrounding Lawrence Township have agreed to merge police operations, and what would he think about contacting Louisville Police Chief Andy Turowski and discussing a plan for the LPD to provide policing for NImishillen Township? Lynch was enthusiastic about the idea. “We are one community,” he said.

     4. What about the idea for a hotel in the US 62/SR44 area? Two or three persons expressed interest, but there is nothing going on for sure.

     5. Are there any residential allotments on the drawing board for the township? None that he is aware of.

     6. How about joining an electricity and/or gas aggregation? The township is in the same programs the city is currently in.

 

                        Future programs

 

Feb. 26 — Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot gives her State of the City report.

March 5 — Board business meeting.

March 12 — Mike Snyder will explain AEPs Energy Saving Initiative with help from Tom Ault.

 

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m. sharp.

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Allen Gress

Local Rotary Speech Contest Winner Advances to District Tourney

LHS Senior, Kristin Werstler, was the winner of the Louisville Rotary's annual “4-Way Test Speech Contest" held at Louisville High School on February 26th.  Fellow Senior, Hayley Swain, was the runner-up followed by Olivia Warther.  These young women were our three finalists.

Kristin will advance to the North Canton District Tourney in mid March.  Congratulations to all of our contestants!


Back Row: Hayley Swain, Kristin Werstler, Olivia Warther.

Front Row:  Greg Parrish, Eva Roshong, Miranda Saling, and Ted Burwell were the Judges for the speech test.

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

February 26, 2014

     President Eva Roshong presided with 29 members and 3 guests in attendance enjoying a luncheon with a ham entrée. Speaking of ham, the club may have found a new song leader as the 2nd week in a row Mark Sigler led the members in a Beatles sing-a-long, this time in honor of Beatle George Harrison’s 71st birthday. The song-of-the-day was All Together Now. Our guest speaker Pat Fallot joined Mark in leading the pack of singers. Club Chaplain Liz Hand gave the prayer and Jim Edwards, who reminded us to hold a hand over our heart, lead the Pledge of Allegiance.

                             Happy Dollars

* Betty Derry — Again the Historical Society is among the store leaders in the sale of   Elder-Beerman discount books with the goal of earning $1,000 in sight.

* Steve Roberts reminded people the Chamber of Commerce’s annual dinner at      Skyland Pines. Just $15. Friday, March 7. The Rotary Club is a Chamber      member therefore we are welcome.

                             Club News

+ Judy Marzoppi, representing the Town & Country Garden Club, thanked the club for our donation and participation in welcome signs for the city project. The sign located on SR 44 north is up, but not landscaped yet. The sign for south 44 is sitting in the city garage. A car went off the highway and damaged the support poles and the Service Department will replace the poles and fasten the sign when the weather breaks. The existing signs will be refurbished this summer as the landscaping is completed — when the weather breaks.

+ Liz Hand introduced her brother Clinton, who is a visitor. He has joined the company’s investment firm. A prospective member?

+ Eva announced that this year the club has provided 27 warm coats in our Warm Coats project. We have also sent $100 for books to schools and orphanages in the Dominican Republic.

+ The club is now encouraging corporate memberships and the Friends of the Library is the first corporate member.

+ There is a need for two instructors to teach economics for 8th graders in the Junior Achievement program. Both Eva and Liz Hand volunteered.

+ The Jackson-Belden Rotary Club is sponsoring a business expo, Thursday, Feb. 27 from 4-8 at the University Center, KSU-Stark. We are invited.

 

                             The Program

Louisville Mayor Pat Fallot presented the State of the City address for Rotarians after accepting a Rotary check for $2,000 for the Constitution Week Committee. The club has committed the amount each year for the Constitution Week activities. City Manager Tom Ault and Police Chief Andy Turowski, both Rotarians, were present to provide back up for the Mayor.

The Mayor stated the city was in solid financial shape with a $1.2 million carryover from 2013 and income tax receipts are up due to new businesses coming to town. There are new houses and remodeling in progress as reported by the number of building permits issued. Local unemployment is down meaning that income tax money coming in is up. The city did not run out of road salt as neighboring cities did. Weather-caused potholes in the city streets are a problem, but the Street Department is using cold patch to fill them, but cold patch is a temporary fix. The Fire Department has moved into the police space in City Hall and the city has 22 fire fighters with staffing from 7 am, to 11 p.m. There were 1,376 fire calls for service in 2012, but last year that number increased to 1,482, with over 1,100 of those calls for EMS service. The Police Department is enjoying their new facilities on West Main Street and are currently transferring records to an automated system. There are 10 full time police officers and 11 parttime. The department is keeping a close watch on the drug problems in town. Two new police cruisers have been ordered and the department is switching to Chevrolets due to the discontinued manufacture of the venerable Ford Crown Victoria. Fallot discussed the employment of Vince Marion as the city’s new Economic Development director who will begin March 15. The Building Appeals Committee is looking for a volunteer or two. The city has two annexations in the pipeline. The city recently joined with ARTSinSTARK for some exciting programs planned for the coming months. Light up Louisville was a great success and there are hopes it will continue as a community tradition. Fallot encouraged residents to get into AEP’s Energy Saving Project, which may bring $30,000 to local institutions.

Fallot took questions from the floor:

The old Penney Alley burned building and closed alley — how close are these issues to being resolved? Answer: Waiting on certificate from County Building Inspector to re-open alley. Nothing is happening on burned building.

Police coverage for Nimishillen Township — Answer: Willing to discuss it with the township.

What’s going on with the new Chesapeake building? Answer: Expecting 100 employees to move in later this month or early April and use the top three floors.

                        Future programs

March 5 — Board business meeting.

March 12 — Mike Snyder will explain AEPs Energy Saving Initiative with help from Tom Ault.

March 19 — Stark County FEMA Director Tim Werstler.

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m. sharp.

 

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Allen Gress
Pictured: Mayor Pat Fallot

Louisville Rotary

District 6650

Meeting Notes

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Meeting was called to order by President Eva Roshong.

 

Attendance:  Fifteen persons attended today’s meeting.

 

Reports: 
·         Happy Dollars - Betty Derry announced the next program for the Louisville Nimishillen Historical Society on Tuesday, March 11:  “Ohio During the Civil War.”

·         President Roshong reminded everyone that the District Conference is scheduled for Friday and Saturday, May 2 and 3.

·         Celebrated Rotary Club official Suzette Matthews will speak at Myers Lake Ballroom on Friday, April 18.

·         President Roshong reported our receipt of a letter from the Louisville Backpack Committee asking for a donation for this program.  They will be asked to submit a grant application once more.

·         Elizabeth Hand is asking for two volunteers to talk about finances at a Junior Achievement class on March 20 and April 10.

Committee Reports: President Roshong asked each of the committees and areas of focus to give a brief report.

·         Finance – Jared Shive presented the final draft of the 2013/2014 operating budget which has already been approved by the Executive Board.

Motion made by Ken Smith and seconded by Mark Sigler to approve the final draft of the 2013/2014 operating budget, as submitted.

Motion was carried with all those present voting in the affirmative.

“Well done, Jared!”

·         Flags – Ken Smith distributed business cards to use when recruiting new participants and volunteers.

·         Youth Exchange – Denny Valentine reported that we need host families!

·         Membership – Per our Bylaws, Jared Shive is announcing names of two candidates for Rotary Club membership:  Catherine Catlett and Yvette Blandford (Friends of the Library Corporate Member).  Comments about either of these two candidates should be directed to Mr. Shive within seven days.  “After one week, the board will vote on the membership proposal.  If approved by a majority vote, the proposed member shall be considered elected to membership.”

·         Four Way Test Competition at LHS – Maranda Ramsey reported that a winner has been selected and there will be an article in “The Herald” very shortly.

·         Relay for Life – Maranda Ramsey reported that the candy sale at the Louisville Public Library continues to bring in money and plans are being made for the next event which will be held at the Marlington H.S. track in early May.  She is looking into a cooperative effort with the Rotary Clubs in Alliance and Canton.

·         Taste of Louisville – President Roshong reported that she has met with the owners of Waters Edge and plans are being made for another event which will be held on July 16 in cooperation with the Chamber of Commerce.

·         Disease Prevention and Treatment – Thaine Bolden reported that our club was able to purchase a total of 36 winter coats for the first year of this initiative:  27 for YMCA students and 6 for a Battered Women’s Shelter in Alliance.

·         Water and Sanitation – This committee contributed $100 for the Boardman Rotary’s Dominica “hearing mission.”

·         Peace and Conflict Resolution - This committee contributed $100 for the Boardman Rotary’s Dominica “hearing mission.”

·         Maternal and Child Health - This committee contributed $100 for the Boardman Rotary’s Dominica “hearing mission.”

·         Economic and Community Development – Plans are now underway to expand the Farmers Market from May to October.  ArtsInStark may also have an economic impact on downtown development.  In addition, President Roshong reported that Frank Kerchner, Cynthia’s husband, recently had heart bypass surgery in Florida.  He is recovering very well.

                      Respectfully submitted by interim secretary Mike Snyder

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 12, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided. Meeting for lunch at Paradise UCC Church, 20 Rotarians and two guests were in attendance.

Jim Edwards led the Pledge of Allegiance, Ted Burwell the prayer, the Rotary 4-Way Test was recited and Jason Buydos led a rousing singing of Row, Row Rotary that actually sounded pretty good.

The Happy Dollars portion of the meeting brought in one one buck.

     * Bill Wood was selling McDonald’s coupons for $10 with profits going to help Firorello Pillometto, our exchange student from Argentina, with the school’s pay-to-play fee of $200 so she can play on the LHS softball team. Firorello has never played softball before coming to America and has apparently made the team.

Items of Business

Ted Burwell’s, son Vince was a visitor. Vince is on spring break from his studies at Ohio State University where he is in his sophomore year.

The letter requesting a donation for the after-prom activities for LHS students was read and President Roshong suggested the use of the Happy Dollar Fund as a source for a donation. No action was taken.

President Roshong told of the Chamber of Commerce dinner and the coming of the ArtsinStark program to Louisville.

The kitchen staff asked if the club was interested in a fish luncheon during this Lenten period, but the cost is an extra $1. A vote was taken and the majority decided a fish meal was fine.

President Roshong reminded members of the annual Grant Management Seminar (GMS) scheduled for Saturday, 29 at the Foltz Community Center in East Canton. We will begin with breakfast at 8 am and be finished by Noon. The cost for this training event is $7.50 per person, which can be paid at the door. Register online through the District 6650 web site. Participation in this training is required for all 2013-14 club presidents and club Foundation chairs and is open to all interested Rotarians.

The Literacy Committee also contributed $100 to the Boardman Rotary Club's Dominica "hearing mission.  "

                             Program

Louisville City Manager and Rotarian Tom Ault, Rotarian Mike Snyder and AEP representative Jina Duplain were guests and presented a program about AEP’s community Energy Savers program. Louisville is one of only 4 Ohio cities that have been selected for this program which runs from January through June. The program’s goal is to help residents and businesses in the city reduce energy and costs. There is a goal of 300 participants and if the city reaches the 300 figure by the completion of the program, the community will be given up to $30,000 for use in an energy saving project. Both the YMCA and the Library’s Old Post Office building have been selected for energy saving lighting upgrades if the community responds and meets the point goal. To date, the community has made 10% of the goal.

There are a number of ways the community can help and be rewarded themselves. One is the grant program that offers rebates on replacement heat pumps, air conditioners, duct sealing, furnace replacement, air sealing, electric water heaters, window replacements, and increased insulation. To gain a better understanding of resident needs, the company is sponsoring a 1-hour inspection by a trained assessor to check and advise homeowners. The inspection carries a $25 fee. Those all-electric homes can get a 4-hour energy audit for $50. Businesses and apartment owners can get energy audits, too. Each energy audit earns a point toward the city’s 300 goal.

Refrigerators and freezers over 12 years old can be picked up for free and residents receive a $50 gift from AEP. Residents can receive an on-line energy assessment for free with energy saving tips mailed to their homes for self-installation.

Residents can call 877-856-2454 or visit AEPOHIO.com/WasteLess for more information. Or residents can call Mike at 216-544-4053.

Upcoming events

March 19 — Stark County FEMA Director Tim Werstler with District Governor Debbie Esbenshade visiting.

March 26 — YMCA news by Pat Richardson

Respectfully submitted,

Allen Gress, Secretary

Mike Snyder, Jina Duplain, and Tom Ault

Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 19, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided for the luncheon meeting held at Paradise UCC Church with 25 Rotarians and special guest District 6630 Governor Debbie Esbenshade in attendance. Two other guests attended,

Jim Edwards led the Pledge of Allegiance, Liz Hand the prayer, the Rotary 4-Way Test was recited and Mark Sigler led a rousing 4-part singing of Row, Row Rotary.

Happy Dollars

* David Redd, without the “boot” on his damaged ankle, was grateful for twin baby grandchildren recently born in Huston, TX.

* Jim Edwards told of his amazement watching Eva play basketball with the men at the YMCA. Jim, who knows a good athlete when he sees one, reported that Eva was a pretty good player that can sink a soft jumper at 20 feet.

* Mike Snyder promoted the Energy Savers Program and said things were going well.

* Maranda Ramsey is seeking dollars for votes to be a “prom queen” and is holding a fundraiser wine tasting party at the next Historical Society meeting April 8. It’s all in fun with the funds going to Project Care.

* Maranda’s husband is taking orders for the home delivery of a dozen roses for $15, a fundraiser for Boy Scout troop 15.

* Bill Wood is still selling McDonald’s coupons for $10 with profits going to help Firorello Pillonetto, our exchange student from Argentina, with the school’s pay-to-play fee of $200 so she can play on the LHS softball team.

Items of Business

Rhonda Griffin, the Executive Director of the Louisville Area Chamber of Commerce, was a guest.

Eva announced the club had $145 in the Happy Dollars account.

                             Program I

The District Governor announced the gain of 44 new members district-wide over the past year. She presented the club a plaque for our support of Project Warm, a project that had 100% participation of District 6650 clubs. Sixty-two thousand dollars were raised that purchased 3,200 winter coats. The District member club giving to the Rotary Foundation is up this year and our club has participated in every District project this year. Rotarians remembered to stand when the District Governor was introduced.

Program II

Tim Werstler, the Stark County FEMA Director, was our speaker discussing community preparedness. The Emergency Management (EMA) Director, as his office is called, used to be called Civil Defense as many older Rotarians remember. Disaster services and Emergency Preparedness are other names sometimes used. The name EMA is slowly being replaced with the title Homeland Security. Regardless of the title, his office is the central point for disasters and is the agency that makes requests for assistance to the state and federal agencies. EMA is a mult-agency coordination system and is a complete systems organization to manage large-scale disasters for the 37 political districts in Stark County. “This is what I do,” he said. “But what can you do?”

Werstler said safety and volunteer workers are only effective if they know their families are safe. Take care of your family first and to do that, he had several suggestions while stressing that emergency preparedness begins with you! There are no city, county, state or federal funds for assisting individuals or businesses until the governor or the president declares the incident a disaster.

What you should do —

* Get an emergency kit. Create an emergency plan. Decide in advance where your family will go in the event of an emergency. Be informed and learn about the hazards where you live.

* Have the birthdates, Social security numbers of all family members with you. This is how people are tracked in the event you become separated with no method of transportation available.

* Use social media to cast the net for missing or unknown family members. Texting will work when phone lines are clogged with calls, which is not uncommon following an emergency.

* Store supplies for 72 hours including bottled water. Packaged rice is a good food choice and a 25-lb. bag and stores well and with the ability to heat water, add some sugar, bouillon cubes the rice will feed a family of 4 for a week.

* Need computer back-up. 60% of small businesses destroyed in a disaster never make it back.

* Check your insurance policies. Sewer back up is an important add-on. You also might consider “earth moving” insurance.

* Become familiar with emergency notification systems and how to access them.

* The Small Business Administration offers loans that must be paid back. The Federal Housing Administration will offer loans, which must be paid back, and the Farmers Home Administration will offer loans that must be paid back.

* Additional information can be obtained from www.ready.gov   or  www. Fema.gov   or www. starkcountyohio.gov/ema  or www.facebook.com/starkcountyema .

Upcoming events

March 26 — YMCA news by Pat Richardson

April 2 — Board and business meeting – new member initiation

 

Respectfully submitted,  Allen Gress, Secretary


Louisville Rotary Club

Meeting minutes

March 26, 2014

President Eva Roshong presided for the luncheon meeting held at Paradise UCC Church with 25 Rotarians and a host of special guests in attendance.

Jim Edwards led the Pledge of Allegiance; giving the prayer Liz Hand thanked God for the snow among other gifts; the Rotary 4-Way Test was recited and Mark Sigler complete with props, grabbed the microphone and led the singing of the 1978 song by the Village People — YMCA. The day’s program featured Y Director Pat Richardson and her staff talking about the YMCA.  It’s almost a custom at wedding receptions anymore to group sing — “It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A.! Y.M.C.A!” complete with hand motions.

The man in the hard hat. Could it be? 

 With thanks to David Yeagley

Happy Dollars

* Jim Edwards, who tried to stiff paying his dollar, announced the deposit of $3,500 in Flag applications money into the club treasurery. We had 1,154 flag customers last year and he is hoping to beat that number in 2014.

* Al Gress is looking for company to attend Cleveland Indians games this summer as Gail has sworn off attending baseball games. Bob Hallier accepted the invitation.

* Bill Wood introduced Firorella Pillonetto, our exchange student from Argentina, and Kiriha Nakagawa, our exchange student from Japan.

                             Program I

Hannah Yeagley and Rachel Baughman, both LHS juniors, spoke about their participation at the District RYLA meeting held earlier this month. RYLA — Rotary Youth Leadership Awards — is a program for high school juniors encouraging leadership. Both girls stressed that went to the weekend with doubt and skepticism, but returned home feeling the weekend was worthwhile and enjoyable. There were over 100 teens there from all-over our district.

Program II

. Rotarian Pat Richardson, who is also the executive director of the Louisville YMCA, presented the program, and opened with an introduction of the 7-person full time staff. Pat shared with us the fact that the Y provided over $66,000 worth of financial assistance in over 400 individual grants to 750 individuals who needed help in making the costs of Y membership. She also gave credit to 75 volunteers — all of whom have the Y’s mission at heart. We learned the Y sponsors after school programs at both North Nimishillen and Louisville Elementary schools. And there is a summer day camp We heard about the Leader’s Club for pre-teen girls and the Healthy Kids Day. There’s a 10-K race – Saturday, June 7 – so bring your running shoes and give it a shot! There is a Y gymnastics team of 40 kids and a wellness initiative with the schools to fight obesity. Two bus trips for all ages are held. Adult and youth sports programs are a part of the Y’s programming and what would a Y be without a swimming pool? Learn to swim program to competitive swimming teams are available with over 60 kids a part of the Blue Nautics swimming team.

The program ended with a five-minute power point video of kids having fun at the Y.

 

Upcoming events

April 2 — Board and business meeting – new member initiation

April 9 — Kathleen Wieschaus-Voss speaks about an outstanding American

April 16 — Superintendent Steve Milano speaks about the Louisville School programs

 

Respectfully submitted, 

 

Allen Gress, Secretary
sorry Al but the picture you included of Mark did not copy. I don't know why!




 
 
 
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